Shaheed Latif

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Shahid Lateef
Born (1913-06-11)June 11, 1913
Chandausi, Uttar Pradesh
Died April 16, 1967(1967-04-16) (aged 53)
Occupation film director, screenwriter, film producer
Years active 1941-1968
Spouse(s) Ismat Chughtai

Shahid Lateef (11 June 1913 - 16 April 1967) was Hindi film director, writer, and producer. He was the maker of films like Ziddi (1948) with launched Dev Anand's career and Arzoo (1950) starring Dilip Kumar and Kamini Kaushal. Noted Urdu poet Kaifi Azmi started his career as a lyricist with his film Buzdil in 1951.

Early life and background[edit]

He was born in Chandausi, Uttar Pradesh and studied at Aligarh Muslim University, here he not just befriended Saadat Hasan Manto,[1] but also Ismat Chughtai (1915–1991), who also went to become a noted Urdu writer. They married in 1941, and later had two daughters.[2]

Career[edit]

Lateef shifted to Bombay (now Mumbai) and started his career with Bombay Talkies, a noted film studio of Hindi film industry, where he wrote dialogues for Ashok Kumar-starrer, Naya Sansar (1941), followed by Amiya Chakravarty's Anjaan (1941) and Gyan Mukherjee's Jhoola (1941). This led to his directorial debut with Ziddi (1948), on a story by Ismat Chughtai. The film also established the career of actor Dev Anand. [3] The husband wife duo worked together on many films, where Ismat was sometimes a scenarist, a writer or at times even producer.

He died in Mumbai, Maharashtra on 16 April 1967.

Filmography[edit]

  • Jawab Ayega (1968) - Director
  • Baharen Phir Bhi Aayengi (1966) - Director
  • Picnic (1966) - Director
  • Sone Ki Chidiya (1958) - Director
  • Society (1955) - Director
  • Darwaza (1954) - Director
  • Faraib (1953) - Director
  • Sheesha (1952) - Director
  • Buzdil (1951) - Director
  • Arzoo (1950) - Director
  • Shikayat (1948) - Director
  • Ziddi (1948) - Director
  • Anjaan (1941) - Dialogue
  • Jhoola (1941) - Screenwriter, Dialogue
  • Naya Sansar (1941) - Dialogue

References[edit]

  1. ^ Saadat Hasan Manto (2012). Stars from Another Sky: The Bombay Film World of The 1940s. Penguin Books, Limited. ISBN 978-0-14-341536-7. 
  2. ^ Abida Samiuddin (2007). Encyclopaedic Dictionary Of Urdu Literature (2 Vols. Set). Global Vision Publishing Ho. p. 132. ISBN 978-81-8220-191-0. Retrieved 24 June 2013. 
  3. ^ Bhaichand Patel (2012). Bollywood's Top 20: Superstars of Indian Cinema. Penguin Books India. p. 103. ISBN 978-0-670-08572-9. 

External links[edit]