Shish kebab

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Şiş kebap with "şehriyeli pilav" (orzo pilaf), onions with sumac, a grilled pepper, a slice of tomato (also grilled) and rucula leaves.

Shish kebab (Azerbaijani: Basdırma kabab; Turkish: şiş kebap) or Seekh kebab (Urdu: سیخ کباب‎) is a dish of skewered and grilled cubes of meat.[1] The word kebab denotes a wide variety of different grilled meat dishes. Shish is the Turkish word for sword or skewer,[2] and kebab (כבבא) is originally an ancient Aramaic word meaning roast meat. It is popular in the whole of Asia. It's similar to a dish called shashlik, which is found in the Caucasus region.[3]

It is generally made of lamb (kuzu şiş)[4] but there are also versions with beef or veal (dana şiş), swordfish (kılıç şiş)[5] and chicken meat (tavuk şiş or şiş tavuk). In Turkey, şiş kebap and the vegetables served with it are grilled separately, normally not on the same skewer.[6]

Seekh kebab[edit]

Seekh kebab

A Pakistani variation prepared with minced meat with spices and grilled on skewers. It is cooked in a Tandoor, and is often served with chutneys or mint sauce. It is often included in tandoori sampler platters, which contain a variety of tandoor cooked dishes. A seekh kebab can also be served in a naan bread much like döner kebab. Seekh kebabs are part of the traditional Pakistani diet.

Variations of shish kebab[edit]

Şiş tavuk
Kuzu şiş (Lamb shish kebab)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Ayto (18 October 2012). The Diner's Dictionary: Word Origins of Food and Drink. OUP Oxford. pp. 192–. ISBN 978-0-19-964024-9. 
  2. ^ Gil Marks (17 November 2010). Encyclopedia of Jewish Food. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. pp. 597–. ISBN 0-544-18631-1. 
  3. ^ Davidson, Allen, "The Oxford Companion to Food", p.442.
  4. ^ Ozcan Ozan (13 December 2013). The Sultan's Kitchen: A Turkish Cookbook. Tuttle Publishing. pp. 146–. ISBN 978-1-4629-0639-0. 
  5. ^ Mimi Sheraton (13 January 2015). 1,000 Foods To Eat Before You Die: A Food Lover's Life List. Workman Publishing Company. pp. 1090–. ISBN 978-0-7611-8306-8. 
  6. ^ Steven Raichlen (28 May 2008). The Barbecue! Bible 10th Anniversary Edition. Workman Publishing Company. pp. 214–. ISBN 978-0-7611-5957-5. 

External links[edit]