List of Serb countries and regions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Serbian lands)
Jump to: navigation, search
Main article: History of the Serbs

The term Serbian lands has been used for medieval Serbian state creations, for Serb-inhabited territories in the Ottoman and Habsburg period (15th–19th century), and in political-geopraphical use[1] since the independence of Serbia and Montenegro. During the Yugoslav wars it was used for the ethnic unification of Serbs through union of Serbia, Montenegro, Republika Srpska and Republic of Srpska Krajina.

History[edit]

The "medieval Serbian lands" included Serbian tribes, polities and monarchies, such as Raška, Serbian Empire, etc.[1]

Roots of the Greater Serbian ideology are often traced back to Serbian minister Ilija Garašanin's Načertanije (1844),[2] who envisioned a reconstruction of the Serbian Empire and unification of "Serbian lands", which included Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, northern Albania, parts of Dalmatia and the Habsburg Military Frontier.[3]

In 1857, while traveling across "Ancient Serbia", Alexander Fedorovich Gilferding (1831-1872), a Russian Slavist and travel writer of German origin, wrote: "an Orthodox Serb, wherever he might live – in Bosnia, Herzegovina, Dalmatia, Hungary, Principality of Serbia – has, besides a church, one great homeland, Serbian land, which is, to tell the truth, divided among many masters, but it exists as an ideal, as the land of the unified Orthodox Serbian nation. He has his own oral tradition, folklore; he knows about Serbian Saint Sava, Serbian Emperor Dušan, Serbian martyr Lazar, hero Kraljević Marko. His current life rests upon the foundations of his nation and it is permeated with the previous historical life of the nation".[4]

The term was used by political theorist Dobrica Ćosić for the ethnic unification of Serbs through union of Serbia, Montenegro, Republika Srpska and Republic of Srpska Krajina during the Yugoslav wars (1991–95).[5]


Middle Ages[edit]

Image Map Name Years Area Notes
PetrovaCrkva2008.jpg Central and Eastern Europe around 950 AD.png Serbian Principality ~768-969 Serbia
BiH
Montenegro
Croatia
Albania
Held by the Vlastimirović dynasty. Časlav (r. 927-960) liberated the Serbian principalities from Bulgarian rule in 927. He enlarged Serbia, uniting the tribes of Bosnia, Herzegovina, Old Serbia and Montenegro (incorporated Zeta, Pagania, Zahumlje, Travunia,[6] Konavle, Bosnia and Rascia into Serbia, "ι Σερβλια").[7][8] He took over regions previously held by Michael of Zahumlje, who disappears from sources in 925.[6] De Administrando Imperio describes his realm: the shores of the Adriatic Sea, the Sava river and the Morava valley as well as today's northern Albania.[8]
Miroslavs Gospel.jpg Dalmatian principalities, 9th century.png Principalities
Kralj Mihajlo Vojislavich.jpg South-Eastern Europe, ca. 1090, by User-Hxseek.png Kingdom of Duklja (Doclea) 1030s-1186 Serbia
BiH
Montenegro
Croatia
Albania
Flag of Serbia 1281.svg Map of the Principality of Serbia, 12th century.png Serbian Grand Principality [Rascia] 1091-1217 Serbia
BiH
Montenegro
Croatia
Albania
Macedonia
Flag of Serbia 1281.svg Balkans 1265.jpg Serbian Kingdom 1217-1345 Serbia
BiH
Montenegro
Croatia
Albania
Macedonia
Fresco of Stefan Dragutin, Arilje.jpg Srem04-en.png Kingdom of Syrmia 1282–1325 Serbia
BiH
Car Dušan, Manastir Lesnovo, XIV vek.jpg Servia1350AD.png Serbian Empire 1345-1371 Serbia
Macedonia
Montenegro
Albania
Greece
Bulgaria
Krusevacki Grad Donzon1.jpg Central balkans 1373 1395.png dissolution of Serbian Empire into:
Grb kosaca.gif Stefan Vukcic and the war in Zeta 1441.jpg Duchy of Saint Sava (till 1449 Duchy of Hum and the Coast) 1448–1483 Bosnia and Herzegovina
Montenegro
Serbia
Croatia
Đurađ Branković, Esphigmenou charter (1429).jpg Serbian Despotate (1422)-en.svg Serbian Despotate 1402-1459 (titular Serbian despots existed until 1537 in the medieval Kingdom of Hungary) Serbia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Montenegro
Albania


