Shen Yi-ming

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Shen Yi-ming
沈一鳴
General Shen Yi-ming 空軍司令沈一鳴上將.png
Gen. Shen Yi-ming in uniform
27th Chief of the General Staff of the Republic of China Armed Forces
In office
1 July 2019 – 2 January 2020
Preceded byLee Hsi-ming
Succeeded byLiu Chih-pin (acting)
Huang Shu-kuang
12th Deputy Minister (Policy) of National Defense of the Republic of China
In office
1 March 2018 – 30 June 2019
Serving with Chang Guan-chung
MinisterYen Teh-fa
Preceded byPu Tze-chun
Succeeded byChang Che-ping
6th Commander of the Republic of China Air Force
In office
30 January 2015 – 28 February 2018
Preceded byLiu Chen-wu
Succeeded byChang Che-ping
Personal details
Born(1957-03-30)30 March 1957
Shilin, Taipei, Taiwan
Died2 January 2020(2020-01-02) (aged 62)
Wulai, New Taipei, Taiwan
Cause of deathHelicopter accident
Alma materRepublic of China Air Force Academy
Air War College
Military service
Allegiance Republic of China
Branch/service Republic of China Air Force
Years of service1979–2020
RankGeneral Senior General
UnitChief of the General Staff
Commanding General of the Air Force
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese沈一鸣

Shen Yi-ming (Chinese: 沈一鳴; Wade–Giles: Shen I-ming; 30 March 1957 – 2 January 2020) was a Taiwanese Air Force general who served as the Chief of the General Staff, Deputy Minister of National Defense for Policy, and Commander of the ROC Air Force. He gained his master degree of strategic studies in the U.S. Air War College. He was sent as the military instructor in North Yemen for years while he was still a major due to a secret diplomatic mission which is known as the "Great Desert Task Force". After leaving North Yemen, he was then sent to France for years as the Chief Test Pilot and the Chief Seeded Instructor of the squad that was responsible for the delivery of Mirage-2000 over the French Air Force to Taiwanese Air Force with great contribution while he was a lieutenant colonel. Among his military career, he has experienced many foreign missions of the ROC Air Force, which made him later became the Chief of the General Staff with the most right causes. He had put his best efforts on and involved in collaborating the U.S.'s Indo-Pacific strategy actively since he succeeded as the Chief of the General Staff. On 2 January 2020, he was killed during the crash of a military helicopter on a routine mission.

Education[edit]

Shen graduated from the Republic of China Air Force Academy in 1979, his general officer classmate included General Wu Wan-chiao (吳萬教) and Lieutenant General Ko Wen-an (柯文安). He graduated from the Air Command and Staff College in 1992 and from the Air War College in the United States in 2002.[1]

Military background[edit]

He trained in Saudi Arabia for one year as part of the Peace Bell Program (known as Great Desert Program in Taiwan), active between 1979 and 1990.[2] After the Republic of China Air Force acquired Mirage 2000-5 jets from France in the 1990s, he was one of the first Taiwanese pilots to be trained in their operation.[1] Shen held positions in the Air Force such as the Deputy Commander of the Office of the Deputy Joint Chief of the General Staff in Intelligence, Air Force Combatant Command, Deputy Chief of the Air Force Staff, Deputy Minister of National Defense for Administrative Affairs, and served as Commanding General of the Air Force from 1 February 2015 to 1 March 2018.[3]

Deputy Defense Minister and Chief of the General Staff[edit]

Shen succeeded Admiral Pu Tze-chun as vice minister of defense for policy in March 2018, serving under Yen Teh-fa.[4] As vice defense minister, Shen promoted international military exchanges with the United States. In regards to United States President Donald Trump, he has stated “We greatly appreciate that the US is willing to review our military sales requests on a case-by-case basis, instead of the bundling approach carried out previously", referring to military exchanges between the US and Taiwan.[5] Shortly after that comment, Taiwan signed a US$330 million deal to upgrade 144 F-16 fighter jets to the F-16V standard.[6] In July 2019, Shen replaced Admiral Lee Hsi-ming as Chief of the General Staff of the Republic of China Armed Forces.[7]

Death[edit]

Shen was killed in a helicopter accident on 2 January 2020 in the Wulai District of New Taipei.[8] The Black Hawk Shen was traveling in lost contact with Songshan military airbase at 8:07 AM, thirteen minutes after taking off.[9] The helicopter was carrying three crew, nine officers—including Shen—and a correspondent from the Military News Agency. Seven others of those aboard the helicopter were also killed in the crash, including two Major Generals, while five others were injured and survived.[10] Shen's remains were cremated on 14 January 2020, and buried at Wuzhi Mountain Military Cemetery.[11][12] A memorial ceremony for the crash victims was held at Songshan Air Force Base on 14 January 2020.[13]

Shen was posthumously awarded the Order of Blue Sky and White Sun with Grand Cordon, and promoted to Senior General.[14] The Ministry of National Defense awarded Shen a National Emblem Medal.[15]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Tu, Aaron; Chung, Jake (3 January 2020). "Shen known for his pilot, leadership skills". Taipei Times. Retrieved 3 January 2020.
  2. ^ Wang, Yang-yu; Yu, Kai-hsiang; Lee, Hsin-Yin (3 January 2020). "Late chief of general staff remembered for professionalism, modesty". Central News Agency. Retrieved 3 January 2020.
  3. ^ "General Shen Yi-Ming, the 22nd Commander of the Air Force (term of office: February 1, 2015 to March 1, 2018)". air.mnd.gov.tw.
  4. ^ Lu, Hsin-hui; Yen, Wiliam (23 February 2018). "Defense Ministry gets new deputy chief". Central News Agency. Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  5. ^ Chung, Lawrence (29 October 2018). "US, Taiwan military ties closer than ever as Donald Trump challenges Beijing". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  6. ^ Lo, Kinling (26 October 2018). "Taiwan to get upgraded F-16V fighter jets after US arms sale approved". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  7. ^ Yu, Matt; Chung, Yu-chen (1 July 2019). "Taiwan's new chief of military staff takes office". Central News Agency. Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  8. ^ Everington, Keoni (2 January 2020). "Breaking News: Taiwan's Chief of General Staff among 8 dead in Black Hawk crash". Taiwan News. Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  9. ^ Wang, Flor (2 January 2020). "Eight dead, five rescued in UH-60M Black Hawk crash". Central News Agency. Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  10. ^ https://en.nationalhaber.com/taiwan-chief-of-general-staff-killed-in-helicopter-crash-national-news-2//
  11. ^ Chung, Jake (11 January 2020). "Event planned for eight killed in crash". Taipei Times. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  12. ^ Chéng 程, Jiāwén 嘉文 (13 January 2020). "Event沈一鳴移靈 蔡英文現身致祭". United Daily News. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  13. ^ Yu, Matt; Chen, Yun-yu; Lim, Emerson (14 January 2020). "President Tsai pays last respects to black hawk crash victims". Central News Agency. Retrieved 15 January 2020.
  14. ^ Lee, Hsin-fang; Tu, Aaron; Chung, Jake (4 January 2020). "Helicopter Crash: President decorates deceased officers". Taipei Times. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  15. ^ Wen, Kuei-hsiang; Yu, Hsiang; Huang, Frances (4 January 2020). "President conveys air force squad's condolences to late general". Central News Agency. Retrieved 5 January 2020.