Shakespearean comedy

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The Duel Scene from 'Twelfth Night' by William Shakespeare, William Powell Frith (1842)

In the First Folio, the plays of William Shakespeare were grouped into three categories: comedies, histories, and tragedies;[1] and modern scholars recognize a fourth category, romance, to describe the specific types of comedy that appear in Shakespeare's later works.[2]

Plays[edit]

This alphabetical list includes everything listed as a comedy in the First Folio of 1623, in addition to the two quarto plays (The Two Noble Kinsmen and Pericles, Prince of Tyre) which are not included in the Folio but generally recognised to be Shakespeare's own. Plays marked with an asterisk (*) are now commonly referred to as the romances. Plays marked with two asterisks (**) are sometimes referred to as the problem plays.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wells 2011, p. 105.
  2. ^ O'Connell 2006, p. 215.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bates, Catherine (2006). "Love and Courtship". In Leggatt, Alexander (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Shakespearean Comedy. Cambridge Companions to Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 102–122. doi:10.1017/CCOL0521770440.007. ISBN 978-0511998577 – via Cambridge Core.
  • O'Connell, Michael (2006). "The Experiment of Romance". In Leggatt, Alexander (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Shakespearean Comedy. Cambridge Companions to Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 215–229. doi:10.1017/CCOL0521770440.013. ISBN 978-0511998577 – via Cambridge Core.
  • Wells, Stanley (2011). "Shakespeare's Comedies". In de Grazia, Margreta; Wells, Stanley (eds.). The New Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare. Cambridge Companions to Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 105–120. ISBN 978-1139002868 – via Cambridge Core.