Sex technology

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Sex technology, also called sextech, is technology and technology-driven ventures that are designed to enhance, innovate and disrupt human sexuality and/or the human sexual experience.[1] The term was originally coined by Cindy Gallop from MLNP and is associated with an advancement of the Digital Revolution from 2010 and its impact on society and culture.

While still nascent, sextech has seen a recent boom in mainstream acceptance due to a big push from female-led firms in the space.[2] Notable individuals include Cindy Gallop (Founder and CEO of MLNP), Polly Rodriguez (Co-founder and CEO of Unbound), Alex Fine and Janet Lieberman (Co-founders of Dame Products), Andrea Barrica (Founder and CEO of O.School), Liz Klinger from (Co-founder and CEO of Lioness), Kate Moyle (Psychosexual & Relationship Therapist at Pillow Play), Stephanie Alys (Co-founder and CPO at MysteryVibe), Dr. Kate Devlin from Goldsmiths University and journalists including Alix Fox, Nichi Hodgson, Rebecca Newman, Gigi Engle, Bryony Cole, Suzannah Weiss, Joseph Seon Kim and GirlOnTheNet.

Sextech entrepreneur Andrea Barrica estimated the market at $30 billion in 2018, with $800 million coming from Amazon sales.[3]

Impact[edit]

  1. Pornography[4]
  2. Pleasure[5]
  3. New kinds of sex[6]
  4. New Ways To Meet Partners[7]
  5. New Kinds Of Partners[8]
  6. New Ways To Coordinate Hook Ups[9]

Advantages[edit]

  1. Possibility of sexual enlightenment[10]
  2. Stronger relationships[11]
  3. Female-friendly[12]
  4. Cure for loneliness[13]
  5. Better sex[14]

Criticism[edit]

  1. Risk of addiction[15]
  2. Cyber-risk[16]
  3. Unnecessary or unlawful collection and use of sensitive personal data[17]
  4. Potential for harm and inequality caused by sex robots[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ (Gallop, 2015 & https://www.hottopics.ht/stories/consumer/what-is-sextech-and-why-is-everyone-ignoring-it/)
  2. ^ Barrica, Andrea (1 November 2018). "How Women Made Sextech The Next Great Frontier for Growth". Forbes.com.
  3. ^ Barrica, Andrea (1 November 2018). "How Women Made Sextech The Next Great Frontier for Growth". Forbes.com.
  4. ^ Smith, Catharine (10 June 2010). "7 Ways Tech Is Changing Sex (PHOTOS)".
  5. ^ Smith, Catharine (10 June 2010). "7 Ways Tech Is Changing Sex (PHOTOS)".
  6. ^ Smith, Catharine (10 June 2010). "7 Ways Tech Is Changing Sex (PHOTOS)".
  7. ^ Smith, Catharine (10 June 2010). "7 Ways Tech Is Changing Sex (PHOTOS)".
  8. ^ Smith, Catharine (10 June 2010). "7 Ways Tech Is Changing Sex (PHOTOS)".
  9. ^ Smith, Catharine (10 June 2010). "7 Ways Tech Is Changing Sex (PHOTOS)".
  10. ^ Krotoski, Aleks (5 February 2011). "What effect has the internet had on our sex lives?" – via The Guardian.
  11. ^ "How tech is taking over your orgasm".
  12. ^ Sollee, Kristen. "7 Awesome Sex Tech Innovations From 2015".
  13. ^ Gurley, George. "Is This the Dawn of the Sexbots? (NSFW)". Vanity Fair.
  14. ^ "Why Sex Is Going To Be Ridiculously Awesome In The Future". Buzzfeed.
  15. ^ Palet, Laura Secorun. "The Future of Sex Tech Looks Awesome/Terrifying".
  16. ^ "How to hack a sex toy: tech firms warn public on growing cyber-risks". 15 March 2017 – via Reuters.
  17. ^ "Sextech: Sticky Legal Issues?".
  18. ^ "About". 12 September 2015.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]