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Sea of Thieves

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Sea of Thieves
Sea of thieves cover art.jpg
Developer(s)Rare
Publisher(s)Xbox Game Studios
Director(s)Gregg Mayles
Producer(s)Joe Neate
Designer(s)Mike Chapman
Programmer(s)Peter Campbell
Artist(s)Ryan Stevenson
Writer(s)
  • Chris Allcock
  • Mike Chapman
Composer(s)Robin Beanland
EngineUnreal Engine 4
Platform(s)
ReleaseMicrosoft Windows, Xbox One
  • WW: 20 March 2018
Xbox Series X/S
  • WW: 10 November 2020
Genre(s)Action-adventure
Mode(s)Multiplayer

Sea of Thieves is a 2018 action-adventure game developed by Rare and published by Xbox Game Studios. The player assumes the role of a pirate who completes voyages from different trading companies in order to become the ultimate pirate legend. Sea of Thieves is a first-person multiplayer video game in which players cooperate with each other to explore an open world via a pirate ship. The game is described as a "shared world adventure game", which means groups of players will encounter each other regularly during their adventures, sometimes forming alliances, sometimes going head-to-head.

The game was first conceptualized in 2014. Rare was inspired by players of PC titles such as Eve Online, DayZ and Rust, who used the tools provided by these games to create their own personal stories. The company explored different settings for the game, such as vampires and dinosaurs, though it eventually settled on the pirate theme, drawing inspirations from films including Pirates of the Caribbean and The Goonies. The game features a progression system that only unlocks cosmetic items as the development team wanted to encourage both casual and experienced players to play together. Compared to Rare's other games, Sea of Thieves's development process was more transparent, with Rare inviting fans to test the game's early builds.

Microsoft released the game in March 2018 for Windows and Xbox One; it was also one of the earliest first-party games released for Xbox Game Pass subscribers. The game received generally mixed reviews upon release, with critics praising the game's ship combat, multiplayer gameplay, visuals, and game physics. Criticisms were directed at the game's lack of content, progression, and shallow gameplay. Rare envisioned the title as a "game as a service" and released numerous content updates after the game's release.[1] The game is a commercial success and has attracted more than 15 million players as of July 2020. It also became the most successful new intellectual property (IP) Microsoft have released in the generation. An enhanced version of the game also released for Xbox Series X/S in November 2020. Seasons and a new progression system were announced and will be implemented in January 2021.

Gameplay[edit]

In this gameplay screenshot, the player is firing cannonballs at a hostile pirate ship, which is controlled by another group of players.

Sea of Thieves is a first-person perspective action-adventure. At the beginning of the game, the player selects their procedurally generated player avatar.[2] The game is set in a shared world, which means groups of players will encounter each other throughout their adventures.[3] Solo and duo players sail around in a nimble sloop while players playing in a group control a larger 3 man brigantine or a 4 man galleon cooperatively by assuming different roles such as steering the ship, manning the cannons, navigating, boarding enemy ships,, and scouting from the crow's nest.[4][5] Occasionally players may encounter hostile players who may attack them with cannonballs or board their ship.[6] If areas under the deck take damage, water will flow in and cause the ship to gradually sink. Players need to patch up the holes with planks of wood and bail out water using buckets.[4] Alliances can be established with other parties of players. They will receive gold bonuses when a group in the same alliance completes a voyage. Forming an alliance does not prevent players from attacking each other.[7] If the player dies, they are sent to a ghost ship known as the Ferry of the Damned where they wait until they can respawn.[8] A competitive multiplayer mode named "Arena" was introduced in the Anniversary update; it allows four teams of players to compete against each other by gathering silver in smaller maps.[9]

