Second Major ministry

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Second Major ministry
1992–1997
Major PM full.jpg
Major (1996)
Date formed 9 April 1992 (1992-04-09)
Date dissolved 2 May 1997 (1997-05-02)
People and organisations
Monarch Elizabeth II
Prime Minister John Major
Prime Minister's history 1990–1997
Deputy Prime Minister Michael Heseltine (1995–1997)
Total no. of ministers 274 appointments
Member party Conservative Party
Status in legislature
Opposition cabinet
Opposition party Labour Party
Opposition leader
History
Election(s) 1992 general election
Outgoing election 1997 general election
Legislature term(s) 51st UK Parliament
Predecessor First Major ministry
Successor First Blair ministry

John Major formed the second Major ministry following the 1992 general election after being invited by Queen Elizabeth II to begin a new government. His government fell into minority status on 13 December 1996.[1]

Formation[edit]

The change of leader from Margaret Thatcher to John Major saw a dramatic turnaround in Tory support, with the double-digit lead in the opinion polls for the Labour Party being replaced by a narrow Conservative one by the turn of 1991. Although a general election did not have to be held until June 1992, Labour leader Neil Kinnock kept pressurising Major to hold an election during 1991, but Major resisted the calls and there was no election that year.

The recession which began in the autumn of 1990 deepened during 1991, with unemployment standing at nearly 2.5 million by December 1991, compared to 1.6 million just 18 months earlier. Despite this, Tory support in the opinion polls remained relatively strong, with any Labour lead now being by the narrowest of margins, although Labour still made some gains at the expense of the Tories in local elections, and seized the Monmouth seat from the Tories in a by-election.

Major finally called an election for 9 April 1992 which ended the first Major ministry. In a surprise to most pollsters, Major won the election, which led to the formation of the Second Major Ministry and a fourth consecutive Conservative term in office.

There was widespread media and public debate as to whether the Labour Party could ever win a general election again, as they had failed to do so in 1992, despite the Conservative government having been in power for over a decade and presiding over a recession for the second time. At the same time, there was much private debate (made public many years later in the memoirs of senior figures including John Major himself) within the Conservative government as to whether a fifth successive general election victory was a realistic possibility.

The new term of parliament saw Major gain a new opponent in John Smith, who succeeded Neil Kinnock as Labour leader.

However, the months which followed the 1992 general election saw a series of events which went a long way towards deciding the outcome of the next general election long before it was even on the political horizon.

Fate[edit]

On Wednesday 16 September 1992, the pound sterling crashed out of the European Exchange Rate Mechanism after Chancellor of the Exchequer Norman Lamont had invested heavily in trying to keep it there, adjusting interest rates four times in one day as a desperate measure, an event which became known as Black Wednesday, leaving the Conservative government's reputation for economic excellence in tatters. Labour was soon ascendant in the opinion polls, and next few years brought a string of heavy defeats for the Conservatives in local council elections and parliamentary by-elections, with both Labour and the Liberal Democrats benefiting at their expense.

Internal Conservative Party feuding on Europe and the government defeat on the Maastricht Treaty further dented the government's popularity, as did coal mine closures announced in late 1992, and a series of scandals involving MPs.

The end of the recession was declared in April 1993 after nearly three years, and unemployment – which had peaked at nearly 3,000,000 people by the end of 1992 – quickly began to fall. It had fallen below 2,500,000 within two years of the recession's end, and by the end of 1996 it was below the 2,000,000 mark. Freed from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism, the British economy outperformed the rest of the continent for the first time in a generation.

However, the strong economic recovery failed to make much difference to the dismal Conservative performance in the opinion polls. Labour leader John Smith died of a sudden heart attack in May 1994 and was succeeded by Tony Blair, who continued the modernisation process of the party which began under Smith's predecessor Neil Kinnock, by branding the party as: "New Labour", and by the end of that year the opinion polls were showing Labour support as high as 60% – putting them more than 30 points ahead of the Conservatives.

With the Conservative government remaining divided on Europe and much more, John Major, in an attempt to silence his critics and opponents, announced his resignation as party leader – but not as Prime Minister – in June 1995, triggering a leadership election. He was opposed by John Redwood, the Secretary of State for Wales, and Major won the leadership election without much difficulty.

