Shadowfax (band)

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Shadowfax
Photo by Sam Emerson
Photo by Sam Emerson
Background information
OriginChicago, Illinois, U.S.
Genres
Years active1972–1995
LabelsPassport/ABC
Windham Hill
Capitol
Private Music
Earthbeat!
Sonic Images
Past membersSee "Members"

Shadowfax was a new-age/electronic musical group formed in Chicago in the early 1970s and best known for their albums Shadowfax and Folksongs for a Nuclear Village. In 1989, they won the Grammy for Best New Age Performance for Folksongs for a Nuclear Village.[1] In 1993, they were nominated for the Grammy for Esperanto.

The group formed in 1972[2] and disbanded after 1995 when Lyricon player and leader Chuck Greenberg died of a heart attack. Having lost their signature sound, Shadowfax's members went on to other projects.

The group took its name from Gandalf the Grey's horse Shadowfax in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.

Members[edit]

  • Chuck Greenberglyricon, saxophone, flute (1974-1995)
  • Armen Chakmakian – keyboards (1990-1995)
  • David Lewis – keyboards (1984-1990)
  • G. E. Stinson – guitars (1974-1990)
  • Charlie Bisharat – electric violin (1986-1990)
  • Phil Maggini – double bass, bass guitar, vocals (1974-1995)
  • Stuart Nevitt – drums, percussion (1974-1995)
  • Doug Maluchnik - Acoustic Grand, Baldwin & Rhodes, ARP 2600, Mini Moog, Oberheim, digital sequencer, harpsichord, chamberlin

Additional musicians[edit]

  • Emil Richards – percussion (1982-1992)
  • Ramon Yslas – percussion
  • Andy Abad – guitars
  • Doug Maluchnik – keyboards
  • Jared Stewart – keyboards (1983)
  • Jamii Szmadzinski - electric violin[3] (1983-1986)
  • Jerry Goodman – violin
  • Mark Martinez – bass

Discography[edit]

Notes[edit]

  • Greenberg, Joy (2006) A Pause in the Rain ISBN 1-60145-018-4
  • Larkin, Colin (1995) The Guinness Encyclopedia of Popular Music ISBN 1-56159-176-9
  • Yurochko, Bob (1993) A Short History of Jazz ISBN 0-8304-1595-5

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yurochko (1993) pp. 225-226
  2. ^ Larkin (1995) p.3727
  3. ^ "Bowed Electricity - Electric violin players, makers, and resources". www.bowedelectricity.com. Retrieved 30 March 2018.

External links[edit]