Sergio Bonelli Editore

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Sergio Bonelli Editore
Sergio Bonelli al Lucca Comics 2009.jpg
Sergio Bonelli at Lucca Comics & Games in 2009.
Predecessor Casa Audace Editrice (1940–1957)
Edizioni Araldo (1957–c. 1973)
CEPIM (c. 1973–c. 1987)
Daim Press (c. 1974–c. 1988)
Altamira (c. 1979)
Founded 1940; 76 years ago (1940) in Italy
Founder Gian Luigi Bonelli
Country of origin Italy
Headquarters location Milan
Key people Sergio Bonelli
Publication types Comics, magazines
Fiction genres Adventure, Western, horror, mystery, science fiction
Official website http://www.sergiobonellieditore.it

Sergio Bonelli Editore (formerly CEPIM and other names) is a publishing house of Italian comics founded in 1940 by Gian Luigi Bonelli (1908–2011). It takes its name from its former president, comic book writer Sergio Bonelli (1932–2011), son of Gian Luigi. The company popularized the comic book format that became known as Bonelliano. These comic books presented complete stories in 100+ black-and-white pages in a pocket book format. The subject matter was always adventure, whether Western, horror, mystery, or science fiction. The bonelliani are to date the most popular form of comics in Italy.

The company was founded as Casa Audace Editrice in 1940. In 1957, when Sergio took over as director, the press was renamed to Edizioni Araldo. In subsequent years the name of the press was changed to CEPIM, Daim Press, and Altamira — sometimes being known by two names simultaneously.[1] In c. 1990, it was renamed Sergio Bonelli Editore in honor of the younger Bonelli.

The company has published Tex Willer, created by Gian Luigi Bonelli and Aurelio Galleppini, since 1948.

Sergio Bonelli (pseudonym Guido Nolitta) and artist Gallieno Ferri's Zagor was first published by the company in 1961.

In the 1970s the company published Un uomo un'avventura ("A Man An Adventure"), a series of graphic novels by authors such as Bonvi, Guido Crepax, Hugo Pratt and Sergio Toppi.

Publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Dream Factory," Sergio Bonelli Editore website. Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.

External links[edit]