The Conservative majority of 21 seats was gradually eroded by a string of by-election defeats as well as the defection of one MP to Labour, and by the turn of 1997; the Conservatives were without a majority in the House of Commons.

John Major left it until the last possible moment before calling a general election, finally holding it on Thursday 1 May 1997. He pinned his hopes of election success on a six-week campaign exposing New Labour's policies to scrutiny, as well as pointing towards a booming economy and falling unemployment. However, as the Conservatives had denied responsibility for the recession at the turn of the decade, few voters were willing to give them credit for the economic recovery, and Labour returned to power after eighteen years in opposition, with a 179-seat majority that saw several powerful Conservative figures (most notably Michael Portillo, widely tipped to be the next Leader of the Conservative Party) lose their seats and the loss of all Conservative seats in Wales and Scotland; the Conservatives subsequently suffered their worst general election result of the twentieth century and their place in government was taken by Labour, led by Tony Blair, after four successive parliamentary terms of Conservative Party rule.[2]

The Conservatives did not return to government until 2010, and did not win a parliamentary majority until 2015, having had to form a coalition with the Liberal Democrats in order to form their first government under David Cameron.

Cabinet[edit]

April 1992 to May 1993[edit]

Second Major Cabinet[3]
Portfolio Minister Term
Cabinet ministers
Prime Minister
First Lord of the Treasury
Minister for the Civil Service
The Rt Hon. John Major MP 1990–97
Lord Chancellor The Rt Hon. The Lord Mackay of Clashfern 1987–97
Chancellor of the Exchequer The Rt Hon. Norman Lamont MP 1990–93
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs The Rt Hon. Douglas Hurd MP 1989–95
Home Secretary The Rt Hon. Kenneth Clarke MP 1992–93
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food The Rt Hon. John Gummer MP 1989–93
Secretary of State for Defence The Rt Hon. Malcolm Rifkind MP 1992–95
Secretary of State for Education The Rt Hon. John Patten MP 1992–94
Secretary of State for Employment The Rt Hon. Gillian Shephard MP 1992–93
Secretary of State for National Heritage The Rt Hon. David Mellor MP 1992–92
The Rt Hon. Peter Brooke MP 1992–94
Secretary of State for the Environment The Rt Hon. Michael Howard MP 1992–93
Secretary of State for Health The Rt Hon. Virginia Bottomley MP 1992–95
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland The Rt Hon. Sir Patrick Mayhew MP 1992–97
Lord President of the Council
Leader of the House of Commons
The Rt Hon. Tony Newton MP 1992–97
Lord Privy Seal
Leader of the House of Lords
The Rt Hon. The Lord Wakeham 1992–94
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster The Rt Hon. William Waldegrave MP 1992–94
Secretary of State for Social Security The Rt Hon. Peter Lilley MP 1992–97
Secretary of State for Scotland The Rt Hon. Ian Lang MP 1990–95
Secretary of State for Trade and Industry
President of the Board of Trade
The Rt Hon. Michael Heseltine MP 1992–95
Secretary of State for Transport The Rt Hon. John MacGregor MP 1992–94
Chief Secretary to the Treasury The Rt Hon. Michael Portillo MP 1992–94
Secretary of State for Wales The Rt Hon. David Hunt MP 1990–93
Also attending cabinet meetings
Chairman of the Conservative Party The Rt Hon. Norman Fowler MP 1992–94
Chief Whip
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury
The Rt Hon. Richard Ryder MP 1990–95

Changes[edit]

  • On 24 September 1992 David Mellor resigns as Secretary of State for National Heritage following tabloid reporting of an affair with actress Antonia de Sancha. He was replaced by Peter Brooke.[4]

May 1993 to July 1994[edit]

