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Segundo Romance

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Segundo Romance
A man in a dark room is wearing a tuxedo and looking right. His face is partially visible.
Studio album by Luis Miguel
Released August 30, 1994 (1994-08-30)
Recorded 1994
Record Plant Studios
(Los Angeles, California)
Genre
Length 38:57
Language Spanish
Label WEA Latina
Producer
Luis Miguel chronology
Aries
(1993)
Segundo Romance
(1994)
El Concierto
(1995)
Singles from Segundo Romance
  1. "El Día Que Me Quieras"
    Released: August 1994
  2. "La Media Vuelta"
    Released: November 1994
  3. "Todo y Nada"
    Released: 1995
  4. "Delirio"
    Released: April 1995

Segundo Romance is the tenth studio album by Mexican singer Luis Miguel, released on August 30, 1994 by Warner Music Latina. It is a follow-up to his 1991 album, Romance, and features 11 cover versions of Latin ballads that were written between 1934 and 1993. In addition to Miguel, the production involved Juan Carlos Calderón, Kiko Cibrian and Armando Manzanero (who co-produced Romance). Segundo Romance was recorded in early 1994 at the Record Plant in Los Angeles, California.

Miguel promoted the album by touring the United States and Latin America. Segundo Romance was generally well received by music critics, who praised its production, Miguel's vocals and the choice of songs. The album earned Miguel several awards, including a Grammy Award for Best Latin Pop Performance. Four singles were released; the first two, "El Día Que Me Quieras" and "La Media Vuelta", reached number one on the Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart in the United States. "Todo y Nada" and "Delirio" peaked at numbers three and sixteen, respectively, on the same chart. By 1995, Segundo Romance sold over four million copies and received multi-platinum certifications in several Latin American countries, the United States and Spain.

Background and recording[edit]

In 1991 Miguel released his eighth studio album, Romance, a collection of classic boleros, the oldest dating to the 1940s. The album, which was produced by Armando Manzanero and arranged by Bebu Silvetti,[1] was a success in Latin America and sold over seven million copies worldwide.[2][3] It revived interest in the bolero genre, and was the first record by a Spanish-speaking artist to be certified gold in Brazil, Taiwan and the United States.[3] During an interview in July 1993 that followed the release of his ninth studio album, Aries, Miguel expressed interest in a follow-up to Romance.[4] Four months later he said that his next project would be another collection of boleros, initially entitled Romance II, and recording began in March 1994.[5][6]

The album was recorded at the Record Plant in Los Angeles and its final name, Segundo Romance, was announced in June 1994.[7] Miguel was its lead producer; the co-producers were Manzanero (who also co-produced Romance),[8] Juan Carlos Calderón (who worked with Miguel on 20 Años)[9] and Kiko Cibrian (who co-produced Aries).[10] [11] Manzanero helped with arrangements and song selection, Calderón was involved with the string section and Cibrian with production basics.[12] Although the Mexican daily El Siglo de Torreón reported that the production would feature 12 or 14 tracks, with original compositions by Manzanero and Calderón, the album contains 11 covers.[13]

Songs[edit]

Segundo Romance is a collection of classic Latin ballads, the oldest dating to 1934. The album opens with a cover of Carlos Gardel and Alfredo Le Pera's tango, "El Día Que Me Quieras".[14] Three of Manzanero's compositions ("Somos Novios", "Como Yo Te Amé", and "Yo Sé Que Volverás") are covered by Miguel on the album.[12] José Alfredo Jiménez's "La Media Vuelta", originally a ranchera bolero song,[15] incorporates horns, strings, and Spanish guitars; Agustín Lara's "Solamente Una Vez" includes a harmonica section. Other boleros Miguel covers on the album include "Sin Ti", "Todo y Nada", "Historia de un Amor", "Nosotros" and "Delirio".[16]

Singles[edit]

A 22-second sample from Miguel's cover of "El Día Que Me Quieras"; after the first chorus, a bandoneon is heard.