Players can complete voyages offered by the game's three factions: Gold Hoarders, Order of Souls, and the Merchant Alliance. In the quests offered by Gold Hoarders, players are given a treasure map or a riddle to locate the treasure. The voyages offered by the Order of Souls are mainly combat challenges. Merchant Alliance's missions demand players to deliver goods such as live animals to vendors within a limited time.[10] When players collect a treasure chest, they need to deliver them to the representatives of the quest-giving faction, though the one holding the chest are defenseless and may have it be taken by other players.[11] Completing voyages earns players gold,[12] which can be spent on buying new customization items or enhancements from merchants, weaponsmiths, and shipwrights.[13] Items such as pets can also be purchased using real-world currency by accessing the Pirate Emporium store.[14] Doubloons, earned through completing commendations from the Bilge Rats, the fourth trading company that distributes quests, challenges, and cosmetics added to the game via post-launch updates, can be traded for gold or reputation.[15] The Anniversary update adds Tall Tales, which are a series of structured narrative missions.[16] Completing quests also earns the player reputation points, which unlock more complicated quests from each faction and additional purchasable items.[10][13] When players reach rank 50 with any three of the 6 trading companies, they will earn the title of "pirate legend", which grants players new cosmetic items and access to a pirate hideout.[17]

Players can freely explore the game's open world on their own or with other players.[18][19] When exploring a new location, players can retrieve items such as bananas, which restore their health, wood planks, and cannonballs. Ammunition can be resupplied using the ammo chest in the Captain's Quarters.[20] Weapons including cutlasses, pistols, blunderbusses, and sniper rifles can be used to defeat hostile enemies like skeletons.[8][6] When players are sailing on the ocean, they may sometimes face adverse weather conditions such as thunderstorms[4] or encounter shipwrecks, messages in bottles, and monsters such as the megalodon and the kraken.[21][18] Skull clouds indicate the locations of Skeleton Forts, which are raids that can be completed by players in the same server.[22] Players can interact with each other using emotes.[23] They can also play musical instruments together and drink at taverns.[24][25] The Anniversary update allows players to engage in leisure activities like fishing, hunting, and cooking.[26]

Development[edit]

Sea of Thieves was developed by the UK-based developer Rare. Almost all of Rare's 200 staff members worked on the game.[27] The team began conceptualizing the game in 2014 and wanted to create a title where players can create stories together. The team took five months to create the game's playable prototype named Athena using the Unity game engine.[28] After playing the prototype, Microsoft's executives including Phil Spencer and Kudo Tsunoda agreed to green-light the game's development.[29][30] Rare employees also provided the voice for all of the non-playable characters.[31] Sea of Thieves marked Rare's shift from using its own proprietary engine to using Unreal Engine 4.[32]

Rare was often considered to be a secretive studio. Since Sea of Thieves is a multiplayer-focused game, the studio adopted a more transparency approach to the game's development to ensure that the game's content would resonate with players.[33][28] The team allowed fans to take part in the game's development by joining the Insider's Program, which granted players access to an early build of the game. The program allowed Rare to experiment with different features while collecting players' feedback. The participants could also discuss with the developers in a private forum.[34] More than 30,000 players joined the program.[35] Through the program, Rare learnt more about how players interact with each other and used the information to help the team make gameplay decisions;[36] for instance, the team decided to include solo play after many players from the Insider's Program requested it.[37]

Influences and setting[edit]

"I love the idea of things happening in the world that literally can shape the ongoing fabric and lore of Sea of Thieves. The Black Beard of Sea of Thieves being a real player in a real crew with a real name - that's really hard to do if you've already painted everyone down a path you want them to go through"

— Joe Neate, executive producer of Rare[38]