Third Major Cabinet[3]
Portfolio Minister Term
Cabinet ministers
Prime Minister
First Lord of the Treasury
Minister for the Civil Service
The Rt Hon. John Major MP 1990–97
Lord Chancellor The Rt Hon. The Lord Mackay of Clashfern 1987–97
Chancellor of the Exchequer The Rt Hon. Kenneth Clarke MP 1993–97
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs The Rt Hon. Douglas Hurd MP 1989–95
Home Secretary The Rt Hon. Michael Howard MP 1993–97
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food The Rt Hon. Gillian Shephard MP 1993–94
Secretary of State for Defence The Rt Hon. Malcolm Rifkind MP 1992–95
Secretary of State for Education The Rt Hon. John Patten MP 1992–94
Secretary of State for Employment The Rt Hon. David Hunt MP 1993–94
Secretary of State for National Heritage The Rt Hon. Peter Brooke MP 1992–94
Secretary of State for the Environment The Rt Hon. John Gummer MP 1993–97
Secretary of State for Health The Rt Hon. Virginia Bottomley MP 1992–95
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland The Rt Hon. Sir Patrick Mayhew MP 1992–97
Lord President of the Council
Leader of the House of Commons
The Rt Hon. Tony Newton MP 1992–97
Lord Privy Seal
Leader of the House of Lords
The Rt Hon. The Lord Wakeham 1992–94
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster The Rt Hon. William Waldegrave MP 1992–94
Secretary of State for Social Security The Rt Hon. Peter Lilley MP 1992–97
Secretary of State for Scotland The Rt Hon. Ian Lang MP 1990–95
Secretary of State for Trade and Industry
President of the Board of Trade
The Rt Hon. Michael Heseltine MP 1992–95
Secretary of State for Transport The Rt Hon. John MacGregor MP 1992–94
Chief Secretary to the Treasury The Rt Hon. Michael Portillo MP 1992–94
Secretary of State for Wales The Rt Hon. John Redwood MP 1993–95
Also attending cabinet meetings
Chairman of the Conservative Party The Rt Hon. Norman Fowler MP 1992–94
Chief Whip
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury
The Rt Hon. Richard Ryder MP 1990–95

July 1994 to July 1995[edit]

Fourth Major Cabinet[3]
Portfolio Minister Term
Cabinet ministers
Prime Minister
First Lord of the Treasury
Minister for the Civil Service
The Rt Hon. John Major MP 1990–97
Lord Chancellor The Rt Hon. The Lord Mackay of Clashfern 1987–97
Chancellor of the Exchequer The Rt Hon. Kenneth Clarke MP 1993–97
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs The Rt Hon. Douglas Hurd MP 1989–95
Home Secretary The Rt Hon. Michael Howard MP 1993–97
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food The Rt Hon. William Waldegrave MP 1994–95
Secretary of State for Defence The Rt Hon. Malcolm Rifkind MP 1992–95
Secretary of State for Education The Rt Hon. Gillian Shephard MP 1994–95
Secretary of State for Employment The Rt Hon. Michael Portillo MP 1994–95
Secretary of State for National Heritage The Rt Hon. Stephen Dorrell MP 1994–95
Secretary of State for the Environment The Rt Hon. John Gummer MP 1993–97
Secretary of State for Health The Rt Hon. Virginia Bottomley MP 1992–95
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland The Rt Hon. Sir Patrick Mayhew MP 1992–97
Lord President of the Council
Leader of the House of Commons
The Rt Hon. Tony Newton MP 1992–97
Lord Privy Seal
Leader of the House of Lords
The Rt Hon. Viscount Cranborne 1994–97
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster The Rt Hon. David Hunt MP 1994–95
Secretary of State for Social Security The Rt Hon. Peter Lilley MP 1992–97
Secretary of State for Scotland The Rt Hon. Ian Lang MP 1990–95
Secretary of State for Trade and Industry
President of the Board of Trade
The Rt Hon. Michael Heseltine MP 1992–95
Secretary of State for Transport The Rt Hon. Brian Mawhinney MP 1994–95
Chief Secretary to the Treasury The Rt Hon. Jonathan Aitken MP 1994–95
Secretary of State for Wales The Rt Hon. John Redwood MP 1993–95
Minister without portfolio
Chairman of the Conservative Party
The Rt Hon. Jeremy Hanley MP 1994–95
Also attending cabinet meetings
Chief Whip
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury
The Rt Hon. Richard Ryder MP 1990–95

