Second Drees cabinet

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Second Drees cabinet
Third Drees cabinet
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
45th cabinet of the Netherlands
Kabinet 1952-09-02 - SFA003001475.jpg ZetelsDreesII.svg
The first meeting of the Second Drees cabinet on 2 September 1952
Date formed2 September 1952 (1952-09-02)
Date dissolved13 October 1956 (1956-10-13)
(Demissionary from 13 June 1956 (1956-06-13))
People and organisations
Head of stateQueen Juliana
Head of governmentWillem Drees
Deputy head of governmentLouis Beel
No. of ministers17
Ministers removed
(Death/resignation/dismissal)
3
Total no. of ministers16
Member partyLabour Party
(PvdA)
Catholic People's Party
(KVP)
Anti-Revolutionary Party
(ARP)
Christian Historical Union
(CHU)
Status in legislatureGrand coalition (Roman/Red)
Opposition partyPeople's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Opposition leaderPieter Oud
History
Election(s)1952 election
Outgoing election1956 election
Legislature term(s)1952–1956
Incoming formation1952 formation
Outgoing formation1956 formation
PredecessorFirst Drees cabinet
SuccessorThird Drees cabinet
Azure, billetty Or a lion with a coronet Or armed and langued Gules holding in his dexter paw a sword Argent hilted Or and in the sinister paw seven arrows Argent pointed and bound together Or. [The seven arrows stand for the seven provinces of the Union of Utrecht.] The shield is crowned with the (Dutch) royal crown and supported by two lions Or armed and langued gules. They stand on a scroll Azure with the text (Or) "Je Maintiendrai" (French for "I will maintain".)
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The Second Drees cabinet, also called the Third Drees cabinet[1] was the cabinet of the Netherlands from 2 September 1952 until 13 October 1956. The cabinet was formed by the political parties Labour Party (PvdA), Catholic People's Party (KVP), Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP) and the Christian Historical Union (CHU) after the election of 1952. The grand coalition (Roman/Red) cabinet was a majority cabinet in the House of Representatives.[2]

Term[edit]

The economic recovery after World War II continued. This made further expansion of social security possible, of which the best example is the institution of the state pension AOW in 1956. Also, a major housing scheme was executed, building 80 000 houses per year.

A major setback was the North Sea flood of 1953, which resulted in damage equivalent to 5% of the GDP. An emergency law was made to recover the dykes and plans were made for the Delta Works, the world's largest flood protection project, which should protect the South West Netherlands against another such combination of storm and spring tide.

An episcopal 'mandement' called for Catholics to give up their PvdA-membership, but without result.

The 29 December 1952 Statute for the kingdom granted Surinam and the Netherlands Antilles a certain degree of independence within the kingdom.

On 15 February 1956 the Dutch-Indonesian Union officially ended. Relationships between the two countries continued to deteriorate.

When the PvdA voted with the opposition over a combined law to lower taxes and raise rents on 17 May 1955, this led to a crisis. The cabinet fell, but returned after 17 days when PvdA chairman Burger had reconciled the parties.

Cabinet Members[edit]

Ministers Title/Ministry Term of office Party
Willem Drees Dr.
Willem Drees
(1886–1988)
Prime Minister General Affairs 7 August 1948 –
22 December 1958
[Retained]
Labour Party
Louis Beel Dr.
Louis Beel
(1902–1977)
Deputy Prime Minister Interior 2 September 1952 –
7 July 1956
[Res]
Catholic People's Party
Minister 6 December 1951 –
7 July 1956
[Retained] [Res]
Julius Christiaan van Oven Dr.
Julius Christiaan
van Oven

(1881–1963)
7 July 1956 –
13 October 1956
[Ad interim]
Labour Party
Johan Beyen Johan Beyen
(1897–1976)
Minister Foreign Affairs 2 September 1952 –
13 October 1956
Independent
Liberal

(Conservative Liberal)
Jo van de Kieft Jo van de Kieft
(1884–1970)
Minister Finance 2 September 1952 –
13 October 1956
Labour Party
Leendert Antonie Donker Leendert Antonie Donker
(1899–1956)
Minister Justice 2 September 1952 –
4 February 1956
[Died]
Labour Party
Louis Beel Dr.
Louis Beel
(1902–1977)
4 February 1956 –
15 February 1956
[Ad interim]
Catholic People's Party
Julius Christiaan van Oven Dr.
Julius Christiaan
van Oven

