Selloi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Selloi were inhabitants of Epirus in ancient Greece, in a region between Dodona — site of the oldest reported oracle — and the Achelous river; Aristotle named the area ancient Hellas. A group who were formerly called Graeci (Graikoi) and later Hellenes lived there as well.[1] According to Homer, they were priests of the Dodonian Zeus.[2] and the word probably means "sacrificers" (compare Gothic saljan, "present, sacrifice").[3]

Selloi were the priests of Dodonian Zeus[4] There is currently no satisfactory etymology of the name Hellenes. Some scholars assert that the name Selloi changed to Sellanes and then to Hellanes/Hellenes. [3] The name may probably be compared with Proto-Indo-European *sa(e)wol, soh2wol, Latin sol, Greek helios, and Sanskrit suryah.) [5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Aristotle:Meteorologica Book 1 Part 14
  2. ^ "King Zeus, lord of Dodona, god of the Pelasgi, who dwellest afar, you who hold wintry Dodona in your sway, where your prophets the Selloi dwell around you."Homer, Iliad book 16,233-235
  3. ^ a b Beekes entry 6701: Selloi.Greek Etymological Dictionary
  4. ^ Homer, Iliad 16.233–35: "King Zeus, lord of Dodona, ... you who hold wintry Dodona in your sway, where your prophets the Selloi dwell around you."
  5. ^ Online Etymology Dictionary. "Sol"