July 1995 to May 1997[edit]

Fifth Major Cabinet[3]
Portfolio Minister Term
Cabinet ministers
Prime Minister
First Lord of the Treasury
Minister for the Civil Service
The Rt Hon. John Major MP 1990–97
First Secretary of State
Deputy Prime Minister
The Rt Hon. Michael Heseltine 1995–97
Lord Chancellor The Rt Hon. The Lord Mackay of Clashfern 1987–97
Chancellor of the Exchequer The Rt Hon. Kenneth Clarke MP 1993–97
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs The Rt Hon. Malcolm Rifkind MP 1995–97
Home Secretary The Rt Hon. Michael Howard MP 1993–97
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food The Rt Hon. Douglas Hogg MP 1995–97
Secretary of State for Defence The Rt Hon. Michael Portillo MP 1995–97
Secretary of State for Education and Employment The Rt Hon. Gillian Shephard MP 1995–97
Secretary of State for National Heritage The Rt Hon. Virginia Bottomley MP 1995–97
Secretary of State for the Environment The Rt Hon. John Gummer MP 1993–97
Secretary of State for Health The Rt Hon. Stephen Dorrell MP 1995–97
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland The Rt Hon. Sir Patrick Mayhew MP 1992–97
Lord President of the Council
Leader of the House of Commons
The Rt Hon. Tony Newton MP 1992–97
Lord Privy Seal
Leader of the House of Lords
The Rt Hon. Viscount Cranborne 1994–97
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster The Rt Hon. Roger Freeman MP 1995–97
Secretary of State for Social Security The Rt Hon. Peter Lilley MP 1992–97
Secretary of State for Scotland The Rt Hon. Michael Forsyth MP 1995–97
Secretary of State for Trade and Industry
President of the Board of Trade
The Rt Hon. Ian Lang MP 1995–97
Secretary of State for Transport The Rt Hon. Sir George Young MP 1995–97
Chief Secretary to the Treasury The Rt Hon. William Waldegrave MP 1995–97
Secretary of State for Wales The Rt Hon. William Hague MP 1995–97
Minister without portfolio
Chairman of the Conservative Party
The Rt Hon. Brian Mawhinney MP 1995–97
Also attending cabinet meetings
Chief Whip
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury
The Rt Hon. Alastair Goodlad MP 1995–97

List of Ministers[edit]

Members of the Cabinet are in bold face.

