Semi-Fowler's position

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The Semi-Fowler's position is a position in which a patient, typically in a hospital or nursing home in positioned on their back with the head and trunk raised to between 15 to 45 degrees,[1] although 30 degrees is the most frequently used bed angle.[2][3] The elevation is less than that of the fowler's position, and may include the foot of the bed being raised at the knee to bend the legs.

Upright at 90 degrees is full or high Fowler's position. Semi-Fowler's would be tilted back to approximately 30 degrees.

Indications[edit]

The position is useful in promoting lung expansion[4] as gravity pulls the diaphragm downward, allowing for expansion and ventilation.[1] It is also recommended during gastric feeding to reduce the risk of regurgitation and aspiration.[1]

During childbirth, the semi-fowler's position is preferred over the full-fowler's as it is generally more comfortable for the mother, and reduces the need for analgesics and surgical interventions such as operative vaginal delivery or cesarean sections.[5]

The semi-fowler's position is also indicated when assessing the jugular veins.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Kozier and Erb's fundamentals of nursing. Berman, Audrey., Kozier, Barbara., Erb, Glenora Lea, 1937-2001. (2nd ed.). Frenchs Forest, N.S.W.: Pearson Australia. 2012. p. 1277. ISBN 9781442541696. OCLC 769349688. 
  2. ^ Potter & Perry's fundamentals of nursing. Crisp, Jackie., Taylor, Catherine. (4th ed.). Chatswood, N.S.W.: Mosby. 2012. p. 1028. ISBN 9780729541107. OCLC 811073338. 
  3. ^ Carter, Pamela. "Lippincott's Textbook for Nursing Assistants: A Humanistic Approach". p. 189. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Kozier and Erb's fundamentals of nursing. Berman, Audrey., Kozier, Barbara., Erb, Glenora Lea, 1937-2001. (2nd ed.). Frenchs Forest, N.S.W.: Pearson Australia. 2012. pp. 702, 881. ISBN 9781442541689. OCLC 769349688. 
  5. ^ Murray, Michelle. "Labor and Delivery Nursing: Guide to Evidence-Based Practice". Retrieved 17 May 2015.