A 16-second sample from Miguel's version of "La Media Vuelta", the second single from the album, which features horns, strings and Spanish guitars

Problems playing these files? See media help.

"El Día Que Me Quieras" was released as the album's lead single on August 5, 1994.[17] It reached number one on the Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart in the United States for the week of September 17, 1994, and topped the chart for five weeks.[18][19] Its music video was directed by Kiko Guerrero and filmed at the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City with Miguel and a 36-piece orchestra.[10][20] The second single, "La Media Vuelta", was released in November 1994 and reached number one on the Hot Latin Songs chart for the week of November 26,[18][21] topping the chart for three weeks.[22] Its music video, directed by Pedro Torres[23] and filmed in black-and-white, features Miguel reminiscing at a bar about a woman who deceived him.[24] The third single, "Todo y Nada",[25] reached number three on the Hot Latin Songs and number one on the Billboard Latin Pop Airplay charts.[18][26] All three singles reached number one in Mexico.[27][28][29] "Delirio", the fourth single from the album, peaked at number 16 on the Hot Latin Songs chart; its music video was filmed in Brazil.[18][25]

Promotion[edit]

Main article: Segundo Romance Tour

To promote the album Miguel began his Segundo Romance Tour with 16 shows at the National Auditorium in Mexico City, which drew an audience of over 155,000.[30] The singer performed throughout Mexico, the United States, Peru and Argentina until December 31, 1994, when the tour concluded in Acapulco.[31] The first part of Miguel's set list featured pop songs and contemporary ballads; during the second half he sang boleros from Segundo Romance and ranchera songs before closing each performance with "Será Que No Me Amas", the Spanish version of the Jackson 5's "Blame it on the Boogie".[32]

In October 1995 Warner Music released the El Concierto live album and video, a compilation of Miguel's performances at the National Auditorium in Mexico City and his concert at the Estadio Vélez in Buenos Aires.[33] Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic praised its production and Miguel's performance.[34]

Critical reception[edit]

AllMusic editor Jose F. Promis gave Segundo Romance four-and-a-half out of five stars, calling it "a first-rate collection of timeless Latin American standards" and praising Miguel's vocals and the album's production. According to Promis, the album "simply illustrates the lush production which went into this surefire hit, which further established Miguel as a first-rate balladeer".[16] Enrique Lopetegui of the Los Angeles Times gave the album three out of four stars, saying that it contained "updated, well-produced versions of classic romantic bolero and tango songs".[35] In Americas magazine, Mark Holston described Segundo Romance as a "superb encore that features performances of such memorable songs as Carlos Gardel's 'El dia que me quieras' and Carlos E. Almaran's 'Historia de un amor'."[36] Howard Cohen of the Miami Herald was less pleased with the album, writing that it "pales in comparison to the original" and (despite liking its music) the "magic is gone". Cohen criticized Miguel's vocals, citing "El Día Que Me Quieras" and "Solamente Una Vez" as examples of a voice "on autopilot", and called the singer's production a "bad idea".[37]

In Argentina, Miguel received the Asociación de Cronistas del Espectáculo award for Latin Ballad Album by a Male Solo Artist in 1994.[38] At the 1995 Grammy Awards Segundo Romance won the Best Latin Pop Album award[39] despite competition from Cristian Castro, Juan Gabriel, La Mafia and Plácido Domingo, who was favored to win by John Lannert of Billboard.[40] At the 7th Lo Nuestro Awards in the same year, Miguel won three awards including Pop Male Artist of the Year, Pop Album of the Year for Segundo Romance and Video of the Year for "La Media Vuelta";[41] "El Día Que Me Quieras" was nominated for a fourth, as Pop Song of the Year.[42] Segundo Romance was the Pop Album of the Year by a Male Artist at the 1995 Billboard Latin Music Awards,[43] and was named Best Album of the Year by the Association of Latin Entertainment Critics.[44] Miguel was the Best-Selling Latin Artist of the Year at the 1995 World Music Awards.[3]

