Segunda División

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LaLiga Hypermotion
Organising bodyLiga Nacional de Fútbol Profesional
Founded1929; 95 years ago (1929)
Country Spain (21 teams)
Other club(s) from Andorra (1 team)
ConfederationUEFA
Number of teams22
Level on pyramid2
Promotion toPrimera División
Relegation toTercera División (1929–1977)
Segunda División B (1977–2021)
Primera Federación (2021–present)
Domestic cup(s)Copa del Rey
International cup(s)UEFA Europa League
(via winning Copa del Rey)
Current champions Granada (4th title)
(2022–23)
Most championshipsMurcia (8 titles)
TV partnersLaLiga TV Hypermotion
#Vamos por Movistar Plus+
Websitelaliga.com
Current: 2023–24 Segunda División

The Campeonato Nacional de Liga de Segunda División,[a] commonly known as Segunda División, and officially known as LaLiga Hypermotion for sponsorship reasons, is the men's second professional association football division of the Spanish football league system. Administered by Liga Nacional de Fútbol Profesional, it is contested by 22 teams, with the top two teams plus the winner of a play-off promoted to La Liga and replaced by the three lowest-placed teams in that division.

History[edit]

The Second Division National Championship was inaugurated concurrently with the First Division, during the 1928-29 season. This setup comprised twenty teams divided into two groups: A and B. Group A functioned as the secondary national level, where the leading team would contest for promotion to the First Division and the bottom two faced relegation to the Third Division. Conversely, Group B represented the third tier, wherein two teams were promoted to the Second Division, while the remaining eight joined the newly formed Third Division in the subsequent season.

For this inaugural season, Group A consisted of the following clubs: Sevilla F. C., Iberia S. C., Deportivo Alavés, Real Sporting de Gijón, Valencia F. C., Real Betis Balompié, Real Oviedo F. C., Real Club Celta, R. C. Deportivo de La Coruña, and Racing Club de Madrid. On the other hand, Group B featured Cultural y Deportiva Leonesa, Real Murcia F. C., C. D. Castellón, C. D. Torrelavega, Zaragoza C. D., Real Valladolid Deportivo, C. A. Osasuna, Tolosa C. F., Barakaldo C. F., and Cartagena F. C..

The structure and number of teams in the competition have evolved over time. In the 1934-35 season, the league was segmented into multiple groups. This format persisted until the 1968-69 season when it transitioned back to the singular group system that is in place today. From 1977 to 1984, when its management transitioned to the National Professional Football League, the tournament was referred to as Second Division A, after the introduction of the Second Division B as the third level in the national football hierarchy.

During the 2019-20 season, a global outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 emerged,[1] having originated in Asia and subsequently spreading to Europe.[2][3] As the virus rapidly spread across the continent, leading to rising infections and fatalities, sports entities began implementing preventative measures. In Spain, to mitigate the spread, only one match was held behind closed doors, without spectators,[4] yet the concern and rate of infections did not diminish, with several players and club executives testing positive. In light of the escalating situation, La Liga opted to halt all competitions temporarily,[5] following a precedent set by UEFA, which had suspended both the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa League.[6][7] In a similar vein, Italy's CONI and FIGC put the Serie A on hold due to the same health concerns.[8] After a period of lockdown which saw a decrease in the spread of the virus, the government allowed sporting competitions to recommence,[9] culminating on July 20 as the remaining games were played, mirroring events in the First Division. Nonetheless, on the final matchday, multiple players from Club de Fútbol Fuenlabrada, S.A.D. were diagnosed with the virus. Consequently, their pivotal game against Real Club Deportivo de La Coruña, which was of great importance to the league standings, was delayed. This disruption impacted several clubs and the ensuing promotion playoffs.[10]

Naming Conventions[edit]

The 2006-07 and 2007-08 seasons marked the first instances when the championship adopted a commercial designation, being named "Liga BBVA" following a sponsorship agreement between the National Professional Football League and the bank of the same title.[11] From the 2008-09 through to the 2015-16 seasons, the division was rebranded as "Liga Adelante" as the bank transitioned to sponsor the First Division.[12] In the 2016-17 season, Banco Santander emerged as the primary sponsor, prompting the names "LaLiga 1|2|3" (wih an enlarged "2" thus taking on the "LaLiga 2" moniker unsponsored). From the 2019-20 season onward, it became "LaLiga SmartBank". During the 2023-24 season, the new sponsor was introduced as EA Sports, resulting in the title "LaLiga Hypermotion".[13][14]

Records[edit]

Real Murcia has participated in the Second Division for the most seasons, a total of 53, and has secured the championship title on eight occasions. They are followed by Sporting de Gijón with 48 seasons, Tenerife and Sabadell with 44, Hércules de Alicante with 43, and Real Club Deportivo de La Coruña, Castellón, and Cádiz each with 41 seasons.

