Segundo Romance

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Segundo Romance
Studio album by Luis Miguel
Released August 30, 1994
Recorded 1993-1994
Record Plant Studios
(Los Angeles, California)
Genre Latin pop (see musical style)
Length 38:57
Language Spanish
Label WEA Latina
Producer Luis Miguel (main), Armando Manzanero, Juan Carlos Calderón, Kiko Cibrian
Luis Miguel chronology
Aries
(1993)
Segundo Romance
(1994)
El Concierto
(1995)
Singles from Segundo Romance
  1. "El Día Que Me Quieras"
    Released: August 1994
  2. "La Media Vuelta"
    Released: November 1994
  3. "Todo y Nada"
    Released: February 1995
  4. "Delirio"
    Released: May 1995

Segundo Romance (Second Romance) is the 13th studio album released by Mexican singer Luis Miguel on August 30, 1994 by Warner Music Group. The album was produced by Miguel himself and co-produced by Armando Manzanero, Juan Carlos Calderón, and Kiko Cibrian. Segundo Romance became one of the biggest-selling album by Miguel in the United States and Latin America, earning album certifications in several countries. It was second best-selling Latin album of the year and the best-selling Latin album of the 1990s by a male artist. Four singles from the album were released; two of which reached #1 on the Top Latin Songs.

Segundo Romance follows the arrangement of Romance in which Miguel interprets classic ballads from the history of Latin America. It received a Grammy Award, a Billboard Latin Music Award, and three Lo Nuestro Awards.

Background[edit]

In 1991, Luis Miguel released Romance, a collection of classic ballads from the history of Latin America. The album became a success and sold over a million copes and received a Grammy Award-nomination. Armando Manzanero, who helped co-produced Romance, is one of Mexico's most prominent songwriter for romantic songs.[1] Juan Carlos Calderón has produced albums for Miguel in the past since his signing on with Warner Music Group Mexico, though he was not involved with Romance.[2]

Commercial release[edit]

Album[edit]

In less than a month after its initial release, Segundo Romance sold over 730,000 copies.[3] It became one of the best-selling Spanish-language albums of the 1990s when it debuted and peaked at #29 on Billboard 200 on the week of September 17, 1994.[4] On the same week, it debuted at #7 on the Top Latin Albums and #4 on the Latin Pop Albums chart.[5][6] Segundo Romance spent a total of 29 nonconsecutive weeks at #1 on the Top Latin Albums chart and 30 nonconsecutive weeks on the at #1 on the Latin Pop Albums chart.[7] The album was the second-best selling of Latin album and best selling Latin pop album of the year.[8] It became the first Spanish-language album to be a certified Platinum for shipping one million copies in the United States.[9][10] The album was a success in parts of Latin America where it received a diamond certification in Argentina and gold in Brazil.[11][12] Segundo Romance even became a hit outside of Latin America in countries such as Saudi Arabia and Finland.[13]

Singles[edit]

The lead single released from the album was the cover of Carlos Gardel's tango song "El Día Que Me Quieras" (The Day That You Want Me) which reach #1 on the Top Latin Songs (formerly Hot Latin Tracks).[14] The second single from the album was the cover of José Alfredo Jimenez's ranchera, "La Media Vuelta" (Turn around) which also reach #1 on the Top Latin Songs chart.[15] The third single, "Todo y Nada" (Everything and Nothing), peaked at #3 on the Top Latin Songs and #1 on the Latin Pop Airplay.[16] The last single, "Delirio" (Delirium), which peaked at #16 on the Top Latin Songs.[17]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[18]
Los Angeles Times 3/4 stars[19]

