Seattle Fire Department

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Seattle Fire Department
City of Seattle Fire Department Logo.svg
Operational area
Country United States
State Washington
CitySeattle
Agency overview[1][2]
Annual calls94,346 (2015)
Employees
  • 1,065 total (2012)
  • - 981 uniformed
  • - 84 civilian
StaffingCareer
IAFF27
Facilities and equipment[2][3]
Divisions1
Battalions6
Stations34
Engines32
Trucks11
Squads2
Rescues2
Ambulances
HAZMAT1
USAR1
Wildland1
Fireboats4
Rescue boats2
Light and air3
Website
Official website
IAFF website

The Seattle Fire Department provides fire protection and emergency medical services to the city of Seattle, Washington, United States. The department is responsible for an area of 142.5 square miles (369 km2), including 193 miles (311 km) of waterfront, with a population of 713,700.[2]

History[edit]

Seattle Volunteer Fire Company Engine Number 1 in 1883 at the engine house on Columbia Street in a Theodore Peiser photograph

The Seattle Fire Department got its start as a volunteer fire department that was taken over by the City of Seattle on April 11, 1884.[4] On June 6, 1889 the Great Seattle Fire broke out and destroyed over 64 acres (26 ha) of the city. Insurance investigators charged the city with not having adequately trained firefighters to provide protection for the residents.[4] As a result, the Seattle Fire Department was officially established on October 17, 1889 as a paid professional department.

Fire Stations/Apparatus[edit]

Seattle firefighters put out a cargo container fire in the Port of Seattle.
Seattle Fire Department Engine 25
Seattle Fire Department Ladder 6
Seattle Fire Department Medic 80
Seattle Fire Department Battalion 6

As of June 2015 the department operates out of 34 fire stations spread across the city.[5]

Station # Location Address Apparatus/Callsigns
2 Belltown 2320 4th Ave. A2, A4, E2, L4
3 Fishermen's Terminal 1735 W Thurman St. FB1, FB3
5 Waterfront 925 Alaskan Way E5, FB2, FB4, FRB5
6 Central District 405 M L King Jr. Way. S E6, L3
8 Queen Anne 110 Lee St. E8, L6
9 Fremont 3829 Linden Ave. N E9
10 Pioneer Square 400 S Washington St. E10, L1, HAZ1, AIR10, A5, A10, DEP1, STAF10
11 Highland Park 1514 SW Holden St. E11
13 Beacon Hill 3601 Beacon Ave. S E13, B5
14 SoDo 3224 4th Ave. S L7, R1, R80, A14, SQ14
16 Greenlake 6846 Oswego Pl. NE E16
17 University District 1050 NE 50th St. E17, L9, B6, M17
18 Ballard 1521 NW Market St. E18, L8, B4, M18, HOSE18
20 Interbay 2800 15th Ave. W E20
21 Greenwood 7304 Greenwood Ave. N E21, MCI1
22 Montlake 901 E Roanoke St. E22, COMVAN
24 Bitter Lake 401 N 130th St. E24, AIR240
25 Capitol Hill 1300 E Pine St. E25, L10, A25, MVU1, P25, B2
26 South Park 800 S Cloverdale St. E26, AIR260,AIR 26,
27 Georgetown 1000 S Myrtle St. E27, DECON1, REHAB1
28 Rainier Valley 5968 Rainier Ave. S E28, L12, M28, MMST, USAR1
29 Admiral District 2139 Ferry Ave. SW E29
30 Mount Baker 2931 S Mount Baker Blvd E30, MCI2
31 Northgate 1319 N Northgate Way E31, L5, M31, A31
32 West Seattle 3715 SW Alaska St. E32, L11,B7, M32
33 Rainier Beach 9645 Renton Ave. S E33
34 Madison Park 633 32nd Ave. E E34, HOSE34
35 Crown Hill 8729 15th Ave. NW E35
36 Harbor Island 3600 23rd Ave. SW E36, MARINE1, MARINE80 (Reserve Marine)
37 High Point 7700 35th Ave. SW E37
38 Laurelhurst 4004 NE 55th St. E38, E85 (Reserve Engine), SQ40 (Wildland Firefighting Apparatus)
39 Lake City 2806 NE 127th St. E39, MAB1
40 Wedgwood 9401 35th Ave. NE E40
41 Magnolia 2416 34th Ave. W E41
HMC Harborview Medical Center 325 9th Ave. M1, M10, M44 & M45(EMS Supervisors), M80 (Reserve Medic Unit), B3 (EMS Battalion Chief)
HQ Headquarters 310 2nd Ave. S DEP1, SAFT2 , MAR5,MAR1,

