Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine

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Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine
Awarded for The best semi-professional magazine devoted primarily to science fiction or fantasy
Presented by World Science Fiction Society
First awarded 1984
Most recent winner Uncanny Magazine (edited by Lynne M. Thomas, Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Erika Ensign, and Steven Schapansky)
Website thehugoawards.org
Stephen H. Segal accepting the 2009 Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine for Weird Tales
Julia Rios and Michi Trota accepting the 2017 Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine for Uncanny Magazine

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award.[1] The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".[2][3] The Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine is given each year for semi-professionally-edited magazines related to science fiction or fantasy which had published four or more issues, with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year.[4] Awards were once also given out for professional magazines in the professional magazine category, and are still awarded for fan magazines in the fanzine category.

The award was first presented in 1984, and has been given annually since. A "semiprozine" is defined for the award as a magazine in the field that is not professional but that (unlike a fanzine) either pays its contributors in something other than copies, or is (generally) available only for payment.[5][note 1] In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given.[7] To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954, but the category failed to receive enough to form a ballot each time.[8]

Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. The 1953 through 1956 and 1958 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up magazines, but since 1959 all six candidates were recorded.[7] Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held.[9] Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations.[10] Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year.[1][11] At the 2008 business meeting, an amendment to the World Science Fiction Society's Constitution was passed which would remove this category. The vote to ratify this amendment was held the following year; the ratification failed and the category remained. Instead, a committee was formed to recommend improvements to the category and related categories.[12]

During the 35 nomination years, 36 magazines run by 105 editors have been nominated. Of these, only 8 magazines run by 23 editors have won. Locus won 22 times and was nominated every year until a rules change in 2012 made it ineligible for the category. Uncanny Magazine has won 3 times in a row, 2016–2018, while Science Fiction Chronicle, Clarkesworld Magazine, and Lightspeed are the only other magazines to win more than once, with 2 awards out of 18 nominations, 3 out of 4, and 2 out of 5, respectively, while Ansible has won 1 out of 7 nominations, Interzone has won 1 out of 28, and Weird Tales has won 1 out of its 3 nominations. As editor of Locus Charles N. Brown won 21 of 27 nominations, though he shared 5 of those awards with Kirsten Gong-Wong, 3 with Liza Groen Trombi and 2 with Jennifer A. Hall. Uncanny's awards were earned by a team of 5 people, Lynne M. Thomas, Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Erika Ensign, and Steven Schapansky. The sole editor for Chronicle's awards was Andrew I. Porter, while David Pringle earned Interzone's, and Ann VanderMeer and Stephen H. Segal were the editors for Weird Tales's victory. Lightspeed's wins were under John Joseph Adams, Rich Horton, and Stefan Rudnicki, with Wendy N. Wagner and Christie Yant added for the second win, while David Langford was the editor when Ansible was awarded. Clarkesworld Magazine's winning years were under Neil Clarke, Sean Wallace, and Kate Baker, with 2 of the three also under Cheryl Morgan and the other under Jason Heller. The New York Review of Science Fiction has received the most number of nominations without ever winning at 22, under the helm of David G. Hartwell, Kathryn Cramer, Kevin J. Maroney, and 8 other editors. The next highest number of nominations without winning is 7 for Speculations under Kent Brewster, Denise Lee, and Susan Fry.

Winners and nominees[edit]

In the following table, the years correspond to the date of the ceremony, rather than when the work was first published. Each date links to the "year in literature" article corresponding with when the work was eligible. Entries with a blue background won the award for that year; those with a white background are the other nominees on the short-list. Note that Thrust was renamed to Quantum and was nominated under both names; no other nominated magazine has undergone a name change during the period the award has been active.[13]