Office Name Date Notes
Prime Minister
First Lord of the Treasury
Minister for the Civil Service
John Major Continued in office – 1 May 1997  
Lord Chancellor The Lord Mackay of Clashfern Continued in office  
Lord President of the Council Tony Newton 10 April 1992  
Lord Privy Seal The Lord Wakeham 11 April 1992  
Viscount Cranborne 20 July 1994  
Chancellor of the Exchequer Norman Lamont 28 November 1990  
Kenneth Clarke 27 May 1993  
Chief Secretary to the Treasury Michael Portillo 10 April 1992  
Jonathan Aitken 20 July 1994  
The Hon. William Waldegrave 5 July 1995  
Minister of State, Treasury Sir John Cope 14 April 1992 – 20 July 1994 also Paymaster-General
Anthony Nelson 20 July 1994 – 6 July 1995  
David Heathcoat-Amory 20 July 1994 – 20 July 1996 also Paymaster-General
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury Richard Ryder 28 November 1990  
Alastair Goodlad 5 July 1995  
Financial Secretary to the Treasury Stephen Dorrell 14 April 1992  
Sir George Young 20 July 1994  
Michael Jack 5 July 1995  
Lords of the Treasury Greg Knight Continued in office – 27 May 1993  
Irvine Patnick Continued in office – 20 July 1994  
Nicholas Baker 3 December 1990 – 20 July 1994  
Tim Wood 14 April 1992 – 5 July 1995  
Tim Boswell 14 April 1992 – 11 December 1992  
Timothy Kirkhope 11 December 1992 – 5 July 1995  
Andrew MacKay 27 May 1993 – 17 October 1995  
Derek Conway 20 July 1994 – 23 July 1996  
Andrew Mitchell 20 July 1994 – 5 July 1995  
Bowen Wells 5 July 1995 – 1 May 1997  
Simon Burns 5 July 1995 – 23 July 1996  
David Willetts 5 July 1995 – 28 November 1995  
Michael Bates 17 October 1995 – 11 December 1996  
Liam Fox 28 November 1995 – 23 July 1996  
Patrick McLoughlin 23 July 1996 – 1 May 1997  
Roger Knapman 23 July 1996 – 1 May 1997  
Richard Ottaway 23 July 1996 – 1 May 1997  
Gyles Brandreth 11 December 1996 – 1 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs Douglas Hurd 26 October 1989  
Malcolm Rifkind 5 July 1995  
Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs Lynda Chalker Continued in office – 1 May 1997 also Minister of Overseas Development; created Baroness Chalker of Wallasey 24 April 1992
Tristan Garel-Jones Continued in office – 27 May 1993  
The Hon. Douglas Hogg Continued in office – 5 July 1995  
Alastair Goodlad 15 April 1992 – 5 July 1995  
David Heathcoat-Amory 27 May 1993 – 20 July 1994  
David Davis 20 July 1994 – 1 May 1997  
Jeremy Hanley 5 July 1995 – 1 May 1997  
Sir Nicholas Bonsor 5 July 1995 – 1 May 1997  
Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs The Hon. Mark Lennox-Boyd Continued in office  
vacant 20 July 1994  
Liam Fox 23 July 1996  
Minister for Overseas Development Lynda Chalker, Baroness Chalker of Wallasey Continued in office also Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs; created Baroness Chalker of Wallasey 24 April 1992
Secretary of State for the Home Department Kenneth Clarke 11 April 1992  
Michael Howard 27 May 1993  
Minister of State for Home Affairs The Earl Ferrers Continued in office – 20 July 1994  
Michael Jack 14 April 1992 – 27 May 1993  
Peter Lloyd 14 April 1992 – 20 July 1994  
David Maclean 27 May 1993 – 1 May 1997  
Michael Forsyth 20 July 1994 – 5 July 1995  
The Baroness Blatch 20 July 1994 – 1 May 1997  
Ann Widdecombe 5 July 1995 – 1 May 1997  
Under-Secretary of State for Home Affairs Charles Wardle 15 April 1992 – 20 July 1994  
Nicholas Baker 20 July 1994 – 17 October 1995  
Timothy Kirkhope 17 October 1995 – 1 May 1997  
The Hon. Tom Sackville 28 November 1995 – 1 May 1997  
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food John Gummer Continued in office  
Gillian Shephard 24 May 1993  
The Hon. William Waldegrave 20 July 1994  
The Hon. Douglas Hogg 5 July 1995  
Minister of State for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food David Curry 14 April 1992 – 27 May 1993  
Michael Jack 27 May 1993 – 5 July 1995  
Tony Baldry 5 July 1995 – 1 May 1997  
Under-Secretary of State for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food The Hon. Nicholas Soames 14 April 1992 – 20 July 1994  