Sociedad Deportiva Eibar holds the record for consecutive seasons in the division, with 18 seasons running from 1987/88 to 2005/06.

Among all teams that have ever competed in this division, only six have never featured in lower divisions: Atlético de Madrid, Espanyol, Valencia, Sevilla, Real Sociedad, and Sporting de Gijón.

In the 2011-12 season, Deportivo de La Coruña set a new record by amassing 91 points, leading them to clinch the championship.[15][16] The subsequent season, 2012-13, witnessed Elche as the first team to maintain the top position throughout all 42 matchdays.[17][18]

League format[edit]

The league contains 22 teams that play each other home and away for a 42-match season. Each year three teams are promoted to La Liga. The top two teams earn an automatic promotion. The third team to be promoted is the winner of a play-off between the teams that finished 3rd to 6th (reserve teams are not eligible for promotion). The play-offs comprise two-legged semi-finals followed by a two-legged final. The bottom four are relegated to Primera Federación.[19]

Clubs[edit]

22 teams contest the league in its current season, including the top 15 sides from the 2022–23 season, three relegated from 2022–23 La Liga and four promoted from the 2022–23 Primera Federación. Elche, Espanyol and Real Valladolid were relegated from La Liga, Amorebieta, Racing Ferrol were promoted directly, Alcorcón and Eldense won the promotion play-off.

Team changes[edit]

Promoted from 2022–23 Primera Federación Relegated from 2022–23 La Liga Promoted to 2023–24 La Liga Relegated to 2023–24 Primera Federación
Alcorcón
Amorebieta
Eldense
Racing Ferrol
Elche
Espanyol
Real Valladolid
Alaves
Granada
Las Palmas
Ibiza
Lugo
Malaga
Ponferradina

Stadiums and locations[edit]

Location of teams in 2023–24 Segunda División (Canary Islands)
Team Location Stadium Capacity
Albacete Albacete Carlos Belmonte 17,524[20]
Alcorcón Alcorcón Santo Domingo 5,100[21]
Amorebieta Amorebieta-Etxano Urritxe 3,000[22]
Andorra Andorra Andorra la Vella Estadi Nacional 3,306
Burgos Burgos El Plantío 12,194[23]
Cartagena Cartagena Cartagonova 15,105[24]
Eibar Eibar Ipurua 8,164[25]
Elche Elche Martínez Valero 33,732[26]
Eldense Elda Nuevo Pepico Amat 4,036
Espanyol Cornellà de Llobregat RCDE Stadium 40,000[27]
Huesca Huesca El Alcoraz 9,100[28]
Leganés Leganés Butarque 12,450[29]
Levante Valencia Ciutat de València 26,354[30]
Mirandés Miranda de Ebro Anduva 5,759[31]
Oviedo Oviedo Carlos Tartiere 30,500[32]
Racing Ferrol Ferrol A Malata 12,043[33]
Racing Santander Santander El Sardinero 22,222[34]
Sporting Gijón Gijón El Molinón 30,000[35]
Tenerife Santa Cruz de Tenerife Heliodoro Rodríguez López 22,824[36]
Valladolid Valladolid José Zorrilla 27,618[37]
Villarreal B Villarreal Estadio de la Ceramica 23,000
Zaragoza Zaragoza La Romareda 33,608[38]

All-time standings[edit]

Segunda División seasons[edit]