  *   Winners and joint winners

Year Work Editor(s) Ref.
1984 Locus* Charles N. Brown [14]
Fantasy Review Robert A. Collins [14]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [14]
Science Fiction Review Richard E. Geis [14]
Whispers Stuart David Schiff [14]
1985 Locus* Charles N. Brown [15]
Fantasy Review Robert A. Collins [15]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [15]
Science Fiction Review Richard E. Geis [15]
Whispers Stuart David Schiff [15]
1986 Locus* Charles N. Brown [16]
Fantasy Review Robert A. Collins [16]
Interzone Simon Ounsley and David Pringle [16]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [16]
Science Fiction Review Richard E. Geis [16]
1987 Locus* Charles N. Brown [17]
Fantasy Review Robert A. Collins [17]
Interzone Simon Ounsley and David Pringle [17]
Science Fiction Review Richard E. Geis [17]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [17]
1988 Locus* Charles N. Brown [18]
Aboriginal Science Fiction Charles C. Ryan [18]
Interzone Simon Ounsley and David Pringle [18]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [18]
Thrust Doug Fratz [18]
1989 Locus* Charles N. Brown [19]
Interzone David Pringle [19]
The New York Review of Science Fiction David G. Hartwell, Patrick Nielsen Hayden, Teresa Nielsen Hayden, Susan Palwick, and Kathryn Cramer [19]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [19]
Thrust Doug Fratz [19]
1990 Locus* Charles N. Brown [20]
Interzone David Pringle [20]
The New York Review of Science Fiction David G. Hartwell, Patrick Nielsen Hayden, Teresa Nielsen Hayden, Susan Palwick, and Kathryn Cramer [20]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [20]
Thrust Doug Fratz [20]
1991 Locus* Charles N. Brown [21]
Interzone David Pringle [21]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, and Gordon Van Gelder [21]
Quantum Doug Fratz [21]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [21]
1992 Locus* Charles N. Brown [22]
Interzone David Pringle [22]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, and Gordon Van Gelder [22]
Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine Kristine Kathryn Rusch and Dean Wesley Smith [22]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [22]
1993 Science Fiction Chronicle* Andrew I. Porter [23]
Interzone David Pringle [23]
Locus Charles N. Brown [23]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, Ariel Haméon, and Tad Dembinski [23]
Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine Dean Wesley Smith and Jonathan E. Bond [23]
1994 Science Fiction Chronicle* Andrew I. Porter [24]
Interzone David Pringle [24]
Locus Charles N. Brown [24]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, Ariel Haméon, and Tad Dembinski [24]
Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine Dean Wesley Smith and Jonathan E. Bond [24]
Tomorrow Speculative Fiction Algis Budrys [24]
1995 Interzone* David Pringle [25]
Locus Charles N. Brown [25]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, Ariel Haméon, and Tad Dembinski [25]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [25]
Tomorrow Speculative Fiction Algis Budrys [25]
1996 Locus* Charles N. Brown [26]
Crank! Bryan Cholfin [26]
Interzone David Pringle [26]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, Ariel Haméon, and Tad Dembinski [26]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [26]
1997 Locus* Charles N. Brown [27]
Interzone David Pringle [27]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, Tad Dembinski, Ariel Haméon, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [27]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [27]
Speculations Kent Brewster [27]
1998 Locus* Charles N. Brown [28]
Interzone David Pringle [28]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, Ariel Haméon, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [28]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [28]
Speculations Kent Brewster [28]
1999 Locus* Charles N. Brown [29]
Interzone David Pringle [29]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, Ariel Haméon, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [29]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [29]
Speculations Kent Brewster [29]
2000 Locus* Charles N. Brown [30]
Interzone David Pringle [30]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, Ariel Haméon, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [30]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [30]