The Earl Howe 14 April 1992 – 5 July 1995  
Angela Browning 20 July 1994 – 1 May 1997  
Tim Boswell 5 July 1995 – 1 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Defence Malcolm Rifkind 15 April 1992  
Michael Portillo 5 July 1995  
Minister of State for the Armed Forces The Hon. Archie Hamilton Continued in office  
Jeremy Hanley 27 May 1993  
The Hon. Nicholas Soames 20 July 1994  
Minister of State for Defence Procurement Jonathan Aitken 14 April 1992  
Roger Freeman 20 July 1994  
James Arbuthnot 6 July 1995  
Under-Secretary of State for Defence Viscount Cranborne 22 April 1992 – 20 July 1994  
The Lord Henley 20 July 1994 – 6 July 1995  
The Earl Howe 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Education John Patten 10 April 1992  
Gillian Shephard 20 July 1994 Secretary of State for Education and Employment after 5 July 1995
Minister of State, Education The Baroness Blatch 14 April 1992 – 20 July 1994  
Eric Forth 20 July 1994 – 2 May 1997 Minister of State, Education and Employment after 5 July 1995
Minister of State, Education and Employment The Lord Henley 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Under-Secretary of State, Education Eric Forth 14 April 1992 – 20 July 1994  
Nigel Forman 14 April 1992 – 11 December 1992  
Tim Boswell 19 December 1992 – 6 July 1995  
Robin Squire 27 May 1993 – 2 May 1997 Under-Secretary of State, Education and Employment after 5 July 1995
Under-Secretary of State, Education and Employment James Paice 7 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Cheryl Gillan 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Employment Gillian Shephard 12 April 1992  
David Hunt 27 May 1993  
Michael Portillo 20 July 1994 Merged with the Office of Education 5 July 1995
Minister of State, Employment Michael Forsyth 14 April 1992 – 20 July 1994  
Ann Widdecombe 20 July 1995 – 5 July 1995  
Under-Secretary of State, Employment The Viscount Ullswater Continued in office – 16 September 1993  
Patrick McLoughlin 14 April 1992 – 27 May 1993  
Ann Widdecombe 27 May 1993 – 20 July 1994  
The Lord Henley 16 September 1993 – 20 July 1994  
James Paice 20 July 1994 – 5 July 1995  
Phillip Oppenheim 20 July 1994 – 5 July 1995  
Minister of State, Energy Timothy Eggar 15 April 1992 – 20 July 1994 under Office of Trade and Industry; became Minister of State, Energy and Industry 20 July 1994
Secretary of State for the Environment Michael Howard 11 April 1992  
John Gummer 27 May 1993  
Minister of State for Local Government John Redwood 15 April 1992  
David Curry 27 May 1993  
Minister of State for Housing Sir George Young 28 November 1990  
The Viscount Ullswater 20 July 1994 Post renamed Minister of State for Construction 6 July 1995
Minister of State for Construction Robert Jones 6 July 1995  
Minister of State for Environment and Countryside David Maclean 14 April 1992  
Tim Yeo 27 May 1993  
Robert Atkins 7 January 1994  
The Earl Ferrers 6 July 1995  
Under-Secretary of State, Environment Tony Baldry 28 November 1990 – 20 July 1994  
The Lord Strathclyde 15 April 1992 – 16 September 1993  
Robin Squire 15 April 1992 – 27 May 1993  
The Baroness Denton 16 September 1993 – 11 January 1994  
The Earl of Arran 11 January 1994 – 20 July 1994  
Sir Paul Beresford 20 July 1994 – 2 May 1997  
Robert Jones 20 July 1994 – 6 July 1995  
James Clappison 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Health Virginia Bottomley 10 April 1992  
Stephen Dorrell 5 July 1995  
Minister of State, Health Brian Mawhinney 14 April 1992  
Gerry Malone 20 July 1994  
Under-Secretary of State, Health and Social Security The Hon. Tom Sackville 14 April 1992 – 29 November 1995  
The Baroness Cumberlege 14 April 1992 – 2 May 1997  
Tim Yeo 15 April 1992 – 27 May 1993  
John Bowis 27 May 1993 – 23 July 1996  
John Horam 29 November 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Simon Burns 23 July 1996 – 2 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Social Security Peter Lilley 10 April 1992  