(1881–1963)
15 February 1956 –
13 October 1956
Labour Party
Jelle Zijlstra Dr.
Jelle Zijlstra
(1918–2001)
Minister Economic Affairs 2 September 1952 –
19 May 1959
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Kees Staf Kees Staf
(1905–1973)
Minister War 15 March 1951 –
19 May 1959
[Retained]
Christian Historical Union
Navy
Ko Suurhoff Ko Suurhoff
(1905–1967)
Minister Social Affairs and Health 2 September 1952 –
22 December 1958
Labour Party
Jo Cals Jo Cals
(1914–1971)
Minister Education, Arts
and Sciences
2 September 1952 –
7 November 1961
Catholic People's Party
Jacob Algera Jacob Algera
(1902–1966)
Minister Transport and
Water Management
2 September 1952 –
10 October 1958
Anti-Revolutionary Party
Sicco Mansholt Dr.
Sicco Mansholt
(1908–1995)
Minister Agriculture, Fisheries
and Food Supplies
25 June 1945 –
1 January 1958
[Retained]
Labour Party
Herman Witte Herman Witte
(1909–1973)
Minister Reconstruction and
Housing
2 September 1952 –
13 October 1956
Catholic People's Party
Louis Beel Dr.
Louis Beel
(1902–1977)
Minister Social Work 2 September 1952 –
9 September 1952
[Ad interim]
Catholic People's Party
Frans-Jozef van Thiel Frans-Jozef van Thiel
(1906–1993)
9 September 1952 –
13 October 1956
Catholic People's Party
Willem Kernkamp Dr.
Willem Kernkamp
(1899–1956)
Minister Colonial Affairs 2 September 1952 –
18 July 1956
[Died]
Christian Historical Union
Kees Staf Kees Staf
(1905–1973)
18 July 1956 –
16 February 1957
[Ad interim]
Christian Historical Union
Ministers without portfolio Title/Portfolio/Ministry Term of office Party
A. C. de Bruijn A. C. de Bruijn
(1887–1968)
Minister • Economic Policy

(within Interior)
2 September 1952 –
13 October 1956
Catholic People's Party
Joseph Luns Dr.
Joseph Luns
(1911–2002)
Minister • Foreign Policy

(within Foreign Affairs)
2 September 1952 –
13 October 1956
Catholic People's Party
State Secretaries Title/Portfolio/Ministry Term of office Party
Willem Hendrik van den Berge Dr.
Willem Hendrik
van den Berge

(1905–1987)
State Secretary • Fiscal Affairs
• Tax and Customs Administration

(within Finance)
2 February 1953 –
13 October 1956
Independent
Social Democrat
Gerard Veldkamp Dr.
Gerard Veldkamp
(1921–1990)
State Secretary • Small Business Policy
• Retail Policy
• Competition Policy
• Tourism Affairs

(within Economic Affairs)
10 October 1952 –
17 July 1961
Catholic People's Party
Ferdinand Kranenburg Ferdinand Kranenburg
(1911–1994)
State Secretary • Army
• Air Force

(within Defence)
1 June 1951 –
1 June 1958
[Retained]
Labour Party
Harry Moorman Harry Moorman
(1899–1971)
• Navy

(within Navy)
1 May 1949 –
19 May 1959
[Retained]
Catholic People's Party
Aat van Rhijn Dr.
Aat van Rhijn
(1892–1986)
State Secretary • Social Security
• Unemployment Affairs
• Occupational Safety
• Social Services
• Poverty Policy


(within Social Affairs
and Health)
15 September 1951 –
22 December 1958
[Retained]
Labour Party
Piet Muntendam Dr.
Piet Muntendam
(1901–1986)
State Secretary • Elderly Policy
• Disability Affairs
• Veteran Affairs
• Minority Affairs
• Medical Ethics Policy

(within Social Affairs
and Health)
15 September 1951 –
1 October 1953
[Retained] [Res]
Labour Party
Anna de Waal Dr.
Anna de Waal
(1906–1981)
State Secretary • Primary Education
• Secondary Education
• Special Education

(within Education, Arts
and Sciences
)
2 February 1953 –
16 March 1957
[Res]
Catholic People's Party
Source: ‹See Tfd›(in Dutch) Rijksoverheid
Retained Retained this position from the previous cabinet.
Res Resigned.
Ad interim Served ad interim.
Died Died in office.

References[edit]

  1. ^ According to a different numbering this was the Fourth Drees cabinet because it was the third cabinet with Willem Drees as Prime Minister.
  2. ^ "Coalities tussen sociaaldemocraten en confessionelen" (in Dutch). Historisch Nieuwsblad. 10 August 2006. Retrieved 24 April 2018.

External links[edit]

Official