Sean Longden

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Sean Longden (born 1965 in Clapham, Bedfordshire, England) is an author and historian who specialises in British social history during World War II,[1] his work extensively uses oral history interviews and first person accounts.[2] He was educated at Sharnbrook Upper School and The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), University College London.

Bibliography[edit]

  • To the Victor the Spoils (Arris Books, 2004).
A social history of the British Army between D-Day and VE Day includes stories about the sex life, crime and fashion of soldiers in the British Army.
  • Hitler's British Slaves (Arris Books, 2006).
This book deals with the brutal treatment of British POWs who worked in German agriculture and industry during World War Two. The book overturns the "Great Escape Myth" that most prisoners lived in POW camps which were a cross between a harsh boarding school and a holiday camp.
  • Dunkirk, The Men They Left Behind (Constable Robinson, 2008).
A history of the 40,000 soldiers of the British Expeditionary Force who were left behind following the evacuation of the BEF from the port of Dunkirk in France in 1940.
The first history of the secret[3] World War II British Army unit Target Forces, also known as T-Force, that was created in 1945 to search for German military researchers and scientists. T-Force's creation was inspired by the work of Ian Fleming who had previously helped to found the Royal Marine unit 30AU, which did similar work in France in 1944.
A history of the experience of English children during World War II, this book includes accounts evacuation, blackout, rationing and air raids.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sean Longden biography". Andrew Lownie Literary Agency. Retrieved 26 December 2015. 
  2. ^ "Alumni Pages - Sean Longden". Sharnbrook Upper School. 28 November 2013. Retrieved 26 December 2015. 
  3. ^ MacFarlane, Tim (2 June 2015). "Inside Churchill's T-Force". Daily Mail online. Retrieved 26 December 2015. 
  4. ^ Gardiner, Juliet (29 March 2012). "Review - Blitz Kids: The Children's War Against Hitler". HistoryExtra. Retrieved 26 December 2015.