Apparatus Glossary/Callsigns[edit]

  • Engine (E)
  • Ladder (L)
  • Aid - BLS (A)
  • Air Unit (AIR10 / AIR26)
  • Battalion Chief (B)
  • Chaplain units (CHAP3, CHAP4, CHAP5, CHAP7)
  • Command, Control & Communication Unit (COM1)
  • Decontamination Unit (DECON1)
  • Deputy Chief (DEP1, DEP11)
  • EMS/Paramedic Supervisor (M44 / M45)
  • Fire Boat (FB)
  • Fire Chief (234)
  • Assistant Chief of Operations (89)
  • Fire Investigation Unit (FIU) / Fire Marshall (MAR1, MAR5, MAR55)
  • Fire Rescue Boat (FRB)
  • Hazardous Materials Unit (HAZ1)
  • Hose / Foam Wagon (HOSE18 / HOSE34)
  • Marine Unit (MARINE1)
  • Medic - Advanced life support (M)
  • Medical Ambulance Bus (MAB1)
  • Metropolitan Medical Strike Team (MMST)
  • Mobile Air Compressor (AIR240 / AIR260)
  • Mobile Ventilation Unit (MVU1)
  • Mass Casualty Incident Unit (MCI1 / MCI2)
  • Power/CO2 Unit (P25)
  • Public Information Officer Unit (PIO)
  • Reserve Aid - BLS Apparatus (All "80 Series" Designations) (A84)
  • Reserve Battalion Chief (B22, B33, B44, B55, B66, B77)
  • Reserve Engine Apparatus (All "80 Series" Designations) (E85)
  • Reserve Ladder Apparatus (All "80 Series" Designations) (L84)
  • Reserve Medic - ALS Apparatus (All "80 Series" Designations) (M80)
  • Reserve Heavy Rescue Apparatus (All "80 Series" Designations) (R80)
  • Seattle Police Harbor Patrol Boat (Responds with Seattle Fire Department for most marine incidents) (PTRL4)
  • Squad & Wildland Unit (SQ40)
  • Staff & Incident Command System (ICS) Support Unit (STAF10)
  • Safety Chief (SAFT2)
  • Technical Rescue Unit (R)
  • Rehabilitation (REHAB1)
  • Urban Search & Rescue Unit (USAR1)

Notable incidents[edit]

Great Seattle Fire[edit]

On June 6, 1889, the Great Seattle Fire broke out in a cabinet shop located at the corner of 1st Avenue and Madison Street.[4] The flames spread rapidly and the small volunteer department was unable to slow the fire with the town's small water systems. By the time the fire was extinguished, 64 acres (26 ha) of homes and businesses had been destroyed.[4]

Pang warehouse fire[edit]

On January 5, 1995, the Mary Pang's Food Products warehouse burned in the International District. Four firefighters died when the floor of the warehouse collapsed. It was later determined that the fire was set by Martin Pang, the son of the owner. Seattle's Fallen Firefighters Memorial was built to remember the four who perished.[6]

In popular culture[edit]

The House on the Hill (1985)
  • In the 1965 film, The Slender Thread, starring Sidney Poitier and Anne Bancroft, the Seattle Fire Department dispatch center, as well as the interior of Fire Station # 2 are shown and Aid Unit 2 is seen responding to a report of a suicide attempt.
  • In 1979, in the Emergency! TV series' movie-of-the-week Most Deadly Passage, the main characters visit Seattle for a ride-along with Medic One.
  • In 1985, the department released a cartoon film on fire safety, named The House on the Hill.
  • The 2018 ABC television series Station 19, another spinoff of the Seattle-set medical drama Grey's Anatomy, is set in the Department and is the first ever TV series to feature it.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Emergency Response Totals". Seattle Fire Department. Retrieved 22 June 2015.
  2. ^ a b c "Department Profile". Seattle Fire Department. Retrieved 22 June 2015.
  3. ^ "Apparatus Showcase". Seattle Fire Department. Retrieved 22 June 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d Stein, Alan (2 September 2002). "Seattle Fire Department is created on October 17, 1889". HistoryLink. Retrieved 22 June 2015.
  5. ^ "Stations". Seattle Fire Department. Retrieved 22 June 2015.
  6. ^ "10 years ago, four perished in Pang warehouse blaze". seattlepi.com. 4 Jan 2005. Retrieved 7 November 2016.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 47°36′00″N 122°19′55″W / 47.60000°N 122.33194°W / 47.60000; -122.33194