SEC v. Chenery Corp. (1943)

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Securities and Exchange Commission v. Chenery Corporation
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued December 17–18, 1942
Decided February 1, 1943
Full case name Securities and Exchange Commission v. Chenery Corporation
Citations 318 U.S. 80 (more)
63 S. Ct. 454; 87 L. Ed. 626; 1943 U.S. LEXIS 1301
Prior history Cert. to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Frankfurter, joined by Stone, Roberts, Jackson, Rutledge
Dissent Black, joined by Reed, Murphy
Douglas took no part in the consideration or decision of the case.

Securities and Exchange Commission v. Chenery Corporation, 318 U.S. 80 (1943), is a United States Supreme Court case. It is often referred to as Chenery I, as four years later the case was before the Supreme Court a second time in Chenery II. Chenery I set out what is known as the Chenery Doctrine, a basic principle of U.S. administrative law that an agency may not defend an administrative decision on new grounds not set forth by the agency in its original decision.

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External links[edit]

  • Text of Securities and Exchange Commission v. Chenery Corporation, 318 U.S. 80 (1943) is available from:  Findlaw  Justia