Shelly Lares

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Shelly Lares
Birth name Michelle Yvette Lares
Born (1971-11-13) November 13, 1971 (age 44)
San Antonio, Texas, United States
Origin San Antonio, Texas, United States
Genres Tejano, Country
Occupation(s) Guitarist, vocalist, songwriter
Instruments Guitar, percussion, vocals
Years active 1986-present
Labels Shell Shock Records 3
Associated acts Elida Reyna, Stefani Montiel, Las 3 Divas, Selena, Chris Perez
Website http://www.shellylaresmusic.com/

Michelle Yvette Lares (born November 13, 1971), best known as Shelly Lares, is an American singer-songwriter, guitarist and percussionist. Starting in 1984, Lares was nominated for Female Vocalist of the Year for thirteen consecutive years and won several other awards at the Tejano Music Awards throughout her career. She signed a recording contract with Manny Records in 1986. She left the label in 1996, and signed with Sony Music Latin until she was dropped in the late 1990s. In 2006, she signed a recording contract with Tejas Records.

Lares is known for her "talent and charismatic stage presence and strong voice." according to AllMusic.[1] Lares also writes all her songs that are featured on her albums. In 1988, Chris Perez joined her band and subsequently left the following year in favor of Selena y Los Dinos. Her 1994 album, Quiero Ser Tu Amante (1994), peaked at number 39 on the US Billboard Top Latin Albums chart.[1] Her self-titled album, Shelly (1996), peaked at number 35 on the Top Latin Albums chart. The lead single from her album, "Siempre Lo Esperare", peaked at number 30 on the Hot Latin Tracks chart and number 18 on the Regional Mexican Songs chart. Her other single, "No Me Olvides", peaked at number 40 on the Hot Latin Tracks chart in 2000.[1]

Career[edit]

Shelly Lares was born on November 13, 1971 in San Antonio, Texas.[2] Shelly and her cousin Tony Lares, formed the group "The New Generation Band" in 1985. The following year, Tony asked Chris Perez to join their group as their lead guitarist. Tony left in 1987, and Perez and Shelly renamed their band the "Shelly Lares Band". The following year, Perez left the band in favor of playing with Selena y Los Dinos.[3] Lares was nominated for a Tejano Music Award for Best Female Vocalist of the Year. In 1996, Lares signed a recording contract with Sony Music Latin in hopes of a crossover into country music.[4]

In 1996, Shelly released her self-titled album which included duets with country singer Vince Gill. By 2000, Shelly Lares became the most popular female Tejano singer.[5] In 2005, Shelly Lares won Female Vocalist of the Year and Entertainer of the Year at the Tejano Music Awards.[6]

Her single, "Siempre Lo Esperare", peaked at number 30 on the US Billboard Hot Latin Tracks chart.[7] Her other single, "No Me Olvides", peaked at number 40 on the Regional Mexican Songs chart.[8] Her album, Quiero Ser Tu Amante, peaked at number 39 on the Top Latin Albums chart.[9]

Discography[edit]

  • Tu Solo Tu (1989)
  • Dynamite (1990)
  • Sabes Que Si (1991)
  • Tejano Star (1992)
  • Apaga La Luz (1993)
  • Quiero Ser Tu Amante (1994)
  • Shelly (1996)
  • Aqui Me Encuentro (1997)
  • Donde Hay Fuego (1998)
  • Mil Besos (2000)
  • 3 Veces (2002)
  • Encore (2003)
  • Sigue Mi Camino (2004)
  • Reflejo (2007)
  • Mirando Adelante (2010)
  • Renacer (2012)
  • De Mi Corazon (2013)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Shelly Lares Biography". AllMusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Hartman, Gary (2008). The history of Texas music (1st ed.). College Station: Texas A & M University Press. ISBN 160344002X. 
  3. ^ Perez, Chris (2012). To Selena, With Love. Penguin Books. ISBN 1101580267. 
  4. ^ San Miguel, Guadalupe (2002). Tejano proud: Tex-Mex music in the twentieth century. Texas A&M University Press. ISBN 1585441880. 
  5. ^ Koster, Rick (2000). Texas music (1st St. Martin's Griffin ed.). New York: St. Martin's Griffin. ISBN 0312254253. 
  6. ^ Cobo, Leila (2 April 2005). "Salsa Songs to Ring Cells". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 117 (14). Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  7. ^ "Shelly Lares > Hot Latin Tracks". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  8. ^ "Shelly Lares > Regional Mexican Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  9. ^ "Shelly Lares > Top Latin Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 

External links[edit]