Jose Promis of Allmusic gave the album a 4.5 out of 5 stars praising Miguel's vocals and production of the album. Promis highlighted "La Media Vuelta" and "Solamente Una Vez" as the album's strong points.[18] In 1995, Segundo Romance received a Grammy Award for Best Latin Pop Performance[20] despite having strong competition by Cristian Castro, Juan Gabriel, La Mafia and Plácido Domingo, who was considered the favorite to win.[21] The success of the album in the Billboard charts earned the singer a Billboard Latin Music Award for Pop Album of the Year.[7] Miguel also received three Lo Nuestro Awards including Pop Male Artist of the Year, Pop Album of the Year, and Video of the Year for "La Media Vuelta".[22]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Original Year[23] Length
1. "El Día Que Me Quieras"   Carlos Gardel, Alfredo Le Pera 1934 3:58
2. "Sin Ti"   Pepe Guízar 1940 3:00
3. "Somos Novios"   Armando Manzanero 1968 3:10
4. "La Media Vuelta"   José Alfredo Jiménez 1963 2:42
5. "Solamente Una Vez"   Agustín Lara 1941 2:58
6. "Todo y Nada"   Vicente Garrido 1957 3:35
7. "Historia de un Amor"   Carlos Almarán 1955 3:55
8. "Como Yo Te Amé"   Armando Manzanero 1986 3:30
9. "Nosotros"   Pedro Junco 1943 4:00
10. "Yo Sé Que Volverás"   Armando Manzanero, Luis Pérez Sabido 1993 3:35
11. "Delirio"   César Portillo de la Luz 1956 4:34

Personnel[edit]

The following information is from Allmusic and from Segundo Romance liner notes.[23][24]

Performance credits[edit]

Technical credits[edit]

Charts and certifications[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "18th Annual ASCAP Latin Music Awards: Armando Manzanero". ASCAP. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  2. ^ "Spain to Honor Music Icon Juan Carlos Calderon". Latin American Herald Tribune. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  3. ^ Cobo-Hanlon, Leila (1994-09-24). "Pop Music Review: Luis Miguel Displays His Musical Range at Universal". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-10-09. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Segundo Romance – Luis Miguel". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 
  5. ^ "Top Latin Albums - Week of September 10, 1994". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1994-09-10. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 
  6. ^ "Latin Pop Albums - Week of September 10, 1994". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1994-09-10. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 
  7. ^ a b Lannert, John (1995-06-10). "Latin Music Conference". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.): LM-54. Retrieved 2010-10-09. 
  8. ^ "Billboard: 1994 Year-End Chart-Toppers". Rock On The Net. Retrieved 2010-09-26. 
  9. ^ a b "American album certifications – Luis Miguel – Segundo Romance". Recording Industry Association of America.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH
  10. ^ Hilburn, Robert (1997-09-20). "Pop Review: Luis Miguel's Crossroad". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-10-09. 
  11. ^ "Argentinian album certifications – Luis Miguel – Segundo Romance". Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers. 
  12. ^ a b "Brazilian album certifications – Luis Miguel – Segundo Romance" (in Portuguese). Associação Brasileira dos Produtores de Discos. 
  13. ^ Obejas, Achy (1996-08-30). "Luis Miguel Grows Up And Moves On With His Latest Albums". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2010-10-09.  More than one of |author= and |last= specified (help)
  14. ^ "El Día Que Me Quieras – Luis Miguel". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1994-09-17. Retrieved 2010-10-10. 
  15. ^ "La Media Vuelta – Luis Miguel". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1994-11-26. Retrieved 2010-10-10. 
  16. ^ "Todo y Nada – Luis Miguel". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1995-02-18. Retrieved 2010-10-10. 
  17. ^ "Delirio – Luis Miguel". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1995-05-20. Retrieved 2010-10-10. 
  18. ^ a b Promis, Jose. "Segundo Romance: Review". Allmusic. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 
  19. ^ Lopetegui, Enrique (1994-11-27). "POP : Do You Hear What We Hear?". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2011-06-26. 
  20. ^ "37th Grammy Awards – 1995". Rock On The Net. 1995-03-01. Retrieved 2010-10-09. 
  21. ^ Lannert, John (1995-01-21). "Artists & Music – Latin Notes". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 107 (3): 36. Retrieved 2010-11-02. 
  22. ^ "Lo Nuestro 1995 – Historia de Premio lo Nuestro". Univision. Retrieved 2010-10-09. 
  23. ^ a b Segundo Romance (CD liner notes). Warner Music Group. August 1994.
  24. ^ "Segundo Romance - Credits". Allmusic. Macromedia Corporation. 1994-08-30. Retrieved 2008-10-08. 
  25. ^ "Hits of the World". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc): 41. 1995-01-07. Retrieved 2011-06-27. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Luis Miguel". Durango.net. Retrieved 2011-06-26.