Season Champions Runners-up Other Teams Promoted
1929 Sevilla[i] Iberia SC[i]
1929–30 Alavés Sporting Gijón[i]
1930–31 Valencia Sevilla[i]
1931–32 Real Betis Oviedo[i]
1932–33 Oviedo Atlético Madrid[i]
1933–34 Sevilla Atlético Madrid
1934–35 Hércules Osasuna
1935–36 Celta Vigo Zaragoza
1939–40 Murcia Deportivo La Coruña (not promoted)
1940–41 Granada Real Sociedad Castellón and Deportivo La Coruña
1941–42 Real Betis Zaragoza
1942–43 Sabadell Real Sociedad
1943–44 Sporting Gijón Murcia
1944–45 Alcoyano Hércules Celta Vigo
1945–46 Sabadell Deportivo La Coruña
1946–47 Alcoyano Gimnàstic Real Sociedad
1947–48 Valladolid Deportivo La Coruña
1948–49 Real Sociedad Málaga
Season Northern Group Winner Southern Group Winner Other teams promoted
1949–50 Racing Santander Alcoyano Lleida and Murcia
1950–51 Sporting Gijón Atlético Tetuán Zaragoza and Las Palmas
1951–52 Oviedo Málaga
1952–53 Osasuna Jaén
1953–54 Alavés Las Palmas Hércules and Málaga
1954–55 Cultural Leonesa Murcia
1955–56 Osasuna Jaén Zaragoza and Condal
1956–57 Sporting Gijón Granada
1957–58 Oviedo Real Betis
1958–59 Elche Valladolid
1959–60 Racing Santander Mallorca
1960–61 Osasuna Tenerife
1961–62 Deportivo La Coruña Córdoba Valladolid and Málaga
1962–63 Pontevedra Murcia Levante and Espanyol
1963–64 Deportivo La Coruña Las Palmas
1964–65 Pontevedra Mallorca Sabadell and Málaga
1965–66 Deportivo La Coruña Hércules Granada
1966–67 Real Sociedad Málaga Real Betis
1967–68 Deportivo La Coruña Granada
Season Champions Runner Up Other teams promoted
1968–69 Sevilla Celta Vigo Mallorca
1969–70 Sporting Gijón Málaga Espanyol
1970–71 Real Betis Burgos (I) Deportivo La Coruña and Córdoba
1971–72 Oviedo Castellón Zaragoza
1972–73 Murcia Elche Racing Santander
1973–74 Real Betis Hércules Salamanca
1974–75 Oviedo Racing Santander Sevilla
1975–76 Burgos (I) Celta Vigo Málaga
1976–77 Sporting Gijón Cádiz Rayo Vallecano
1977–78 Zaragoza Recreativo Celta Vigo
1978–79 AD Almería Málaga Real Betis
1979–80 Murcia Valladolid Osasuna
1980–81 Castellón Cádiz Racing Santander
1981–82 Celta Vigo Salamanca Málaga
1982–83 Murcia Cádiz Mallorca
1983–84 Castilla[ii] Bilbao Athletic[ii] Hércules, Racing Santander and Elche
1984–85 Las Palmas Cádiz Celta Vigo
1985–86 Murcia Sabadell Mallorca
1986–87 Valencia Logroñés Celta Vigo
1987–88 Málaga Elche Oviedo
1988–89 Castellón Rayo Vallecano Mallorca and Tenerife
1989–90 Real Burgos Real Betis Espanyol
1990–91 Albacete Deportivo La Coruña
1991–92 Celta Vigo Rayo Vallecano
1992–93 Lleida Valladolid Racing Santander
1993–94 Espanyol Real Betis Compostela
1994–95 Mérida Rayo Vallecano Salamanca
1995–96 Hércules Logroñés Extremadura
1996–97 Mérida Salamanca Mallorca
1997–98 Alavés Extremadura Villarreal
1998–99 Málaga Atlético Madrid B[ii] Numancia, Sevilla and Rayo Vallecano
1999–2000 Las Palmas Osasuna Villarreal
2000–01 Sevilla Real Betis Tenerife
2001–02 Atlético Madrid Racing Santander Recreativo
2002–03 Murcia Zaragoza Albacete
2003–04 Levante Numancia Getafe
2004–05 Cádiz Celta Vigo Alavés
2005–06 Recreativo Gimnàstic Levante
2006–07 Valladolid Almería Murcia
2007–08 Numancia Málaga Sporting Gijón
2008–09 Xerez Zaragoza Tenerife
2009–10 Real Sociedad Hércules Levante
2010–11 Real Betis Rayo Vallecano Granada
2011–12 Deportivo La Coruña Celta Vigo Valladolid
2012–13 Elche Villarreal Almeria
2013–14 Eibar Deportivo La Coruña Córdoba
2014–15 Real Betis Sporting Gijón Las Palmas
2015–16 Alavés Leganés Osasuna
2016–17 Levante Girona Getafe
2017–18 Rayo Vallecano Huesca Valladolid
2018–19 Osasuna Granada Mallorca
2019–20 Huesca Cádiz Elche
2020–21 Espanyol Mallorca Rayo Vallecano
2021–22 Almería Valladolid Girona
2022–23 Granada Las Palmas Alavés

