Shelley Hull

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Shelley Hull
Shelley Hull.jpg
Born
Shelley Vaughan Hull

(1884-06-17)June 17, 1884
DiedJanuary 14, 1919(1919-01-14) (aged 34)
Cause of deathInfluenza
Resting placeNewton Cemetery and Crematory, Newton, Massachusetts
Other namesShelley Hull
OccupationActor
Years active1903-1919
Spouse(s)
RelativesHenry Hull (brother)
Margaret Anglin (sister-in-law)

Shelley Vaughan Hull (June 17, 1884 - January 14, 1919) was an American stage actor who appeared in two motion pictures. His Broadway popularity as a suave handsome leading man was continually on the rise until his death at age 34 in the Influenza Pandemic of 1918. He was married to actress Josephine Hull. Shelley was a particular favorite of the young Billie Burke and costarred with her in several plays. He had two brothers involved in the theater and films, Howard Hull, who was married to Margaret Anglin, and younger brother Henry Hull, who became a well known actor on stage and in film.[1][2]

Hull is buried in Newton, Massachusetts.[3]

Broadway plays[edit]

Billie Burke and Shelley Hull in The Land of Promise
  • Sweet Kitty Bellairs (1903)
  • The Crossing (1906)
  • The Bridge (1909)
  • Electricity (1910)
  • The Foolish Virgin (1910)
  • Seven Sisters (1911) (with Laurette Taylor)
  • Lady Patricia (1912) (with Mrs. Fiske)
  • Chains (1912)
  • The Amazons (1913) (with Billie Burke)
  • The Land of Promise (1913) (with Billie Burke) (*filmed by Burke and Thomas Meighan in 1917 as The Land of Promise and again by Meighan in 1926 as The Canadian)
  • Jerry (1914) (with Billie Burke)
  • The Cinderella Man (1916)
  • The Willow Tree (1917) (with Fay Bainter)
  • The Lassoo (1917)
  • Why Marry? (1917)
  • Laurette Taylor in Scenes from Shakespeare (1918) (as Petruchio)
  • Under Orders (1918)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Who Was Who in the Theatre 1912-1976, a compilation of annual editions published by John Parker, this 1976 edition published by Gale Research
  2. ^ Who Was Who on the Screen by Evelyn Mack Truitt, c.1983, 3rd edition
  3. ^ Find a Grave

External links[edit]