Speculations Kent Brewster [30]
2001 Locus* Charles N. Brown [31]
Interzone David Pringle [31]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, Ariel Haméon, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [31]
Science Fiction Chronicle Andrew I. Porter [31]
Speculations Denise Lee and Susan Fry [31]
2002 Locus* Charles N. Brown [32]
Absolute Magnitude Warren Lapine [32]
Interzone David Pringle [32]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [32]
Speculations Susan Fry and Kent Brewster [32]
2003 Locus* Charles N. Brown, Jennifer A. Hall, and Kirsten Gong-Wong [33]
Ansible David Langford [33]
Interzone David Pringle [33]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [33]
Speculations Kent Brewster [33]
2004 Locus* Charles N. Brown, Jennifer A. Hall, and Kirsten Gong-Wong [34]
Ansible David Langford [34]
Interzone David Pringle [34]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [34]
Third Alternative Andy Cox [34]
2005 Ansible* David Langford [35]
Interzone David Pringle and Andy Cox [35]
Locus Charles N. Brown, Jennifer A. Hall, and Kirsten Gong-Wong [35]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [35]
Third Alternative Andy Cox [35]
2006 Locus* Charles N. Brown, Kirsten Gong-Wong, and Liza Groen Trombi [36]
Ansible David Langford [36]
Emerald City Cheryl Morgan [36]
Interzone Andy Cox [36]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [36]
2007 Locus* Charles N. Brown, Kirsten Gong-Wong, and Liza Groen Trombi [37]
Ansible David Langford [37]
Interzone Andy Cox [37]
Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet Kelly Link and Gavin Grant [37]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [37]
2008 Locus* Charles N. Brown, Kirsten Gong-Wong, and Liza Groen Trombi [38]
Ansible David Langford [38]
Helix SF William Sanders and Lawrence Watt-Evans [38]
Interzone Andy Cox [38]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, Kristine Dikeman, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [38]
2009 Weird Tales* Ann VanderMeer and Stephen H. Segal [39]
Clarkesworld Magazine Neil Clarke, Nick Mamatas, and Sean Wallace [39]
Interzone Andy Cox [39]
Locus Charles N. Brown, Kirsten Gong-Wong, and Liza Groen Trombi [39]
The New York Review of Science Fiction Kathryn Cramer, Kristine Dikeman, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney [39]
2010 Clarkesworld Magazine* Neil Clarke, Sean Wallace, and Cheryl Morgan [40]
Ansible David Langford [40]
Interzone Andy Cox [40]
Locus Charles N. Brown, Kirsten Gong-Wong, and Liza Groen Trombi [40]
Weird Tales Ann VanderMeer and Stephen H. Segal [40]
2011 Clarkesworld Magazine* Neil Clarke, Sean Wallace, and Cheryl Morgan; podcast directed by Kate Baker [41]
Interzone Andy Cox [41]
Lightspeed John Joseph Adams [41]
Locus Liza Groen Trombi and Kirsten Gong-Wong [41]
Weird Tales Ann VanderMeer and Stephen H. Segal [41]
2012 Locus* Liza Groen Trombi and Kirsten Gong-Wong [42]
Apex Magazine Catherynne M. Valente, Lynne M. Thomas, and Jason Sizemore [42]
Interzone Andy Cox [42]
Lightspeed John Joseph Adams [42]
The New York Review of Science Fiction David G. Hartwell, Kevin J. Maroney, Kris Dikeman, and Avram Grumer [42]
2013 Clarkesworld Magazine* Neil Clarke, Jason Heller, Sean Wallace, and Kate Baker [43]
Apex Magazine Lynne M. Thomas, Jason Sizemore, and Michael Damian Thomas [43]
Beneath Ceaseless Skies Scott H. Andrews [43]
Lightspeed John Joseph Adams and Stefan Rudnicki [43]
Strange Horizons Niall Harrison, Jed Hartman, Brit Mandelo, An Owomoyela, Julia Rios, Abigail Nussbaum, A. J. Odasso, Sonya Taaffe, Dave Nagdeman, and Rebecca Cross [43]
2014 Lightspeed* John Joseph Adams, Rich Horton and Stefan Rudnicki [44]
Apex Magazine Lynne M. Thomas, Jason Sizemore, and Michael Damian Thomas [44]
Beneath Ceaseless Skies Scott H. Andrews [44]
Interzone Andy Cox [44]
Strange Horizons Niall Harrison, Brit Mandelo, An Owomoyela, Julia Rios, Abigail Nussbaum, A. J. Odasso, Sonya Taaffe, Rebecca Cross, Anaea Lay, and Shane Garvin [44]
2015 Lightspeed* John Joseph Adams, Stefan Rudnicki, Rich Horton, Wendy N. Wagner, and Christie Yant [45]
Abyss & Apex Magazine Wendy S. Delmater [45]
Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine David Kernot and Sue Bursztynski [45]
Beneath Ceaseless Skies Scott H. Andrews [45]
Strange Horizons Niall Harrison [45]
2016 Uncanny Magazine* Lynne M. Thomas, Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Erika Ensign, Steven Schapansky [46]
