Shelby, North Carolina

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Shelby, North Carolina
City
Old Cleveland County Courthouse 2009.JPG
Location of Shelby, North Carolina
Location of Shelby, North Carolina
Coordinates: 35°17′18″N 81°32′16″W / 35.28833°N 81.53778°W / 35.28833; -81.53778Coordinates: 35°17′18″N 81°32′16″W / 35.28833°N 81.53778°W / 35.28833; -81.53778
Country United States
State North Carolina
County Cleveland
Area
 • Total 21.1 sq mi (54.7 km2)
 • Land 21.1 sq mi (54.6 km2)
 • Water 0.04 sq mi (0.1 km2)
Elevation 869 ft (265 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 20,323
 • Density 960/sq mi (370/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 28150-28152
Area code 704
FIPS code 37-61200 [1]
GNIS feature ID 0994631 [2]
Website cityofshelby.com

Shelby is a city in and the county seat of Cleveland County, North Carolina, United States and forms the western edge of the Charlotte combined statistical area.[3] The population was 20,323 at the 2010 census.[4]

History[edit]

The Banker's House, Joshua Beam House, Central Shelby Historic District, Cleveland County Courthouse, East Marion-Belvedere Park Historic District, James Heyward Hull House, Masonic Temple Building, Dr. Victor McBrayer House, George Sperling House and Outbuildings, Joseph Suttle House, Webbley, and West Warren Street Historic District are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[5]

The city gained some international attention when it became the site of the arrest of the suspected Charleston church shooting's perpetrator, Dylann Roof, in June 2015.

Geography[edit]

Shelby is located in south-central Cleveland County at 35°17′18″N 81°32′16″W / 35.28833°N 81.53778°W / 35.28833; -81.53778 (35.288272, -81.537787).[6] U.S. 74, a four-lane highway, runs through the city south of the center, and leads east 21 miles (34 km) to Gastonia and west 27 miles (43 km) to Rutherfordton.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 21.1 square miles (54.7 km2), of which 21.1 square miles (54.6 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km2), or 0.17%, is water.[4]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 990
1890 1,394 40.8%
1900 1,874 34.4%
1910 3,127 66.9%
1920 3,609 15.4%
1930 10,789 198.9%
1940 14,037 30.1%
1950 15,508 10.5%
1960 17,698 14.1%
1970 16,328 −7.7%
1980 15,310 −6.2%
1990 14,669 −4.2%
2000 19,477 32.8%
2010 20,323 4.3%
Est. 2014 20,276 [7] −0.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 19,477 people, 7,927 households, and 5,144 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,073.8 people per square mile (414.6/km²). There were 8,853 housing units at an average density of 488.1/sq mi (188.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 56.88% White, 40.97% African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.72% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.56% of the population.

There were 7,927 households out of which 27.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.3% were married couples living together, 20.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.1% were non-families. 31.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.0% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 19.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 83.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 75.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,345, and the median income for a family was $38,603. Males had a median income of $30,038 versus $21,362 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,708. About 14.3% of families and 17.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.7% of those under age 18 and 13.7% of those age 65 or over.

Annual events[edit]

The Cleveland County Fair in 2010
  • Cleveland County Fair - Since 1924, the Cleveland County Fair has been home to what has become North Carolina’s largest agricultural fair and a highlight of traditional activities held annually in Cleveland County. Over 165,000 patrons visit each year's Cleveland County Fair. While known primarily for this event, the fairgrounds also host a wide variety of other events throughout the year.
  • The Livermush Expo began in 1987 to celebrate the unique delicacy. In that year the Cleveland County Commissioners and the Shelby City Council passed resolutions proclaiming that "livermush is the most delicious, most economical and most versatile of meats."
  • Alive After Five Outdoor Concerts- Live music on the court square, presented by the Uptown Shelby Association and its community partners. Food and beverage vendors on site, Uptown restaurants open late for dinner.
  • American Legion World Series - Between 2011 and 2019 Shelby will play host to the American Legion World Series with a view to becoming the permanent home of the tournament. Barring any major problems, the National Office of the American Legion has agreed to extend Shelby's contract for two additional five-year terms, making Keeter Stadium and Shelby High School home to the ALWS until 2029.[9] In order to host the event Shelby High School's Hoyt S. Keeter Stadium underwent an extensive renovation and expansion to 5,500-capacity.
  • The Foothill's Merry Go Round Festival is held annually the last weekend of every April at Shelby City Park. The event began in 1998 and features awesome amusement rides, live entertainment, and fireworks.[10]
  • The Shelby Hamfest sponsored by the Shelby Amateur Radio Club. Held annually at the Cleveland County Fairgrounds.[11]

