Seth Williams (USMC)

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Seth Williams
Seth Williams (USMC).jpg
Major general Seth Williams, USMC
Born (1880-01-19)January 19, 1880
Foxborough, Massachusetts
Died July 29, 1963(1963-07-29) (aged 83)
Washington, D.C.
Buried Arlington National Cemetery
Allegiance  United States of America
Service/branch Seal of the United States Marine Corps.svg United States Marine Corps
Years of service 1903-1944
Rank US-O8 insignia.svg Major General
Service number 0-1066
Commands held Quartermaster of the Marine Corps
Depot of Supplies, San Francisco
Depot of Supplies, Philadelphia
Battles/wars World War I
Rhineland Occupation
Yangtze Patrol
World War II
Awards Legion of Merit

Seth Williams (January 19, 1880 – July 29, 1963) was an officer of the United States Marine Corps with the rank of major general, who served at Headquarters Marine Corps as Quartermaster General of the United States Marine Corps during the years 1937–1944.

Born January 19, 1880, in Foxboro, Massachusetts, Williams arrived at Norwich University with the class on 1903 in the fall of 1899 and rose through the ranks his four years on the Hill, eventually leading the Corps of Cadets his senior year as the cadet major. Commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps in June 1903, Williams held multiple assignments as a junior officer, eventually serving in quartermaster assignments at both the brigade and post level, leading to his assignment as the Officer in Charge – Purchasing Division, Office of the Quartermaster of the Marine Corps.[1]

Later career[edit]

On 1 December 1937, Williams was transferred to Washington, D.C. and relieved Major General Hugh L. Matthews as Quartermaster General of the United States Marine Corps at Headquarters Marine Corps. He subsequently supervised the construction of the new training centers such as Camp Pendelton or Camp Lejeune and was also responsible for the transportation of troops to combat zones, and the development of supply and distribution depots in the South and Central Pacific areas.[2] While in this capacity, he was promoted to the rank of Major general in April 1942.

Williams served in this capacity throughout World War II and finally was relieved by Major General William P. T. Hill on February 1, 1944. For his service as Quartermaster of the Marine Corps, he was decorated with Legion of Merit by the Secretary of the Navy, Frank Knox.[3][4]

Seth Williams Boulevard on Camp Lejune is named in his honor.

Following his retirement, Williams resided at Army and Navy Club Building in Washington, D.C. and died there on July 29, 1963. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery together with his wife Mary Baily Williams (1880-1958).[5]

Decorations[edit]

Here is the ribbon bar of Major General Seth Williams:[3]

Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
USMC Rifle Expert badge.png Former USMC Basic Badge.png
1st Row Legion of Merit Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal with one star World War I Victory Medal with two battle clasps Army of Occupation of Germany Medal
2nd Row American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal World War II Victory Medal Haitian Médaille militaire with Diploma

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://bicentennial.norwich.edu/110-0/
  2. ^ "Marine Corps Chevron, Volume 3, Number 9, 4 March 1944". historicperiodicals.princeton.edu. Marine Corps Chevron - Princeton University Library. Retrieved 9 May 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Valor awards for Seth Williams". valor.militarytimes.com. Militarytimes Websites. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  4. ^ Clark, George B. (2008). United States Marine Corps Generals of World War II. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. p. 192. ISBN 978-0-7864-9543-6. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  5. ^ "Find a Grave Memorial". findagrave.com. Find a Grave Memorial Websites. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Marine Corps.
Military offices
Preceded by
Hugh L. Matthews
Quartermaster General of the United States Marine Corps
December 1, 1937 – February 1, 1944
Succeeded by
William P. T. Hill