Minister of State, Social Security Nicholas Scott Continued in office – 20 July 1994  
William Hague 20 July 1994 – 5 July 1995  
The Lord MacKay of Ardbrecknish 20 July 1994 – 2 May 1997  
Alistair Burt 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Under-Secretary of State, Social Security Ann Widdecombe 30 November 1990 – 27 May 1993  
Alistair Burt 14 April 1992 – 6 July 1995  
William Hague 27 May 1993 – 20 July 1994  
The Viscount Astor 16 September 1993 – 20 July 1994  
James Arbuthnot 20 July 1994 – 6 July 1995  
Roger Evans 20 July 1994 – 2 May 1997  
Andrew Mitchell 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Oliver Heald 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster The Hon. William Waldegrave 11 April 1992 also Minister for the Public Service
David Hunt 20 July 1994 also Minister for the Public Service
Roger Freeman 5 July 1995 also Minister for the Public Service
Parliamentary Secretary for the Public Service Robert V. Jackson 15 April 1992  
David Davis 27 May 1993  
Robert Hughes 20 July 1994  
John Horam 6 March 1995  
David Willetts 28 November 1995  
vacant 20 July 1996  
Michael Bates 16 December 1996  
Secretary of State for National Heritage David Mellor 11 April 1992  
Peter Brooke 25 September 1992  
Stephen Dorrell 20 July 1994  
Virginia Bottomley 5 July 1995  
Minister of State, National Heritage Iain Sproat 6 July 1995  
Under-Secretary of State, National Heritage Robert Key 14 April 1992 – 27 May 1993  
Iain Sproat 27 May 1993 – 6 July 1995  
The Viscount Astor 20 July 1994 – 6 July 1995  
The Lord Inglewood 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Sir Patrick Mayhew 10 April 1992  
Minister of State, Northern Ireland Robert Atkins 14 April 1992 – 11 January 1994  
Michael Mates 15 April 1992 – 24 June 1993  
Sir John Wheeler 25 June 1993 – 2 May 1997  
Michael Ancram 11 January 1994 – 2 May 1997  
Under-Secretary of State, Northern Ireland Jeremy Hanley 3 December 1990 – 27 May 1993  
The Earl of Arran 22 April 1992 – 11 January 1994  
Michael Ancram 27 May 1993 – 5 January 1994  
The Baroness Denton 20 July 1994 – 2 May 1997  
Tim Smith 6 January 1994 – 20 October 1994  
Malcolm Moss 25 October 1994 – 2 May 1997  
Paymaster-General Sir John Cope 14 April 1992 also Minister of State, Treasury
David Heathcoat-Amory 20 July 1994 also Minister of State, Treasury
David Willetts 20 July 1996  
Michael Bates 16 December 1996  
Minister without Portfolio Jeremy Hanley 20 July 1994 – 5 July 1995  
Brian Mawhinney 5 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Scotland Ian Lang 28 November 1990  
Michael Forsyth 5 July 1995  
Minister of State for Scotland The Lord Fraser of Carmyllie 14 April 1992 – 6 July 1995  
The Lord James Douglas-Hamilton 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Under-Secretary of State for Scotland The Lord James Douglas-Hamilton Continued in office – 6 July 1995  
Allan Stewart 28 November 1990 – 8 February 1995  
Sir Hector Monro 14 April 1992 – 6 July 1995  
George Kynoch 8 February 1995 – 2 May 1997  
The Earl of Lindsay 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Raymond Robertson 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Minister for Consumer Affairs The Earl Ferrers 20 July 1994 Under Office of Trade and Industry; office abolished 6 July 1995
Minister for Trade Richard Needham
(The Earl of Kilmorey)
14 April 1992  
Anthony Nelson 6 July 1995  
Secretary of State for Trade and Industry Michael Heseltine 10 April 1992  
Ian Lang 5 July 1995  
Minister for Industry Tim Sainsbury 15 April 1992  
vacant 20 July 1994  
Minister of State for Trade and Industry The Lord Strathclyde 11 January 1994 – 20 July 1994  
The Lord Fraser of Carmyllie 6 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Minister of State, Energy and Industry Timothy Eggar 20 July 1994  
Greg Knight 23 July 1996  
Under-Secretary of State for Trade and Industry Edward Leigh Continued in office – 27 May 1993  
Neil Hamilton 14 April 1992 – 25 October 1994  
The Baroness Denton 14 April 1992 – 16 September 1993  
