Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award

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Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award
Awarded for Significant and innovative contributions in the field of high-performance computing
Country New Jersey, (United States)
Presented by Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Reward(s) US $10,000
First awarded 1999
Last awarded 2015
Official website www.computer.org/web/awards/cray

The Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, also known as the Seymour Cray Award, is an award given by the IEEE Computer Society, to recognize significant and innovative contributions in the field of high-performance computing. The award honors scientists who exhibit the creativity demonstrated by Seymour Cray, founder of Cray Research, Inc., and an early pioneer of supercomputing. Cray was an American electrical engineer and supercomputer architect who designed a series of computers that were the fastest in the world for decades, and founded Cray Research which built many of these machines. Called "the father of supercomputing,"[1] Cray has been credited with creating the supercomputer industry.[2] He played a key role in the invention and design of the UNIVAC 1103, a landmark high-speed computer and the first computer available for commercial use.[3]

In 1972 the IEEE presented Cray with the Harry H. Goode Memorial Award for his contributions to large-scale computer design and the development of multiprocessing systems. One year after Cray's death in 1996, IEEE created the Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award in honor of his creative spirit. [4] The award is one of the 12 technical awards sponsored by the IEEE computer society as recognition given to pioneers in the field of computer science and engineering. [5] The winner receives a crystal memento, certificate, and US$10,000 honorarium.

The first recipient, in 1999, was John Cocke.

Nomination and Ceremony[edit]

The following criteria are considered when selecting a recipient:[6]

Marc Snir receiving his Cray Award in 2013 at the SC Conference
  • Leadership in field
  • Breadth of work
  • Achievement in other fields
  • Inventive value (patents)
  • Individual vs. group contribution
  • Publications (articles, etc.)
  • Originality of contribution
  • Quality of nomination
  • IEEE Society activities and honors
  • Quality of endorsements

The annual nomination deadline is July 1st. Anyone may nominate a candidate, although self-nomination is not allowed.[7][8] A candidate must receive at least three nominations to be considered by the award committee. Nominations should be prepared and submitted through the IEEE official website. [9]

The Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award presentation and reception are held at the SC conference, the international conference for high-performance computing networks, storage, and analysis. The conference is sponsored by the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) and the IEEE Computer Society. It is held annually in mid-November.[10] Several other IEEE sponsored awards are presented at the same event, including the ACM Gordon Bell Prize, the ACM/IEEE-CS Ken Kennedy Award, the ACM/IEEE-CS George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship, the ACM SIGHPC / Intel Computational & Data Science Fellowships, the IEEE-CS Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, and the IEEE-CS Sidney Fernbach Memorial Award.[11]

Recipients[edit]