1526-1918[edit]

Image Map Name Years Area Notes
Tsar Jovan Nenad monument.jpg Serbian empire06 map.png State of Jovan Nenad 1526-1527 Serbia
Romania
Hungary
Croatia
Stari Slankamen, remains of the medieval fortress.jpg Radoslav celnik01.png Duchy of Syrmia of Radoslav Čelnik 1527–1530 Serbia
Croatia
Srbin vojnik srem 1742.jpg Militargrenze, Wojwodowena und Banat.jpg Military Frontier 1579–1882 Serbia
Croatia
Romania
Hungary
Nándorfehérvár-18th century.jpg Serbia1718 1739.png Habsburg Kingdom of Serbia 1718–1739 Serbia
CoA of the Kingdom of Slavonia.png Slavonia01.png Kingdom of Slavonia 1745–1868 Serbia
Croatia
New serbia map.png Map of New Serbia and Slavo-Serbia New Serbia 1752–1764 Ukraine
Slavo serbia map.png Map of New Serbia and Slavo-Serbia Slavo-Serbia 1753–1764 Ukraine
Koča's Frontier 1788–1791 Serbia
Karađorđe Petrović, by Vladimir Borovikovsky, 1816.jpg Serbia1809.png Karađorđe's Serbia 1804–1813 Serbia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Montenegro
Bulgaria
Prince Milos Obrenovic.jpg Serbia1817 1913.png Princedom of Serbia 1817–1882 Serbia
The May Assembly 1848 in Sremski Karlovci.jpg Vojvodina03.png Serbian Voivodeship 1848–1849 Serbia
Croatia
Hungary
Romania
Grosswojwod.jpg Map of Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar (1849-1860).png Voivodeship of Serbia and Tamiš Banat 1849–1860 Serbia
Romania
Hungary
Proglasenje kraljevine srbije 1882.jpg Kingdom of Serbia in 1913 Kingdom of Serbia 1882–1918 Serbia
Republic of Macedonia

1918-1990s[edit]

Since 1990s[edit]

Present political entities[edit]

Countries and territories with Serb population in 2010

This is the list of the current states and regions where Serbs are in absolute or relative ethnic majority, are one of the constitutional or recognized peoples or Serbian language is official:

Diaspora[edit]

Main article: Serb diaspora

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Vuković & Vemić 2014.
  2. ^ Cohen, Philip J.; Riesman, David (1996). Serbia's Secret War: Propaganda and the Deceit of History. Texas A&M University Press. p. 3. ISBN 0-89096-760-1. 
  3. ^ Balazs Trencsenyi; Michal Kopecek (1 November 2006). National Romanticism: The Formation of National Movements. Central European University Press. pp. 240–. ISBN 978-963-7326-60-8. 
  4. ^ "Elements Of Ethnic Identification Of The Serbs" (PDF). p. 727. 
  5. ^ Dejan Jović (January 2009). Yugoslavia: A State that Withered Away. Purdue University Press. pp. 135–. ISBN 978-1-55753-495-8. 
  6. ^ a b The entry of the Slavs into Christendom, p. 209
  7. ^ The early medieval Balkans, p. 160
  8. ^ a b Južnoslavensko pitanje, p. 48
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "Information on the status of Serbian people in the neighbouring countries, Ministry for Diaspora, Republic of Serbia". Archived from the original on 2007-11-24. Retrieved 2007-05-15. 

Sources[edit]