Studio director Craig Duncan described Sea of Thieves as the "friendliest" multiplayer game.[38] While Rare is traditionally a console game developer, it realized how players from PC survival games like DayZ and Rust, and simulation games such as Eve Online, crafted their own stories by using the tools provided in the game. However, Rare remarked that these games are often very punishing in nature, and the team aspired to create a more light-hearted and accessible version of these games.[39] Sea of Thieves was designed to be a "light canvass of a world" where players create their own stories.[38] The game did not feature any narrative component at launch because the team felt that by offering players a structured narrative, they would only be playing an handcrafted experience. Joe Neate, the game's executive director, described the game as an "improv" comedy, and added that the game is about going "off-script".[38] Rare shaped the world and the game's lore to reflect players' actions, including various easter eggs to celebrate their actions or achievements. The team believed that if a narrative campaign is included, incorporating players' actions into the game's lore would become difficult.[38][39]

The company explored different settings for the game, such as vampires and dinosaurs, though it eventually settled on the pirate theme because it matched the game's core concept which encourages cooperation. Rare also saw less competition in the market.[40] The pirate theme allows players to have the freedom to do what they want in the game's world and decide freely how they want to play and behave. The team looked at various sources for inspiration, including Pirates of the Caribbean and Black Sails. Designer Mike Chapman believed a lot of parallels can be drawn between Sea of Thieves and The Goonies, in which a group of friends bond together while they search for treasure, creating a journey that all of them would fondly remember.[39] Neate added that the game's goal was to evoke "[a] sense of travel and exploration and discovery".[31] The team implemented the "infinite pirate generator" instead of allowing players to customize their avatar as they feared that some players would create "abominations" that would not have fit the game's visual style.[41] The game features a stylized visual style with hand-painted textures.[42] Duncan added that the team chose this painted art style because they wanted it to be "timeless" and reflect the "joyful" and "delightful" game world.[35]

Gameplay design[edit]

Rare noticed that in many multiplayer games, experienced players would focus on grinding for endgame content instead of playing with other players, while novice players would worry about their progression lagging significantly behind more experienced players. Therefore, the team introduced "horizontal progression", in which players would only earn cosmetic items as they achieve a higher rank; all items have the same attributes, so endgame content would not confer gameplay bonuses to experienced players. This progression system encourages more experienced players to assist novice players when they are completing voyages, and reduce the gap between the two experience levels.[39][43] As a "shared world" adventure game, Rare opted to maintain the distance between each player group in a server rather than limiting the number of players a server can accommodate, so that players get to encounter other players regularly but not too frequently. Chapman estimated that a player will see another player-controlled ship every 15 minutes to half an hour.[44]

The gameplay was designed to test the player's soft skills. Players need to exercise their common sense in order to solve the challenges: for instance, players need to learn to read maps. To encourage players to develop these skills, the game does not feature a beginner's tutorial as the team wanted players to discover the game's mechanics by themselves.[39] The team also intentionally avoided setting gameplay rules to encourage players to utilize their creativity.[37] Despite this, Rare also included emergent gameplay in a more systemic manner by introducing shipwrecks and forts that players can discover. Chapman described these locations of interest as the "catalyst for stories" which draw different players together, fostering cooperation or competition. Being attacked by sea monsters also add a layer of unpredictability to the game as these encounters are random.[39] Due to the emergent gameplay, Sea of Thieves was also considered as a "watchable and sharable game", and the team hoped that this will lure players who watched the game on video game live streaming platforms such as Twitch or Mixer to purchase it.[27]

While the game allows solo play, the game is designed to be a multiplayer game in which players cooperate with each other. Chapman added that cooperative gameplay enhances the experience because "it makes sense in the world".[45] The game does not feature any character class or specialization to encourage players to adopt different roles.[46] The maximum crew size is four as Rare felt that if the group is too large, it does not reflect a sense of "intimate friendship" and players may splinter off and hinder inter-player communication.[47] Neate described the game as a "friendship creation tool" and hoped that the game could become a platform where players can befriend strangers.[28] Rare further added that they felt they have the responsibility to create a "positive online social space".[48] Design changes were made to champion the concept of cooperation and friendship. For instance, players cannot hurt others in the same crew,[48] and all rewards are shared equally among crew members.[28] In one of the game's early prototypes, players in the same crew can betray each other, though the feature was scrapped because the team felt that the experience was "horrible".[49] Neate added that the game provided "literally no reason or motivation to do anything other than cooperate".[48] Rare incorporated several anti-toxicity measures. For instance, players can vote to lock a disruptive player into a brig.[50]

