Salman Ebrahim Mohamed Ali Al Khalifa

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Salman Ebrahim Mohamed Ali Al Khalifa
Born (1979-07-24) July 24, 1979 (age 41)
Rifah, Bahrain
Detained atGuantanamo
ISN246
Charge(s)no charge extrajudicial detention
Statusrepatriated
OccupationShaikh

Salman Ebrahim Mohamed Ali Al Khalifa is a citizen of Bahrain who was held in extrajudicial detention in the United States Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.[1] The Department of Defense reports that Al Khalifa was born on July 24, 1979, in Rifah, Bahrain. He is a member of the Al Khalifa royal family of Bahrain, related to the king of Bahrain.

Al Khalifa is a second cousin of the King of Bahrain.[2]

Al Khalifa, like the other Bahrainis held in Guantanamo, has Joshua Colangelo-Bryan as his lawyer.

Official status reviews[edit]

Initially the Bush Presidency asserted that the Geneva Conventions did not apply to any captives apprehended in the "war on terror", and that these individuals could be held indefinitely without any open review of their status. However, in 2004, in Rasul v. Bush the United States Supreme Court ruled the captives had to be given an opportunity to hear the justifications for their detention, and an opportunity to try to refute those allegations.

Office for the Administrative Review of Detained Enemy Combatants[edit]

Following the Supreme Court's ruling in Rasul v. Bush, the Department of Defense set up the Office for the Administrative Review of Detained Enemy Combatants, which conducted annual reviews, which were, in theory, open to members of the press. Al Khalifa's status was reviewed in 2004 and 2005.[3]

Formerly secret Joint Task Force Guantanamo assessment[edit]

On April 25, 2011, whistleblower organization WikiLeaks published formerly secret assessments drafted by Joint Task Force Guantanamo analysts.[4][5][6] His assessment was five pages long, and was drafted on May 13, 2005.[7] Camp commandant Jay W. Hood recommended his "transfer to the control of another country for continued detention."

Release[edit]

The Gulf Daily News announced on November 5, 2005, that Salman had been released, and was one of three Bahraini detainees on their way home.[8][9]

On Thursday August 23, 2007, the Gulf Daily News reported that Bahraini Member of Parliament Mohammed Khalid had called for the Bahrain government to provide financial compensation to the released men.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ OARDEC (May 15, 2006). "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 29, 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-29.
  2. ^ Nathan Fuller (2011-05-06). "Detention & Deception". The Perspective. Archived from the original on 2011-12-01. Retrieved 2012-08-07. For example, Sheikh Salman Al Khalifa, a member of the Bahraini royal family, was detained specifically to provide information on a select few "personalities" and alleged "Taliban safehouses," but was then deemed himself a potential "threat to the US, its interests and allies."
  3. ^ Margot Williams (2008-11-03). "Guantanamo Docket: Sheikh Salman Ebrahim Mohamed Ali al Khalifa". New York Times. Archived from the original on 2012-09-21. Retrieved October 2010. Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  4. ^ Christopher Hope; Robert Winnett; Holly Watt; Heidi Blake (2011-04-27). "WikiLeaks: Guantanamo Bay terrorist secrets revealed -- Guantanamo Bay has been used to incarcerate dozens of terrorists who have admitted plotting terrifying attacks against the West – while imprisoning more than 150 totally innocent people, top-secret files disclose". The Telegraph (UK). Archived from the original on 2012-07-13. Retrieved 2012-07-13. The Daily Telegraph, along with other newspapers including The Washington Post, today exposes America's own analysis of almost ten years of controversial interrogations on the world's most dangerous terrorists. This newspaper has been shown thousands of pages of top-secret files obtained by the WikiLeaks website.
  5. ^ "WikiLeaks: The Guantánamo files database". The Telegraph (UK). 2011-04-27. Archived from the original on 2015-06-26. Retrieved 2012-07-10.
  6. ^ "Guantanamo Bay detainee file on Sheikh Salman Ebrahim Mohamed Ali Al Khalifa, US9BA-000246DP, passed to the Telegraph by Wikileaks". The Telegraph (UK). 2011-04-27. Archived from the original on 2013-07-08. Retrieved 2012-08-07. Transfer to the control of another country for continued detention
  7. ^ Jay W. Hood (2005-05-13). "Recommendation for Transfer out of DoD Control (TRO) for Guantanamo Detainee, ISN US9AG" (PDF). Joint Task Force Guantanamo. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-04-17. Retrieved 2012-08-07. Media related to File:ISN 00246, Sulieman Al Khalifa's Guantanamo detainee assessment.pdf at Wikimedia Commons
  8. ^ Kanwal Hameed (November 5, 2005). "Free at last!". Gulf Daily News. Archived from the original on June 15, 2008. Retrieved 2007-07-11.
  9. ^ "'Nightmare' for freed Bay Three". Gulf Daily News. November 9, 2005. Archived from the original on June 15, 2008. Retrieved 2007-07-11.
  10. ^ Geoffrey Bew (August 23, 2007). "Bay victims may get BD50,000". Gulf Daily News. Archived from the original on October 31, 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-23.

External links[edit]