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Not promoted
  2. ^ a b c Not promoted due to being a reserve team from a La Liga side

Champions and promotions[edit]

Club Winners Promotions Winning Years
Murcia
8
11
1939–40, 1954–55, 1962–63, 1972–73, 1979–80, 1982–83, 1985–86, 2002–03
Real Betis
7
12
1931–32, 1941–42, 1957–58, 1970–71, 1973–74, 2010–11, 2014–15
Deportivo La Coruña
5
11
1961–62, 1963–64, 1965–66, 1967–68, 2011–12
Sporting Gijón
5
7
1943–44, 1950–51, 1956–57, 1969–70, 1976–77
Oviedo
5
6
1932–33, 1951–52, 1957–58, 1971–72, 1974–75
Málaga*
4
13
1951–52, 1966–67, 1987–88, 1998–99
Alavés
4
7
1929–30, 1953–54, 1997–98, 2015–16
Osasuna
4
7
1952–53, 1955–56, 1960–61, 2018–19
Las Palmas
4
6
1953–54, 1963–64, 1984–85, 1999–2000
Granada
4
6
1940–41, 1956–57, 1967–68, 2022–23
Sevilla
4
5
1929, 1933–34, 1968–69, 2000–01
Celta Vigo
3
11
1935–36, 1981–82, 1991–92
Hércules
3
8
1934–35, 1965–66, 1995–96
Valladolid
3
9
1947–48, 1958–59, 2006–07
Real Sociedad
3
6
1948–49, 1966–67, 2009–10
Alcoyano
3
3
1944–45, 1946–47, 1949–50
Racing Santander
2
8
1949–50, 1959–60
Mallorca
2
7
1959–60, 1964–65
Elche
2
6
1958–59, 2012–13
Levante
2
5
2003–04, 2016–17
Castellón
2
4
1980–81, 1988–89
Sabadell
2
4
1942–43, 1945–46
Espanyol
2
4
1993–94, 2020–21
Mérida
2
2
1994–95, 1996–97
Valencia
2
2
1930–31, 1986–87
Pontevedra
2
2
1962–63, 1964–65
Jaén
2
2
1952–53, 1955–56
Zaragoza
1
8
1977–78
Rayo Vallecano
1
7
2017–18
Cádiz
1
6
2004–05
Tenerife
1
4
1960–61
Almería
1
3
2021–22
Numancia
1
3
2007–08
Recreativo
1
3
2005–06
Córdoba
1
3
1961–62
Huesca
1
2
2019–20
Atlético Madrid
1
2
2001–02
Lleida
1
2
1992–93
Albacete
1
2
1990–91
Burgos CF (I)
1
2
1975–76
Eibar
1
1
2013–14
Xerez
1
1
2008–09
Real Burgos
1
1
1989–90
AD Almería
1
1
1978–79
Cultural Leonesa
1
1
1954–55
Atlético Tetuán
1
1
1950–51
Castilla
1
n/a
1983–84

Italics: shared titles
*Championships won by Málaga CF and CD Málaga

Media coverage[edit]

Spain[edit]

Broadcaster Summary Ref
LaLiga TV Hypermotion 11 (all) matches per week, live. [39]
#Vamos por Movistar Plus+ 2 matches per week, live. [39]

List of all-time top scorers by season[edit]