Release[edit]

Sea of Thieves was announced by publisher Microsoft Studios during its press conference at E3 2015, with Duncan describing the game as the "most ambitious project" from Rare.[51] Initially set to be released in 2017, the game was delayed to early 2018 to allow additional development time.[52] Microsoft marketed the game extensively. Players who pre-ordered the game received the Black Dog Pack, which included exclusive cosmetic content and access to a closed beta. Players could also purchase a separate Sea of Thieves-themed Xbox wireless controller, and anyone who purchased the Xbox One X console from 18 to 24 March would receive a free digital copy of the game.[53][54] Microsoft's Australian branch partnered with music band Captain Hellfire & The Wretched Brethren for a two-day event in which the pirate band sang different sea shanties requested by players. The program was broadcast via Facebook, Mixer, and Twitch from 24 to 25 March 2018.[55] Microsoft also launched "The Quest", an alternate reality game where players needed to solve different riddles. The winners would receive one of four golden bananas (each valued at £20,000) as rewards.[56] Rare also hosted a competition which tasked fans to create achievements for the game.[57] Several stress tests and betas were released ahead of the game's official launch on 17 March.[58][59] At launch, many players reported that they could not log into the game.[60] Duncan said that Rare underestimated the server capacity as the number of people logging in to play the game during the launch period was unexpectedly high. Various fixes have been released to improve the game's online infrastructure.[61] See of Thieves was released on Steam on June 3, 2020. The game reached the "global top sellers" list in the same week.[62]

In addition to being a retail release, Sea of Thieves is an Xbox Play Anywhere title and the game was made available for Xbox Game Pass subscribers at launch.[63][64] However, crossplay between PC and Xbox One players was made optional in February 2019 to ensure that all players feel that "they have a level playing field".[65] On PC, the game was initially only available through Xbox Game Pass and Microsoft Store before Microsoft announced a release for Steam in April 2020.[66] Players began to set rules, develop their own sets of challenges, and host their own events.[67][68] To further encourage these players, Rare announced plans to incorporate private servers into the game.[69]

Downloadable content[edit]

Rare envisioned Sea of Thieves to be a "game as a service" and expected it to continue receiving updates for 10 years.[70][71] After the team had fixed most of the technical issues, they began looking at players' feedback and identified that players were complaining that there were not enough activities for them to participate in. Chapman stated that the team's strategy was to give players what they want, ensure that they fit within the Sea of Thieves universe, and "surprise" players.[72] Rare has four teams of employees working in parallel to create the game's various expansions so that large content update can be released frequently while ensuring that sufficient development time can be given to each team.[73][74] The team hoped to a large content update every 6 weeks to 2 months, and used "Bilge Rat Adventures", which are time-limited challenges to fill the gap between each expansion.[75] The ultimate goal was to make the game "as big and successful as it can be".[76] The first major expansion, The Hungering Deep, was developed within 2 months. The second expansion, Cursed Sails, introduced skeleton ships controlled by artificial intelligence (AI). Despite being adamant about not doing so prior to the game's launch, the team decided to implement the feature as it was one of the biggest fan requests.[73] The Anniversary update that added both Tall Tales and Arena mode was so massive that it was described as a "relaunch" for the game.[77] All the expansions are free of charge as they did not want to divide the player base.[73]

In December 2020, Rare announced that they would move away from producing monthly updates for the game and instead, adopt the "battle pass" model popularised by games such as Fortnie and Fall Guys. Each season, which would last for about three months, would introduce new content or new ways of playing the game, with live events being hosted regularly. Rare would also introduced the "Plunder Pass", which is an optional premium tier that grants players additional rewards. The first season is set to begin in January 2021. Rare also announced that they would stop updating the Arena mode as the vast majority of the players spent their time playing the cooperative adventure mode.[78]

