Shai Gilgeous-Alexander

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Shai Gilgeous-Alexander
Shai Gilgeous-Alexander 2 (cropped).jpg
No. 2 – Los Angeles Clippers
PositionPoint guard
LeagueNBA
Personal information
Born (1998-07-12) July 12, 1998 (age 20)
Toronto, Ontario
NationalityCanadian
Listed height6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Listed weight180 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High school
CollegeKentucky (2017–2018)
NBA draft2018 / Round: 1 / Pick: 11th overall
Selected by the Charlotte Hornets
Playing career2018–present
Career history
2018–presentLos Angeles Clippers
Career highlights and awards

Shaivonte Aician Gilgeous-Alexander (born July 12, 1998) is a Canadian professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Clippers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for the Kentucky Wildcats.

Early life[edit]

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander was born on July 12, 1998 in Toronto, Ontario.[1] His mother, Charmaine Gilgeous, is a former track star who competed for Antigua and Barbuda at the 1992 Summer Olympics.[2] His father, Vaughn Alexander, coached him as a youth.[3] He began high school in Hamilton, Ontario at St. Thomas More Catholic Secondary School before switching to Sir Allan MacNab Secondary School, then transferred to Hamilton Heights Christian Academy (located in Chattanooga, Tennessee) for his junior and senior years to improve his basketball skills, graduating in 2017.[4][5] His cousin is Virginia Tech player Nickeil Alexander-Walker.[6]

High school career[edit]

Growing up in Hamilton, he did not make the St. Thomas More junior team in grade 9 and subsequently played on the school's midget squad. He ended up winning team MVP and the midget boys' city championship.[7] He then attended Sir Allan MacNab Secondary School before heading to Hamilton Heights Christian Academy in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 2015.[8] "I just thought I needed to play better competition ...," he said. As a senior, Gilgeous-Alexander averaged 18.4 points, 4.4 rebounds and 4.0 assists.[9]

In early 2016, he participated in the Basketball Without Borders Camp.[10]

A four-star recruit (by ESPN), Gilgeous-Alexander originally committed to Florida, but re-opened his recruitment in October 2016.[11] His final five schools were Kentucky, Kansas, Syracuse, Texas and UNLV.[12] The following month, he announced his decision to play college basketball at Kentucky.[13] At the 2017 Nike Hoop Summit, he poured in eleven points in 21:24 minutes of action, representing the World Select Team.[14]

College career[edit]

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander started the 2017-18 season as a reserve, sitting behind freshman point guard Quade Green, but still averaged over 30 minutes per game. After a tough loss to UCLA, Alexander erupted against Louisville in December, scoring 24 points, grabbing 5 rebounds, dishing out 4 assists, and securing 3 steals.[15] When he first stepped on the University of Kentucky's campus, Gilgeous-Alexander had long hair. However, he cut his hair early in the season and some say this started his progression from sixth man to starting point guard.[16] He continued to lead the team for the following two games against Georgia and LSU, scoring 21 points against Georgia and 18 against LSU. He was a consistent contributor to a "struggling" UK team that had a four game losing streak during the season. He became a starter along with four other freshmen: Hamidou Diallo, Nick Richards, Kevin Knox, and P. J. Washington. Despite their losses, his PPG shot up to 12.9 along with 3.8 rebounds and 4.6 assists. Gilgeous-Alexander had a great SEC tournament and continued that momentum into the NCAA Tournament. After playing great basketball in the first two rounds against Davidson and Buffalo, the magic ran out and Kentucky lost to Kansas State in the Sweet 16. Gilgeous-Alexander's final college basketball moment was a missed three-point attempt at the buzzer. On April 9, 2018, he declared for the 2018 NBA Draft.[17]

Professional career[edit]

On June 21, 2018, Gilgeous-Alexander was selected with the eleventh overall pick by the Charlotte Hornets in the 2018 NBA draft, before being traded to the Los Angeles Clippers the same day.[18]