Season Player Goals Club
1929 Unknown
1929-30 Unknown
1930-31 Adolfo Suárez (Unknown) 18 Unknown
1931-32 Isidro Lángara  Spain 24 Oviedo
1932-33 Ramón Herrera (Unknown) 33 Unknown
1933-34 Campanal I  Spain 28 Sevilla F.C.
1934-35 Unknown
1935-36 Nolete  Spain 19 Celta Vigo
1936-1939: Cancelled due to Spanish Civil War
1939-40 Fernando Teràn  Spain 24 Unknown
1940-41 Julio Elicegui  Spain (2) 26 Real Unión
1941-42 José Mijares  Spain 18 Sporting Gijón
1942-43 Jose Saras  Spain 14 Racing Santander
1943-44 José Araujo  Spain 21 Xerez
1944-45 José Araujo  Spain (2) 22 Xerez
1945-46 Jose Saras  Spain (2), Mariano Uceda  Spain 20 Racing Santander, Zaragoza
1946-47 Francisco Peralta  Spain 24 Nàstic
1947-48 José Serratusell  Spain 31 Badalona
1948-49 Pedro Bazàn  Spain 25 C.D. Málaga
1949-50 Pío Alonso  Spain 31 Sporting Gijón
1950-51 Paco Campos  Spain 29 Sporting Gijón
1951-52 Pedro Bazàn  Spain (2) 25 C.D. Málaga
1952-53 Ángel Arregui (Unknown) 30 Unknown
1953-54 Chas (Unknown) 23 Unknown
1954-55 Julito  Spain 25 C.D. Tenerife
1955-56 Rafa Delgado  Spain 25 Granada C.F.
1956-57 Ricardo Alós  Spain 45 Sporting Gijón
1957-58 Lalo  Spain, Chelo  Spain, Jordi Vila (Unknown) 19 Real Oviedo, Terrassa FC, Unknown
1958-59 José Cardona  Honduras 23 Elche CF
1959-60 José Paredes (Unknown) 25 Unknown
1960-61 José Luis Veloso  Spain 26 Deportivo La Coruña
1961-62 Amancio Amaro  Spain 25 Deportivo La Coruña
1962-63 José Miguel Olano  Spain 31 Real Sociedad
1963-64 Abel Fernàndez  Spain 26 Racing Santander
1964-65 José María Lizarralde  Spain 20 Indautxu
1965-66 Abel Fernàndez  Spain (2) 26 Celta Vigo
1966-67 Francisco Solabarietta  Spain 24 Sporting Gijón
1967-68 Abel Fernàndez  Spain (3), Cesàreo Rivera  Spain 17 Celta Vigo
1968-69 Quino  Spain 32 Real Betis
1969-70 Quini  Spain 21 Sporting Gijón
1970-71 Santillana  Spain 16 Racing Santander
1971-72 Enrique Galán  Spain 23 Real Oviedo
1972-73 Illán  Spain 20 Rayo Vallecano
1973-74 Baena  Spain 23 Cádiz
1974-75 José Juan Cioffi  Argentina 22 Castellón
1975-76 Illán  Spain (2), Antonio Burguete  Spain 22 C.D. Tenerife, Córdoba
1976-77 Quini  Spain (2) 27 Sporting Gijón
1977-78 Alfonso Castro  Spain 24 Deportivo La Coruña
1978-79 Patxi Iriguíbel  Spain 24 Osasuna
1979-80 Patxi Iriguíbel  Spain (2) 19 Osasuna
1980-81 Enrique Magdaleno  Spain 17 Burgos
1981-82 Pichi Lucas  Spain 26 Celta Vigo
1982-83 José Luis  Spain 16 Deportivo La Coruña
1983-84 Julio Salinas  Spain Unknown Bilbao Athletic
1984-85 Meíjas  Spain Unknown Cádiz
1985-86 Alcañiz  Spain Unknown Castellón
1986-87 Baltazar  Brazil 34 Celta Vigo
1987-88 Cárlos Muñoz  Spain 25 Real Oviedo
1988-89 Quique Estebaranz  Spain 23 Racing Santander
1989-90 Pepe Mel  Spain 22 Real Betis
1990-91 Juan Ramon Comas  Argentina 23 Murcia
1991-92 Vladimir Gudelj  Yugoslavia 26 Celta Vigo

Sponsorship names for seasons[edit]

  • Liga BBVA (2006–2008)
  • Liga Adelante (2008–2016)
  • LaLiga 1|2|3 (2016–2019)
  • LaLiga SmartBank (2019–2023)
  • LaLiga Hypermotion (2023–Present)[40]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Spanish: [kampeoˈnato naθjoˈnal de ˈliɣa ðe seˈɣunda ðiβiˈsjon]; "Second Division National League Championship"

References[edit]