Major expansion packs
Name Release date Notes
The Hungering Deep 20 May 2018[79] The Hungering Deep introduced new tools such as the Speaking Trumpet and a narrative campaign featuring the megalodon.[80]
Cursed Sails 31 July 2018[81] Cursed Sails introduced AI ships, a new story campaign, the brigantine which can accommodate three players, and the "alliance" mechanic.[81]
Forsaken Shores 27 September 2018 Forsaken Shores introduced new cosmetic items, a new volcanic region named Devil's Roar, a new type of voyage named "Cargo Run", a rowboat, and a narrative campaign centered on Forsaken Shores Alliance.[82]
Shrouded Spoils 28 November 2018 Shrouded Spoils introduced fog into the game, changed the AI behavior of both the kraken and the megalodon, and altered some of the existing gameplay systems.[83]
Anniversary 30 April 2019[84] The Anniversary update introduced a separate player-versus-player (PvP) competitive multiplayer mode named Arena, the first narrative-based Tall Tales campaign named Shores of Gold which consists of nine chapters, and the Hunter's Call, which added fishing, cooking, and hunting into the game.[85]
Black Powder Staches 17 July 2019 Black Powder Staches includes a series of missions that task players to collect gunpowder barrels and then sold them to various factions.[86]
Dark Relics 15 August 2019 Dark Relics introduces new voyages, cosmetic items, new commendations, and rowboats mounted with harpoon guns.[87]
Smuggler's Fortune 11 September 2019 The update adds the Pirate Emporium, a new store that supports microtransactions. A new type of currency named "Ancient Coins" can be purchased from both the Xbox store and in-game. Players can also buy monkeys and parrots as pets from the Pirate Emporium.[88]
Fort of the Damned 16 October 2019 Fort of the Damned introduced several Halloween-themed cosmetics, a new skeleton font, and a new type of enemy named Shadow Skeletons.[89]
The Seabound Soul 20 November 2019 The Seabound Soul introduced fire into the game with the fiery cannonball and a new Tall Tale which has players partner with adventurer Sir Arthur Pendragon as they embark on a journey to seek a "feared ship".[90]
Festival of Giving 11 December 2019 Festival of Giving introduced several Christmas-themed cosmetic items and a mission that tasks the players to assist Stitcher Jim to retrieve a shipment of gifts lost at sea. A new tutorial mode named Maiden Voyage was also added into the game.[91]
Legends of the Sea 15 January 2020 Legends of the Sea celebrated the game's most notable players by tasking players to embark on a quest to seek various easter eggs.[92]
Crews of Rage 19 February 2020 Crews of Rage brought players back to Devil's Roar to complete Bounty Voyages, which involves acquiring a new chest known as the Chest of Rage.[93]
Heart of Fire 11 March 2020 Heart of Fire introduced the chain-shot and the blunderbomb, a throwable explosive, and included more Tall Tales missions which continue the story started in The Seabound Soul.[94]
Ships of Fortune 22 April 2020 Ships of Fortune introduced a new emissary system, the Reaper's Bones PvP Trading Company, crew member reviving, and cats.[95]
Lost Treasures 27 May 2020 Lost Treasures introduced Tall Tale checkpoints and provided several bug fixes.[96]
Haunted Shores 17 June 2020 Haunted Shores introduced new Ghost Ships as voyages for the Order of Souls, new shanties, shanty selection and bug fixes.
Ashen Winds 29 July 2020 Ashen Winds introduced a new world event in which players face Flameheart’s powerful Ashen Lords.
Vaults of the Ancients 9 September 2020 Vaults of the Ancients introduced a new quest type to the Gold Hoarders, dogs, and various quality of life improvements.
Fate of the Damned 28 October 2020 Fate of the Damned introduced an in-game interface that allows players to track progress through events and challenges.

