Shadow Knights

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Shadow Knights
Shadow Knights Cover art.jpg
Cover art
Developer(s) id Software
Publisher(s) Softdisk
Designer(s) John Carmack
Tom Hall
Programmer(s) John Romero
Platform(s) DOS
Release January 31, 1991[1]
Genre(s) Platform
Mode(s) Single player

Shadow Knights - The Shogun of Death (Also known as "Budo - The Art of Ninja Combat") is a platform game created by id Software and published by Softdisk in 1991. Shadow Knights was first game created for Softdisk, who paid $5000 for it as part of id Software's contractual obligation to them.[2] Shadow Knights was also marketed by Softdisk as part of "The Lost Game Collection of ID Software".[3]

Plot[edit]

A ninja has been trained by the Tokugawa clan to defend their shogun from the Satsuma warriors.

Gameplay[edit]

Shadow Knights is a basic platform game with many element similar to the NES Ninja Gaiden games. The player goes through nine levels, slaying enemies with both sword and magic stars and collecting powerups. The player has limited vitality and magic power to survive. The player can accumulate power by collecting magic orbs. The ninja has healing and weapon powers. Some level areas require the player to defeat a boss monster to progress.

Development[edit]

Development for Shadow Knights was being done in conjunction with Slordax: The Unknown Enemy around 1990. At the time Commander Keen in Invasion of the Vorticons was in development outside working hours with Softdisk.[4] Tom Hall designed a few of the levels.[5] The level maps were designed using a custom-made program called Tile Editor (TEd), which was first created for Dangerous Dave.[6] The game engine that was built would soon be reused for Dangerous Dave in the Haunted Mansion.

References[edit]

  1. ^ temptemp2015 (May 14, 2016). "Shadow Knights: id Software". Internet Archive. Retrieved December 12, 2017. 
  2. ^ John Romero (February 1, 2011). "id Software: 20 Years Old Today!". Squarespace. Retrieved December 12, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Gamer's Edge Electronic Catalog - Volume 1". Softdisk. 1992. Retrieved December 12, 2017. 
  4. ^ John Carmack. "Recollections - 3D Realms". 3D Realms. Retrieved December 12, 2017. 
  5. ^ Tom Hall (2008). "Tom's Games". WordPress. Retrieved December 12, 2017. 
  6. ^ Lightbown, David (2017-02-23). "Classic Tools Retrospective: John Romero talks about creating TEd, the tile editor that shipped over 30 games". Gamasutra. UBM. Retrieved December 12, 2017. 

External links[edit]