Year Recipients Country Citation
1999 John Cocke United States "For unique and creative contributions to the computer industry through innovative high performance system designs."[12]
2000 Glen J. Culler[13] United States "For pioneering contributions to the foundation and practice of high performance computing in array and very long instruction word (VLIW) processing especially for use in interactive scientific exploration."[14]
2001 John L. Hennessy[15] United States "For pioneering contributions to the foundation, teaching, and practice of high performance computing, especially in distributed shared memory multiprocessor architectures and in design and application of reduced instruction set architectures."[16]
2002 Monty Denneau United States "For ingenious and sustained contributions to designs and implementations at the frontier of high performance computing leading to widely used industrial products."[17]
2003 Burton J. Smith United States "For ingenious and sustained contributions to designs and implementations at the frontier of high performance computing and especially for sustained championing of the use of multithreading to enable parallel execution and overcome latency and to achieve high performance in industrially significant products."[18][19]
2004 William J. Dally United States "For fundamental contributions to the design and engineering of high-performance interconnection networks, parallel computer architectures, and high-speed signaling technology."[20]
2005 Steven L. Scott United States "For advancing supercomputer architecture through the development of the Cray T3E, the Cray X1 and the Cray Black Widow".[21]
2006 Tadashi Watanabe Japan "For serving as lead designer of the NEC SX series of supercomputers, and especially for the design of the Earth Simulator, which was the world's fastest supercomputer from 2002 to 2004."[22]
2007 Ken Batcher United States "For fundamental theoretical and practical contributions to massively parallel computation, including parallel sorting algorithms, interconnection networks, and pioneering designs of the STARAN and MPP computers."[23]
2008 Steve Wallach United States For his "contribution to high-performance computing through design of innovative vector and parallel computing systems, notably the Convex mini-supercomputer series, a distinguished industrial career and acts of public service."[24]
2009 Kenichi Miura Japan For his "ingenuity in developing supercomputer software and hardware that advanced the state-of-the art in technical computing."[25]
2010 Alan Gara United States For his "innovations in low power, densely packaged supercomputing systems."[26]
2011 Charles L. Seitz United States "For innovations in high-performance message passing architectures and networks."[27]
2012 Peter M. Kogge United States For "innovations in advanced computer architecture and systems."[28]
2013 Marc Snir[29] France For his "contributions to the research, development, theory, and standardization of high-performance parallel computing including the IBM RS/6000 SP and Blue Gene systems."[30]
2014 Gordon Bell United States "For his exceptional contributions in designing and bringing several computer systems to market that changed the world of high performance computing and of computing in general, the two most important of these being the PDP-6 and the VAX-11/780." [31]
2015 Mateo Valero Spain "In recognition of seminal contributions to vector, out-of-order, multithreaded, and VLIW architectures." [32]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Obituary - Seymour Cray, Father of supercomputing". 
  2. ^ "Tribute to Seymour Cray". Retrieved 14 October 2014. 
  3. ^ "Seymour Cray The Supercomputer". Lemelson-MIT Program. Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  4. ^ "History Seymour Cray". Cray Inc.,. Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  5. ^ "IEEE Technical Awards". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 24 April 2016. 
  6. ^ "IEEE Awards Guidelines and Information". Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  7. ^ "Nomination Questions for Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award" (PDF). Retrieved 25 April 2016. 
  8. ^ "IEEE Awards How to Nominate". Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  9. ^ "Seymour Cray Award Nomination". Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  10. ^ "The SC Conference Series". Retrieved 24 April 2016. 
  11. ^ "The SC16 Award Content". Retrieved 25 April 2016. 
  12. ^ "John Cocke: 1999 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  13. ^ "Awards Highlight Most Successful SC Conference Ever SC2001 will build on SC2000 momentum". SC 2001. Nov 15, 2000. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  14. ^ "Glen J. Culler: 2000 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  15. ^ "AWARDS CAP SC2001 HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING AND NETWORKING CONFERENCE". SC 2001. Nov 15, 2001. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  16. ^ "John L. Hennessy: 2001 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  17. ^ "Monty M. Denneau: 2002 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  18. ^ "Burton J. Smith: 2003 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  19. ^ "Cray Inc.'s Burton Smith Honored With Seymour Cray Award". Cray Inc. Nov 23, 2003. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  20. ^ "William J. Dally: 2004 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  21. ^ "Steven L. Scott: 2005 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  22. ^ "Tadashi Watanabe: 2006 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  23. ^ "Kenneth E. Batcher: 2007 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  24. ^ "Steve Wallach: 2008 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  25. ^ "2009 Seymour Cray Award Goes to NII’s Kenichi Miura". Computer.org. 2009-10-15. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  26. ^ "Alan Gara". Computer.org. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  27. ^ "Charles L. Seitz". Computer.org. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  28. ^ "Peter M. Kogge: 2012 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  29. ^ "Parallel computing pioneer Marc Snir to receive 2013 IEEE Seymour Cray Award at SC13". SC 13. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  30. ^ "Marc Snir: 2013 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  31. ^ "Gordon Bell: 2014 Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award Recipient". Retrieved 11 March 2015. 
  32. ^ "Mateo Valero: 2015 Seymour Cray Award Recipient". Retrieved 25 September 2015. 

External links[edit]