Attractions[edit]

The Don Gibson Theater in Uptown Shelby is named for country musician and Shelby native Don Gibson (see notable people section below). The theater occupies a former movie theater that has been converted to a venue for live music performances[12]

The City of Shelby Parks and Recreation Department has something for all to enjoy and has for over 60 years. City Park spans 150 acres with beautifully kept ball fields, playgrounds, picnic areas, an aquatics center, a nine hole golf course, miles of paved walking trails, horseshoe pits, and a sitting garden. There is also a Community Center with a 1,500 seat gymnasium with a stage. In addition City Park is home to the Historic Herchell Spillman Carousel and Gift Shop and restored Rotary Miniature Train. Over 800,000 people visit Shelby City Park annually.[13]

The Earl Scruggs Center: Music and Stories from the American South opened on Jan 11, 2014. This high tech museum honors banjo innovator and legend Earl Scruggs.

In popular culture[edit]

The film adaptation of Blood Done Sign My Name was filmed in Shelby,[14] as well as the reaping scene in the film adaptation of The Hunger Games.[15]

A fictionalized version of the city is the setting of HBO comedy show Eastbound & Down. Filmed in Wilmington, North Carolina, it bears little geographic or cultural resemblance to the real place. Actor and writer Danny McBride chose the location as an inspiration because of its size, attitude, and name.[16]

In the 10th episode of the TV show Make It or Break It, Shelby is mentioned as being the location of Lauren Tanner's mother.

On the 41st episode of the TV show Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern, the host travels to the annual Livermush festival in Shelby.[17]

On November 11, 2007, the Oxygen Network's "Captured" aired a profile of The Brenda Sue Brown Murder mystery that took place in Shelby, North Carolina in 1966.[18]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Shelby city, North Carolina". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved December 31, 2014. 
  5. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  9. ^ "American Legion World Series". The American Legion World Series. Retrieved 12 August 2015. 
  10. ^ "Parks and Recreation: Festival Information". City of Shelby, NC. Retrieved 2 April 2012. 
  11. ^ url=http://www.shelbyhamfest.org
  12. ^ http://www.dongibsontheater.com/
  13. ^ http://www.cityofshelby.com/govt/dept_parks_rec/index.php
  14. ^ "Tyson's 'Blood' to be filmed in N.C.". Raleigh News & Observer. February 13, 2008. 
  15. ^ Buckworth, Kathy (14 March 2012). "The Hunger Games Take Over North Carolina". Huffington Post. Retrieved 28 July 2012. 
  16. ^ Cawthon, Graham (February 28, 2009). "How HBO's "Eastbound & Down" came to Shelby". The Star. Retrieved 14 July 2009. 
  17. ^ Allen, David (May 7, 2009). "Livermush (and Shelby) featured on Travel Channel". The Shelby Star. Retrieved 3 January 2010. 
  18. ^ http://www.shelbystar.com/news/cases-28870-years-case.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  19. ^ "Bill Champion's career statistics". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 29 March 2009. 
  20. ^ "About Kay Hagan". United States Senate. Retrieved 12 May 2009. 
  21. ^ "Tom Wright's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrieved 8 September 2008. 

External links[edit]