Sexsmith, Alberta

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Sexsmith
Town
Town of Sexsmith
Train station and two of seven elevators that stood in Sexsmith.
Train station and two of seven elevators that stood in Sexsmith.
Nickname(s): 
Grain capital of the British Empire
Location in County of Grande Prairie
Location in County of Grande Prairie
Sexsmith is located in Alberta
Sexsmith
Sexsmith
Location of Sexsmith in Alberta
Coordinates: 55°21′3″N 118°46′57″W / 55.35083°N 118.78250°W / 55.35083; -118.78250Coordinates: 55°21′3″N 118°46′57″W / 55.35083°N 118.78250°W / 55.35083; -118.78250
CountryCanada
ProvinceAlberta
RegionNorthern Alberta
Planning regionUpper Peace
Municipal districtGrande Prairie
Incorporated[1] 
 • VillageApril 12, 1929
 • TownOctober 15, 1979
Government
 • MayorKate Potter
 • Governing bodySexsmith Town Council
Area
 (2016)[2]
 • Land13.24 km2 (5.11 sq mi)
Elevation724 m (2,375 ft)
Population
 (2016)[2]
 • Total2,620
 • Density197.9/km2 (513/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-7 (MST)
Postal code span
Area code(s)+1-780
HighwaysHighway 2
Highway 59
WebsiteOfficial website

Sexsmith is a town in northern Alberta, Canada. It is located on Highway 2, 20 kilometres (12 mi) north of the City of Grande Prairie.

Sexsmith is located in the Peace River Country region of Alberta, one of the most fertile growing areas in the province. The town was once known as the "grain capital of the British Empire": In a 10-year period from 1939 to 1949, it shipped more grain than any other port in the empire.

Demographics[edit]

In the 2016 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Town of Sexsmith recorded a population of 2,620 living in 873 of its 937 total private dwellings, a change of 8.4% from its 2011 population of 2,418. With a land area of 13.24 km2 (5.11 sq mi), it had a population density of 197.9/km2 (512.5/sq mi) in 2016.[2]

In the 2011 Census, the Town of Sexsmith had a population of 2,418 living in 807 of its 848 total dwellings, a change of 22.8% from its 2006 adjusted population of 1,969. With a land area of 13.43 km2 (5.19 sq mi), it had a population density of 180.0/km2 (466.3/sq mi) in 2011.[12]

The population of the Town of Sexsmith according to its 2007 municipal census was 2,255.[13]

Economy[edit]

Encana owns an oil and natural gas liquid processing plant with a total capacity of 115,000 barrels per day, from wells drilled into the Montney Formation.[14]

Sports[edit]

Club League Sport Venue Established Championships
Sexsmith Vipers
NWJHL
Ice Hockey Sexsmith Arena
N/A
0

Sports[edit]

Club League Sport Venue Established Championships
Sexsmith Skating Club NWJHL]] Figure skating Sexsmith Arena
N/A
0

Education[edit]

Sexsmith has three schools:

Sexsmith is also the home of a post-secondary institution:

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Location and History Profile: Town of Sexsmith" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 7, 2016. p. 555. Retrieved October 13, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017.
  3. ^ "Alberta Private Sewage Systems 2009 Standard of Practice Handbook: Appendix A.3 Alberta Design Data (A.3.A. Alberta Climate Design Data by Town)" (PDF) (PDF). Safety Codes Council. January 2012. pp. 212–215 (PDF pages 226–229). Retrieved October 9, 2013.
  4. ^ "Table 5: Population of urban centres, 1916-1946, with guide to locations". Census of the Prairie Provinces, 1946. Volume I: Population. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1949. pp. 397–400.
  5. ^ "Table 6: Population by sex, for census subdivisions, 1956 and 1951". Census of Canada, 1956. Volume I: Population. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1958.
  6. ^ "Table 9: Population by census subdivisions, 1966 by sex, and 1961". 1966 Census of Canada. Western Provinces. Population: Divisions and Subdivisions. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1967.
  7. ^ "Table 3: Population for census divisions and subdivisions, 1971 and 1976". 1976 Census of Canada. Census Divisions and Subdivisions, Western Provinces and the Territories. Population: Geographic Distributions. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1977.
  8. ^ "Table 2: Census Subdivisions in Alphabetical Order, Showing Population Rank, Canada, 1981". 1981 Census of Canada. Census subdivisions in decreasing population order. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1982. ISBN 0-660-51563-6.
  9. ^ "Table 2: Population and Dwelling Counts, for Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions, 1986 and 1991 – 100% Data". 91 Census. Population and Dwelling Counts – Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1992. pp. 100–108. ISBN 0-660-57115-3.
  10. ^ "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, and Census Divisions, 2001 and 1996 Censuses – 100% Data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2019-05-25.
  11. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. January 6, 2010. Retrieved 2019-05-25.
  12. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. 2012-02-08. Retrieved 2012-02-08.
  13. ^ Alberta Municipal Affairs (2009-09-15). "Alberta 2009 Official Population List" (PDF). Retrieved 2010-09-14.
  14. ^ "Encana Corporation (ECA.TO)". Reuters. n.d. Retrieved 23 January 2015.

External links[edit]