Jonathan Evans 27 October 1994 – 29 November 1995  
Patrick McLoughlin 27 May 1993 – 20 July 1994  
The Lord Strathclyde 16 September 1993 – 11 January 1994  
Charles Wardle 20 July 1994 – 11 February 1995  
Ian Taylor 20 July 1994 – 2 May 1997  
Richard Page 14 February 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Phillip Oppenheim 7 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  
John Mark Taylor 29 November 1995 – 2 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Transport John MacGregor 10 April 1992  
Brian Mawhinney 20 July 1994  
Sir George Young 5 July 1995  
Minister for Public Transport Roger Freeman 28 November 1990 – 20 July 1994  
Minister for Railways and Roads The Earl of Caithness 14 April 1992 – 11 January 1994  
John Watts 20 July 1994 – 2 May 1997  
Under-Secretary of State for Transport Kenneth Carlisle 14 April 1992 – 27 May 1993  
Steven Norris 14 April 1992 – 23 July 1996  
Robert Key 27 May 1993 – 20 July 1994  
The Lord MacKay of Ardbrecknish 11 January 1994 – 20 July 1994  
The Viscount Goschen 20 July 1994 – 2 May 1997  
John Bowis 23 July 1996 – 2 May 1997  
Secretary of State for Wales David Hunt Continued in office  
John Redwood 27 May 1993  
William Hague 5 July 1995  
Minister of State for Wales Wyn Roberts Continued in office – 20 July 1994  
Under-Secretary of State for Wales Nicholas Bennett 3 December 1990 – 14 April 1994  
Gwilym Jones 14 April 1992 – 2 May 1997  
Rod Richards 20 July 1994 – 2 June 1996  
Jonathan Evans 2 June 1996 – 2 May 1997  
Attorney General Sir Patrick Mayhew Continued in office  
Sir Nicholas Lyell 9 April 1992  
Solicitor General Sir Derek Spencer 15 April 1992  
Lord Advocate The Lord Rodger of Earlsferry 15 April 1992  
The Lord Mackay of Drumadoon 7 November 1995  
Solicitor General for Scotland Thomas Dawson 15 April 1992 Not an MP
Donald Mackay 4 May 1995 Not an MP
Paul Cullen 7 November 1995 Not an MP
Treasurer of the Household David Heathcoat-Amory 15 April 1992  
Greg Knight 7 June 1993  
Andrew MacKay 23 July 1996  
Comptroller of the Household David Lightbown 28 November 1990  
Timothy Wood 7 July 1995  
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household Sydney Chapman 15 April 1992  
Timothy Kirkhope 7 July 1995  
Andrew MacKay 18 October 1995  
Derek Conway 23 July 1996  
Captain of the Gentlemen-at-Arms The Lord Hesketh 2 May 1991  
The Viscount Ullswater 16 September 1993  
The Lord Strathclyde 20 July 1994  
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard The Earl of Strathmore 30 December 1991  
The Earl of Arran 20 July 1994  
The Lord Inglewood January 1995  
The Lord Chesham 8 July 1995  
Lords-in-Waiting The Lord Cavendish of Furness Continued in office – 22 April 1993  
The Viscount Astor Continued in office – 16 September 1993  
The Viscount St Davids 22 April 1992 – 20 July 1994  
The Viscount Goschen 22 April 1992 – 20 July 1994  
The Baroness Trumpington 22 April 1992 – 2 May 1997  
The Lord MacKay of Ardbrecknish 15 October 1993 – 11 January 1994  
The Lord Annaly 18 March 1994 – 20 July 1994  
The Lord Lucas of Crudwell 21 July 1994 – 2 May 1997  
The Baroness Miller of Hendon 21 July 1994 – 2 May 1997  
The Lord Inglewood 21 July 1994 – January 1995  
The Earl of Lindsay 12 January 1995 – 6 July 1995  
The Earl of Courtown 8 July 1995 – 2 May 1997  

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brown, Colin; Abrams, Fran (13 December 1996). "The Major minority". The Independent. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  2. ^ "John Major: A life in politics". BBC News. 28 September 2002.
  3. ^ a b c d "Holders of Ministerial Office in the Conservative Governments 1979-1997" (PDF). House of Commons Library. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  4. ^ "1992: Mellor resigns over sex scandal". BBC. Retrieved 27 June 2017.

Further reading[edit]

  • D. Butler and G. Butler (ed.), Twentieth Century British Political Facts 1900–2000

External links[edit]

Preceded by
First Major ministry
Government of the United Kingdom
1992–1997
Succeeded by
First Blair ministry