Commercial performance[edit]

Within two days of its release, Segundo Romance sold over one million copies.[45] In Mexico, the album was certified quintuple platinum for shipping 1.25 million copies.[46] In the United States it debuted at number 29 on the Billboard 200 the week of September 10, 1994, the highest debut on the chart at the time for a Spanish-language album.[47] That week, Segundo Romance also debuted at number seven on the Billboard Top Latin Albums chart;[48] the album reached number one a week later, replacing Selena's Amor Prohibido. It spent a total of 29 nonconsecutive weeks atop the chart, and was the second-bestselling Latin album of the year behind Mi Tierra by Gloria Estefan.[49][50] The album topped the Billboard Latin Pop Albums chart for 30 weeks, and was the highest-selling Latin pop album of the year in the U.S.[50][51] Segundo Romance was certified platinum for shipping one million copies,[52] making Miguel the first Latin artist with two platinum discs in the U.S. (the other is Romance).[32][53]

The album was also successful in Spanish-speaking countries. It was certified triple platinum in Paraguay, Uruguay and Central America; double platinum in Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, Spain and Venezuela, and platinum in Ecuador.[46][54] In Brazil, Segundo Romance was certified gold for sales of 50,000 copies.[55] The album reached number one on the Chilean album charts, and was certified sextuple platinum for shipping 150,000 copies.[56][57] In Argentina, it was certified 11× platinum and later received a diamond award for sales of 500,000 copies.[46][58] By 1995, Segundo Romance sold over four million copies worldwide.[59]

Legacy[edit]

Like its predecessor, Romance, Segundo Romance continued to revive interest in bolero music. In the magazine Americas, Mark Holston wrote that the album "proves again that the bolero is back, its heart beating as strongly as ever, its soul alive with tropical passion, a music for every time and all times."[36] According to Enrique Lopetegui of the Los Angeles Times, both albums "created a revival for the bolero—the old-fashioned, string-based romantic messages of unrequited love were embraced even by young listeners."[60] Ed Morales wrote in his book, The Latin Beat: The Rhythms And Roots Of Latin Music From Bossa Nova To Salsa And Beyond, "Beyond merely being a revival, Romance and its 1994 follow-up, Segundo Romance was a significant update of the genre".[61] Chicago Tribune editor Achy Obejas noted that the albums "scored in such unlikely places as Saudi Arabia and Finland."[62] Segundo Romance was followed by two more bolero albums: Romances (1997) and Mis Romances (2001).[63][64] In 1998, WEA Latina released Todos Los Romances, a three-disc compilation of the first-three romance-themed albums.[65]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Year of composition[11] Length
1. "El Día Que Me Quieras"   1934 3:58
2. "Sin Ti"   Pepe Guízar 1940 3:00
3. "Somos Novios"   Armando Manzanero 1968 3:10
4. "La Media Vuelta"   José Alfredo Jiménez 1963 2:42
5. "Solamente Una Vez"   Agustín Lara 1941 2:58
6. "Todo y Nada"   Vicente Garrido 1957 3:35
7. "Historia de un Amor"   Carlos Almarán 1955 3:55
8. "Como Yo Te Amé"   Manzanero 1986 3:30
9. "Nosotros"   Pedro Junco 1943 4:00
10. "Yo Sé Que Volverás"  
  • Manzanero
  • Luis Pérez Sabido
1993 3:35
11. "Delirio"   César Portillo de la Luz 1956 4:34

Credits and personnel[edit]

The following information is from AllMusic and from the Segundo Romance liner notes.[11][66]

Performance credits[edit]

