Seattle Fire Department

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Seattle Fire Department
City of Seattle Fire Department Logo.svg
Operational area
Country  United States
State  Washington
City Seattle
Agency overview[1][2]
Annual calls 81,733 (2012)
Employees
  • 1,065 total (2012)
  • - 981 uniformed
  • - 84 civilian
Staffing Career
IAFF 27
Facilities and equipment[2][3]
Divisions 1
Battalions 5
Stations 34
Engines 32
Trucks 1
Tillers 10
Rescues 1
Ambulances
HAZMAT 1
USAR 1
Fireboats 4
Rescue boats 2
Light and air 3
Website
Official website
IAFF website

The Seattle Fire Department provides fire protection and emergency medical services to the city of Seattle, Washington. The department is responsible for an area of 84 square miles (220 km2), including 193 miles (311 km) of waterfront with a population of over 634,000.[2]

History[edit]

The Seattle Fire Department got its start as a volunteer fire department that was taken over by the City of Seattle on April 11, 1884.[4] On June 6, 1889 the Great Seattle Fire broke out and destroyed over 64 acres (26 ha) of the city. Insurance investigators charged the city with not having adequately trained firefighters to provide protection for the residents.[4] As a result, the Seattle Fire Department was officially established on October 17, 1889 as a paid professional department.

Stations and apparatus[edit]

Seattle Firefighters put out a cargo container fire in the Port of Seattle
Seattle Fire Department Engine 25
Seattle Fire Department Ladder 6
Seattle Fire Department Medic 80
Seattle Fire Department Battalion 6

As of June 2015 the department operates out of 34 fire stations spread across the city.[5] In addition to these stations, the department has two ALS units stationed at the Harborview Medical Center.

Neighborhood Engine Ladder EMS Special Chief Battalion
2 Belltown Engine 2
Engine 5
Ladder 4 (Tiller) Aid 2 2
3 Commodore Marina Chief Seattle Fireboat 7
5 Terminal 91 Leschi Fireboat, Fireboat 1 7
6 Central District Engine 6 Ladder 3 (Tiller) 5
8 Queen Anne Engine 8 Ladder 6 (Tiller) 4
9 Fremont Engine 9 Air Unit 4
10 Downtown Engine 10 Ladder 1 (Tiller) Aid 5, Aid 10 Air 9, HazMat 1 2
11 Highland Park Engine 11 7
13 Beacon Hill Engine 13 5
14 SoDo Ladder 7 Aid 14 Rescue 1, Squad 14 5
16 Green Lake Engine 16 6
17 University District Engine 17 Ladder 9 (Tiller) Medic 16 Battalion 6 6
18 Ballard Engine 18 Ladder 8 (Tiller) Medic 18 Hose/Foam Unit Battalion 4 4
20 Interbay Engine 20 4
21 Greenwood Engine 21 MCI 1 4
22 Montlake Engine 22 Mobile Command Unit 6
24 Bitter Lake Engine 24 Air 240 4
25 Capitol Hill Engine 25 Ladder 10 (Tiller) Aid 25 Mobile Ventilation Unit, Purple K Unit Battalion 2 2
26 South Park Engine 26 Air 260 7
27 Georgetown Engine 27 Metro Medical Strike Team
USAR, DECON 1, REHAB 1
5
28 Rainier Valley Engine 28 Ladder 12 (Tiller) Medic 28 5
29 Alki Point Engine 29 Battalion 7 7
30 Mount Baker Engine 30 Battalion 5 5
31 Northgate Engine 31 Ladder 5 (Tiller) Medic 31 6
32 West Seattle Engine 32 Ladder 11 (Tiller) Medic 32 7
33 Rainier Beach Engine 33 5
34 Madison Park Engine 34 Hose/Foam Unit 2
35 Crown Hill Engine 35 4
36 Harbor Island Engine 36 Marine Incident Unit 7
37 High Point Engine 37 7
38 Laurelhurst Engine 38 6
39 Lake City Engine 39 6
40 Wedgwood Engine 40 6
41 Magnolia Engine 41 4
HMC Harborview Medical
Center
Medic 1
Medic 10
Medic44
EMS Supervisor

Notable Incidents[edit]

Great Seattle Fire[edit]

Main article: Great Seattle Fire

On June 6, 1889, the Great Seattle Fire broke out in a cabinet shop located at the corner of 1st Avenue and Madison Street.[4] The flames spread rapidly and the small volunteer department was unable to slow the fire with the town's small water systems. By the time the fire was extinguished, 64 acres (26 ha) of homes and businesses had been destroyed.[4]

In popular culture[edit]

  • In the 1965 film, The Slender Thread, starring Sidney Poitier and Anne Bancroft, the Seattle Fire Department dispatch center, as well as the interior of Fire Station # 2 are shown and Aid Unit 2 is seen responding to a report of a suicide attempt.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Emergency Response Totals". Seattle Fire Department. Retrieved 22 June 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c "Department Profile". Seattle Fire Department. Retrieved 22 June 2015. 
  3. ^ "Apparatus Showcase". Seattle Fire Department. Retrieved 22 June 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c d Stein, Alan (2 September 2002). "Seattle Fire Department is created on October 17, 1889.". HistoryLink. Retrieved 22 June 2015. 
  5. ^ "Stations". Seattle Fire Department. Retrieved 22 June 2015. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 47°36′00″N 122°19′55″W / 47.60000°N 122.33194°W / 47.60000; -122.33194