On December 17, 2018, Gilgeous-Alexander scored a season-best of 24 points in a 127–131 loss to the Portland Trail Blazers.[19] On January 18, 2019, Gilgeous-Alexander tied his season-best of 24 points in a 94–112 loss to the Golden State Warriors.[20] Eleven days later, he was named a member of the World Team for the 2019 Rising Stars Challenge.[21]

International career[edit]

He played for Canada’s Junior National Team that competed in the 2016 FIBA Americas Under-18 Championship in Valdivia, Chile, averaging 7.8 points, 5.4 assists, 4.0 rebounds a contest en route to winning silver.[22]

Career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

College[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2017–18 Kentucky 37 24 33.7 .485 .404 .817 4.1 5.1 1.6 .5 14.4

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Shai Gilgeous-Alexander profile, FIBA Americas U18 Championship for Men 2016 | FIBA.COM". FIBA.COM. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  2. ^ "Hamilton point guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander a top prospect in NBA draft | CBC News". CBC. Retrieved June 21, 2018.
  3. ^ "Competitive cousins shared a room in high school. UK-Virginia Tech game pits them against each other". kentucky. Retrieved March 17, 2018.
  4. ^ "Wiedmer: Hamilton Heights coach hopes to see former player Shai Gilgeous-Alexander become NBA lottery pick". Chattanooga Times Free Press. Retrieved June 21, 2018.
  5. ^ "Former Hamilton Heights player now a star at Kentucky". Chattanooga Times Free Press. Retrieved June 21, 2018.
  6. ^ Johnson, Chris (November 21, 2017). "The Sleeper Emerging as One of the 2018 NBA Draft's Best Guards". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved September 7, 2018.
  7. ^ Radley, Scott (June 20, 2018). "Hamilton's Shai Gilgeous-Alexander about to star on NBA stage". TheSpec.com. Retrieved June 21, 2018.
  8. ^ "BasketballRecruiting.Rivals.com - Alexander to Florida". November 27, 2015. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  9. ^ After many forks in the road, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander found a basketball home at UK. (n.d.). Lexington Herald-Leader, p. 1B. Retrieved from http://www.kentucky.com/sports/college/kentucky-sports/uk-basketball-men/article177166321.html
  10. ^ "Kentucky Offers Shai Alexander After Reopening Recruitment". Northpolehoops.com. November 1, 2016. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  11. ^ "Ex-Florida commit Alexander picks Kentucky". ESPN.com. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  12. ^ After many forks in the road, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander found a basketball home at UK. (n.d.). Lexington Herald-Leader, p. 1B. Retrieved from http://www.kentucky.com/sports/college/kentucky-sports/uk-basketball-men/article177166321.html
  13. ^ "Ex-Florida commit Alexander picks Kentucky". ESPN.com. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  14. ^ "Nike Hoop Summit". Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  15. ^ "Shai Gilgeous-Alexander". ESPN.com. Retrieved February 15, 2018.
  16. ^ Tucker, Kyle. "Kentucky basketball: Shai Gilgeous-Alexander cuts his hair, then carves up Louisville". SEC Country. Retrieved February 15, 2018.
  17. ^ Givony, Jonathan (April 9, 2018). "Kentucky freshman guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander to enter draft". ESPN. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  18. ^ "19-year-old Canadian goes 11th in NBA draft | CBC Sports". CBC. Retrieved June 22, 2018.
  19. ^ "Portland Trail Blazers vs LA Clippers - Box Score - December 17, 2018 - ESPN". ESPN.com. January 22, 2019. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  20. ^ "Golden State Warriors vs LA Clippers - Box Score - January 18, 2019 - ESPN". ESPN.com. January 22, 2019. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  21. ^ https://www.nba.com/article/2019/01/29/2019-mtn-dew-ice-rising-stars-roster-official-release
  22. ^ "Shai Gilgeous-Alexander profile, FIBA Americas U18 Championship for Men 2016 | FIBA.COM". FIBA.COM. Retrieved July 10, 2017.

External links[edit]