Beneath Ceaseless Skies Scott H. Andrews [46]
Daily Science Fiction Michele-Lee Barasso and Jonathan Laden [46]
Sci Phi Journal Jason Rennie [46]
Strange Horizons Catherine Krahe, Julia Rios, A. J. Odasso, Vanessa Rose Phin, and Maureen Kincaid Speller [46]
2017 Uncanny Magazine* Lynne M. Thomas, Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Julia Rios, Erika Ensign, and Steven Schapansky [47]
Beneath Ceaseless Skies Scott H. Andrews [47]
Cirsova Heroic Fantasy and Science Fiction Magazine P. Alexander [47]
GigaNotoSaurus Rashida J. Smith [47]
Strange Horizons Niall Harrison, Catherine Krahe, Vajra Chandrasekera, Vanessa Rose Phin, Li Chua, Aishwarya Subramanian, Tim Moore, and Anaea Lay [47]
The Book Smugglers Ana Grilo and Thea James [47]
2018 Uncanny Magazine* Lynne M. Thomas, Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Julia Rios, Erika Ensign, and Steven Schapansky [48]
Beneath Ceaseless Skies Scott H. Andrews [48]
The Book Smugglers Ana Grilo and Thea James [48]
Escape Pod Mur Lafferty, S.B. Divya, Norm Sherman, and Benjamin C. Kinney [48]
Fireside Magazine Brian White, Julia Rios, Elsa Sjunneson-Henry, Mikki Kendall, and Pablo Defendini [48]
Strange Horizons Kate Dollarhyde, Gautam Bhatia, A.J. Odasso, Lila Garrott, Heather McDougal, Ciro Faienza, Tahlia Day, and Vanessa Rose Phin [48]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The definition requires that the magazine meet two of the following criteria: it must "have an average press run of at least 1000 copies; pay its contributors and/or staff in other than copies of the publication; provide at least half the income of any one person; have at least 15% of its total space occupied by advertising; or announce itself to be a semiprozine."[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Locus index to SF Awards: About the Hugo Awards". Locus. Oakland, California: Locus. Archived from the original on 2010-01-03. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
  2. ^ Jordison, Sam (2008-08-07). "An International Contest We Can Win". The Guardian. London, England: The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2009-07-29. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
  3. ^ Cleaver, Emily (2010-04-20). "Hugo Awards Announced". Litro Magazine. London, England: Ocean Media. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
  4. ^ "The World Science Fiction Society Rules 1971". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-05-19. 
  5. ^ "WSFS Constitution, Standing Rules, & Business Passed On". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2013-01-13. Retrieved 2013-02-14. 
  6. ^ Nicholls, Peter; Ashley, Mike; Langford, David. "Culture : Semiprozine : SFE : Science Fiction Encyclopedia". sf-encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2017-02-23. 
  7. ^ a b "The Hugo Awards: FAQ". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-20. 
  8. ^ "The Locus index to SF Awards: About the Retro Hugo Awards". Locus. Oakland, California: Locus. Archived from the original on 2010-01-03. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
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  13. ^ Fratz, Doug (Spring 1993). "The Twenty-Year Spree: A Personal History of Thrust/Quantum". Quantum. Doug Fratz (43): 51–56. ISSN 0198-6686. 
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  37. ^ a b c d e "2007 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  38. ^ a b c d e "2008 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  39. ^ a b c d e "2009 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  40. ^ a b c d e "2010 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2011-04-25. 
  41. ^ a b c d e "2011 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2012-04-09. Retrieved 2012-04-09. 
  42. ^ a b c d e "2012 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2012-04-09. Retrieved 2012-04-09. 
  43. ^ a b c d e "2013 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2015-09-06. Retrieved 2013-04-03. 
  44. ^ a b c d e "2014 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2015-09-06. Retrieved 2014-04-20. 
  45. ^ a b c d e "2015 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2015-09-05. Retrieved 2015-09-06. 
  46. ^ a b c d e "2016 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2017-08-11. Retrieved 2016-04-27. 
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External links[edit]