  1. ^ "WHO declares the coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic". El País. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  2. ^ "China quarantines the city of Wuhan, the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak". El Español. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  3. ^ "The map illustrating the global extent of the coronavirus epidemic". BBC. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  4. ^ "Eibar vs. Real Sociedad match played without spectators due to the Coronavirus threat". Marca. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  5. ^ "La Liga halted due to the coronavirus crisis". Marca. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  6. ^ "UEFA arranges a meeting with European football's stakeholders". Official UEFA Website. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  7. ^ "Coronavirus live updates: Champions League, Europa League, and LaLiga suspended". Marca. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  8. ^ "All sports, including Serie A, suspended in Italy amidst the coronavirus crisis". InfoBAE. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  9. ^ "LaLiga set to return the week of June 8". Diario Marca. Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  10. ^ "LaLiga SmartBank - Second Division - Debate arises over the decision not to postpone the entire matchday: the aggrieved teams gear up for a showdown". Diario Marca. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  11. ^ Europa Press (23 October 2006). "The Second Division will be named 'Liga BBVA' for the forthcoming 3 years". El Economista. Retrieved 8 September 2012.
  12. ^ "LFP Sponsors". Spanish Professional Football League. Retrieved 8 September 2012.
  13. ^ "EA rebrands the Spanish competition: LaLiga EA Sports and LaLiga Hypermotion". Retrieved 5 July 2023.
  14. ^ "La Federación desvela el misterio: La nueva Segunda B se denominará Primera División RFEF". Diario ABC (in Spanish). 14 September 2020. Retrieved 21 August 2023.
  15. ^ Agencia EFE (3 June 2012). "Deportivo establishes a points record in the Second Division". Diario As.
  16. ^ "Ranking Goals Second Division | BDFutbol". www.bdfutbol.com. Retrieved 21 August 2023.
  17. ^ "Elche, a singular leader". marca.com. 30 May 2013.
  18. ^ "Darwin Núñez, el traspaso más caro de segunda división". www.canalsur.es (in Spanish). Retrieved 21 August 2023.
  19. ^ Spanish League regulations 2010/11 – see pages 12–13 of pdf Archived 27 November 2010 at the Wayback Machine(in Spanish)
  20. ^ "Estadio Carlos Belmonte" (in Spanish). Football Tripper. 16 August 2014. Retrieved 6 January 2020.
  21. ^ "Información" (in Spanish). AD Alcorcón. Retrieved 4 June 2016.
  22. ^ "Amorebieta". Resultados de Futbol (in Spanish). Retrieved 17 September 2020.
  23. ^ "Estadio Municipal El Plantío" (in Spanish). Burgos CF. Archived from the original on 8 July 2016. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
  24. ^ "Estadio Cartagonova" (in Spanish). FC Cartagena. Retrieved 23 July 2020.
  25. ^ "El Eibar inicia la próxima semana la reubicación de los abonados para la próxima temporada" (in Spanish). SD Eibar. 21 May 2019.
  26. ^ "Estadio Martínez Valero" (in Spanish). Elche CF. Archived from the original on 22 December 2015. Retrieved 30 May 2016.
  27. ^ "Facilities – RCDE Stadium". RCD Espanyol. Archived from the original on 18 December 2015. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  28. ^ "El Alcoraz" (in Spanish). SD Huesca. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  29. ^ "Facilities - Butarque". CD Leganés. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  30. ^ "Estadi Ciutat de Valencia". StadiumDB. 20 July 2018.
  31. ^ "El Estadio Municipal de Anduva". CD Mirandés. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  32. ^ "Stadiums". Real Oviedo. Retrieved 30 May 2016.
  33. ^ "Racing Ferrol". Resultados de Futbol (in Spanish). Retrieved 3 June 2021.
  34. ^ "El Estadio". Real Racing Club. Retrieved 3 June 2021.
  35. ^ "El Molinón" (in Spanish). Sporting de Gijón. Archived from the original on 3 October 2020. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  36. ^ "Instalaciones" (in Spanish). CD Tenerife. Retrieved 26 May 2016.
  37. ^ "Estadio José Zorrilla" (in Spanish). Real Valladolid. Archived from the original on 4 October 2018. Retrieved 30 May 2016.
  38. ^ "Estadio La Romareda" (in Spanish). Real Zaragoza. Retrieved 19 October 2019.
  39. ^ a b "La emoción de LaLiga SmartBank más accesible que nunca". Página web oficial de LaLiga | LaLiga (in Spanish). Retrieved 5 July 2023.
  40. ^ "EA SPORTS and LaLiga sign new partnership for the 2023/24 season". Diario AS. 3 July 2023. Retrieved 4 July 2023.

External links[edit]