Sea of Thieves saw frequent collaborations with other Microsoft franchises. The Bird and Bear Figurehead, based on Rare's own Banjo-Kazooie series, was released in July 2018.[97] Ships based on the Halo series and the Gears of War franchise were released in June and November 2019 respectively, as well as a ship set based on Ori and the Will of the Wisps released in March 2020.[98][99] Rare also expanded Sea of Thieves to other media. It had partnered with Mongoose Publishing to release a tabletop game titled Sea of Thieves Roleplaying Game in October 2019.[100] Titan Comics debuted a comic series written by Jeremy Whitley in March 2018.[101] Titan Books also worked with Rare to publish an art book named Tales from the Sea of Thieves.[102]

Reception[edit]

Critical reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate score
AggregatorScore
MetacriticPC: 67/100[103]
XONE: 69/100[104]
Review scores
PublicationScore
Destructoid6.5/10[105]
EurogamerRecommended[106]
Game Informer7/10[107]
GameRevolution2.5/5 stars[108]
GameSpot6/10[109]
GamesRadar+3.5/5 stars[110]
IGN8/10 (2020)[111]
PC Gamer (US)72/100[113]
Polygon6.5/10[112]

Sea of Thieves received "mixed or average" reviews from critics according to review aggregator Metacritic.[103][104] Most critics agreed that the game had potential to be successful but lamented that the game suffered from a lack of content and questioned Rare's decision to release it as a full-priced product.[108][105][110][111][112] The game's graphics and the game physics also received praise.[106][109][113]

The multiplayer portion of the game was well-received. Jordan Devore from Destructoid noted that with a full crew, the game could get chaotic and situations could turn volatile very quickly. He added that cooperation with strangers could create unforgettable experiences for players which could be deeply satisfying.[105] Peter Brown from GameSpot also enjoyed coordinating with other players and goofing around, though he remarked that some players were trolling others which caused the experience to be frustrating.[109] Jeff Grubb from VentureBeat also enjoyed the game, saying that playing with strangers often created numerous hilarious moments.[114] Kyle Hilliard from Game Informer stated that each session "results in a story" due to the emergent gameplay, and praised Rare for successfully creating an excellent "pirate simulator" and "manufacturing a digital playground that is fun to explore".[107] Sam Loveridge from GamesRadar likewise commented that the game is "an anecdote generator at its very best" due to its emergent storytelling.[110] Brandin Tyrrel from IGN stated that "Sea of Thieves works well when treated like a chat room or a party game, where it serves as catalyst for having a good time with the people you’re with".[115]

The gameplay received generally negative reviews. Devore felt that the quests were repetitive and that the world did not have a lot of interesting things to do.[105] Paul Tamburro from Game Revolution agreed, remarking that the quests had little variety and did not allow room for creativity. While he praised the sandbox format, he felt that there were not enough secrets or stories players could discover in the world.[108] Loveridge called the voyages "elaborated fetch quests". He lamented that there was no option to turn off PvP and players could not customize their own characters.[110] Russ Frushtick from Polygon remarked that misbehaving players may make the experience frustrating because PvP could never be disabled. However, he remarked that the game offered no incentive for players who wanted to engage in PvP combat.[112] Hilliard felt that the game did not have enough content to keep players engaged, and remarked that the combat felt bland. Many critics commented that players would not be motivated to complete quests because only cosmetic items are unlocked.[107][108][109][111] Tyrrel praised the ship combat, though he felt that the respawn system was too forgiving.[111] Christian Donlan from Eurogamer likewise called the ship combat "thrilling" and the general combat "crunchy, pleasantly basic".[106] Tyler Wilde from PC Gamer liked exploring the shipwrecks, believing that exploration evokes a sense of discovery, though he commented that he wished more emergent events would happen in the ocean.[113] Solo play received mixed opinions. Some critics thought that it was more difficult,[116] boring,[117] and maddening,[118] while some remarked that it was entertaining,[106] satisfying,[118] and relaxing.[119][116]