  • Robbie Buchanan – piano, keyboards
  • Jodi Burnett – cello
  • Kenneth Burward-Hoy – viola
  • Andrea Byers – violin
  • Darius Campo – violin
  • Kiko Cibrian – acoustic guitar ("Delirio", "Historia de un Amor", "Todo y Nada"), co-producer
  • Luis Conte – percussion
  • Larry Corbett – cello
  • Rollice Dale – viola
  • Isabelle Daskoff – violin
  • Mario Diaz de Leon – violin
  • Brian Dembow – viola
  • George Doering – acoustic guitar
  • Bruce Donnelly – cello
  • Kirstin Fife – violin
  • Ramon Flores – trumpet ("La Media Vuelta")
  • Matt Funes – viola
  • Harris Goldman – violin
  • Joseph Goodman – violin
  • Endre Granat – violin
  • Gary Grant – brass horn
  • Jerry Hey – brass horn
  • Dan Higgins – brass horn
  • Tiffany Hu – violin
  • Paul Jackson, Jr. – electric guitar
  • Anne Karam – cello
  • Suzie Katayama – cello
  • Leslie Kats – violin
  • Armen Ksadjikian – cello
  • Natalie Leggett – violin
  • Brian Leonard – violin
  • Francisco Loyo – piano, keyboards ("El Día Que Me Quieras")
  • Michael Markman – violin
  • Luis Miguel – lead vocalist, main producer
  • Jorge Moraga – viola
  • Tommy Morgan – harmonica ("Solamente una Vez")
  • Jeff Nathanson – saxophone ("Nosotros")
  • Carolyn Osborn – violin
  • Delia Park – violin
  • Barbara Porter – violin
  • Karie Prescott – viola
  • Debra Price – violin
  • Bill Reichenbach Jr. – horn
  • Bill Rickenbach – brass
  • John "J.R." Robinson – drums
  • Jay Rosen – violin
  • Mark Sazer – violin
  • John Scanlon – viola
  • Frederick Seykora – cello
  • Kwihee Shambanari – violin
  • Earl Smith – oboe
  • Ramón Stagnaro – vihuela, requinto
  • Neil Stubenhaus – bass guitar
  • Jorge Travisano – bandoneon ("El Día Que Me Quieras")
  • Francine Walsh – violin
  • Vivian Wolf – violin

Technical credits[edit]

  • Craig Brock – assistant engineer, mixing assistant
  • Juan Carlos Calderón – co-producer
  • Alfredo Gatica – art direction, art coordinator
  • Bernie Grundman – mastering
  • Brandon Harris – engineer, assistant Engineer
  • Armando Manzanero – co-producer
  • Brian Pollack – engineer, assistant engineer
  • Jose L. Quintana – production coordination
  • Rick Raponi – engineer, assistant engineer
  • Robbes Stieglitz – engineer, assistant engineer
  • Phil Smith – assistant engineer
  • Carlos Somonte – photography
  • Paul McKenna – engineer, mixing

Charts and certifications[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ "Dimes y Directes". El Siglo de Torreón (in Spanish) (Editora de la Laguna). October 12, 1992. p. 51. 
  3. ^ a b c Candelaria, Cordelia; Garcia, Peter; Adalma, Arturo (2004). Encyclopedia of Latino popular culture 2. Westport, United States: Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 551–552. ISBN 9780313322150. Retrieved March 14, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Luis Miguel segunda versión de "Romance"". El Siglo de Torreón (in Spanish) (Editora de la Laguna). July 21, 1993. p. 43. 
  5. ^ "Luis Miguel segunda versión de "Romance"". El Siglo de Torreón (in Spanish) (Editora de la Laguna). November 18, 1993. p. 40. 
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  8. ^ "Vida y obra de Fina Patrón". El Siglo de Torreón (in Spanish) (Editora de la Laguna). May 25, 1994. p. 51. 
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  15. ^ González, Aurelio (2007). La copla de México (in Spanish). El Colegio de México. p. 166. ISBN 9789681212995. 
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  54. ^ a b Salaverri, Fernando (2005). Sólo éxitos. Año a año. 1959-2002 [Only Hits. Year by year. 1959-2002] (in Spanish). Madrid, Spain: Iberautor Promociones Culturales. p. 962. ISBN 9788480486392. 
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