Severn Street Synagogue

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The Severn Street Synagogue, built in 1813 as a synagogue in Birmingham, England, is now the Athol Masonic Hall. [1]

History[edit]

Severn Street was newly carved out of the former Gooch Estate when the synagogue was built in 1809. [1]

The synagogue was badly damaged in a riot directed at non-Anglicans in 1813 that also severely damaged the Methodist Church in Belmont Row, Quaker Meetinghouse near Lady Well, and the Baptist Chapel in Bond Street.[2]

The synagogue was sold to the Freemasons in 1856 after the construction of the Singers Hill Synagogue.

Architecture[edit]

The synagogue was rebuilt by architect Richard Tutin (1796–1832) in Greek Revival style 1825-1827. The Torah Ark was retained by the Freemasons with only slight modifications. It's handsome, fluted Doric columns and classical entablature remain.[1] The Master's Chair is placed in the former Torah Ark niche.[3]

The adjacent banqueting hall, decorated with Stars of David, was added for the Freemasons by architect Henry Naden in 1871-2.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Birmingham, Andy Foster, George Demidowicz, Yale University Press, 2005, p. 208
  2. ^ Old and new Birmingham: a history of the town and its people, Robert Kirkup Dent, Houghton and Hammond, 1880p. 364
  3. ^ a b Sharman Kadish, Jewish Heritage in England : An Architectural Guide, English Heritage, 2006, pp. 121-2

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 52°28′34″N 1°54′12″W / 52.4762°N 1.9034°W / 52.4762; -1.9034