After a year of updates, the game received more positive reviews from critics. Following the Anniversary update, IGN stated that players should give the game a second chance and that it was the "perfect time" to return to the game.[120] One of its writers, David Jagneaux, praised the Tall Tales and its riddles in his second review, which he described as "brain teasers that really challenge [player's] detective skills".[111] In his summary, he wrote that the game is a "pirate fantasy sandbox with an enormous amount of things to do, made unpredictable and exciting by the addition of other players".[111] Nicole Carpenter from Polygon praised the post-launch updates for making the title more "curated" with more structure and direction.[121] The game also received PC Gamer's Best Ongoing Game 2019 award,[122] and was listed by Gameindustry.biz as one of their Games of the Year in 2019.[123]

Sales[edit]

Sea of Thieves is a commercial success. The title attracted more than 1 million players two days after it released.[124] It was the best-selling retail game in the UK in its week of release[125] and it became the second best-selling game in the US in March 2018 behind Far Cry 5.[126] On 28 March 2018, Microsoft declared the game as the fast-selling new IP released for the Xbox One.[127][128] Rare attributed the game's success to the title releasing for Xbox Game Pass subscribers at launch, which enabled the game to achieved Rare's sales target for three months in a single day.[129] Game Pass contributed to half of the game's sales,[77] though Microsoft added that the game also sold well in both retail and digital formats.[130] The game passed five million players in August 2018.[131] In January 2020, Rare declared the game was "the most successful IP [Microsoft has] released in the generation", with it amassing more than 10 million players.[132] In addition to good sales, Sea of Thieves was also popular with viewers, with the title being ranked as one of the most watched titles on Twitch in January 2019 following the Shrouded Spoils update.[133][134]

In July 2020, Rare announced that Sea of Thieves had passed 15 million players. Over 3.3 million players played in June 2020. 1 million players had purchased the game on Steam since its launch on June 3, 2020.[135]

Accolades[edit]

Year Award Category Result Ref
2016 Game Critics Awards Best of Show Nominated [136]
Best Original Game Nominated
Best Online Multiplayer Nominated
Gamescom 2016 Best Xbox One Game Won [137]
Best Social/Online Game Nominated
Best Multiplayer Game Won
Golden Joystick Awards Most Wanted Game Nominated [138]
2017 Game Critics Awards Best Original Game Nominated [139]
Best Online Multiplayer Nominated
Golden Joystick Awards Most Wanted Game Nominated [140]
2018 Develop Awards Animation Nominated [141]
Visual Design Nominated
Music Design Nominated
Sound Design Nominated
Gameplay Innovation Nominated
The Independent Game Developers' Association Awards 2018 Best Action and Adventure Game Nominated [142][143]
Creativity Award Nominated
Best Audio Design Nominated
Visual Design Won
Golden Joystick Awards Best Audio Design Nominated [144][145]
Best Co-operative Game Nominated
Xbox Game of the Year Nominated
The Game Awards 2018 Best Multiplayer Game Nominated [146]
Titanium Awards Best Artistic Design Nominated [147][148]
Best Social/Family Game Won
Australian Games Awards Multiplayer/Online Title of the Year Nominated [149]
2019 D.I.C.E. Awards Online Game of the Year Nominated [150]
NAVGTR Awards Design, New IP Nominated [151]
Game, Original Action Nominated
15th British Academy Games Awards Evolving Game Nominated [152]
Multiplayer Nominated
Italian Video Game Awards Innovation Award Nominated [153]
Ivor Novello Awards Best Original Video Game Score Won [154]
The Independent Game Developers' Association Awards 2019 Best Social Game Nominated [155]
Golden Joystick Awards Best Game Expansion (Anniversary Update) Nominated [156]

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External links[edit]