Sequoia 300 Sequoia

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300 Sequoia
Role Two-seat utility and aerobatic aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Sequoia Aircraft Corporation
Designer David Thurston
First flight 26 April 1992
Number built 1
Developed from Sequoia Falco

The Sequio 300 Sequoia is an American two-seat utility or aerobatic aircraft, designed by David Thurston for Sequoia Aircraft Corporation for sale as a kit or set of plans for homebuilding.[1]

Design and development[edit]

The Sequioa, derived from the smaller Frati designed F.8 Falco, is a low-wing cantilever monoplane with a retractable tricycle landing gear and powered by a 300 hp (224 kW) Textron Lycoming TIO-540-S1AD turbocharged piston engine, although it was designed to take any Lycoming engine between 235-300 hp (175-224 kW).[2] It has an enclosed cockpit for two with side-by-side seating.[2]

The design was originally proposed in the 1970s but the first prototype did not fly until 26 April 1992 and by 1993 the program was being offered for sale.[1][2]

Variants[edit]

Model 300 Sequoia
Side-by-side seating version.[1]
Model 301 Sequoia
Proposed variant with tandem seating.[1]
Model 302 Kodiak
A proposed four-seat variant with gull-wing doors.[1]

Specifications (Utility)[edit]

Data from [2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 25 ft 0 in (7.62 m)
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 0 in (9.14 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 6 in (2.90 m)
  • Wing area: 130 ft2 (12.08 m2)
  • Empty weight: 1800 lb (816 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2800 lb (1270 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Textron Lycoming TIO-540-S1AD turbocharged piston engine, 300 hp (224 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 225 mph (362 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 213 mph (343 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 86 mph (139 km/h)
  • Range: 1000 miles (1609 km)
  • Service ceiling: 25,000 ft (7620 m)
  • Rate of climb: 2180 ft/min (11 m/s)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Sequoia:high performance homebuilt". Flight International: 770. 10 March 1979. Retrieved 29 October 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d Lambert 1994, pp, 629-630

Bibliography[edit]

  • Lambert, Mark, ed. (1994). Jane's All the World's Aircraft1994-95. Coulsdon, Surrey, United Kingdom: Jane's Information Group. ISBN 0-7106-1160-9. 

External links[edit]