Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport

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Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport
Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport logo.png
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport Comm.
Serves Staunton, Waynesboro, Harrisonburg
Location Weyers Cave, Virginia
Opened 1958; 59 years ago (1958)[1]
Elevation AMSL 1,201 ft / 366 m
Coordinates 38°15′50″N 078°53′47″W / 38.26389°N 78.89639°W / 38.26389; -78.89639Coordinates: 38°15′50″N 078°53′47″W / 38.26389°N 78.89639°W / 38.26389; -78.89639
Website www.flyshd.com
Map
SHD is located in Virginia
SHD
SHD
SHD is located in the US
SHD
SHD
Location of airport in Virginia / United States
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
5/23 6,002 1,829 Asphalt
Statistics (2010)
Aircraft operations 18,223
Based aircraft 67

Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (IATA: SHDICAO: KSHDFAA LID: SHD) is a public airport located 10 nautical miles (12 mi, 19 km) northeast of the central business district of Staunton, a city in Augusta County, Virginia, United States.[2] It is mostly used for general aviation, but is also served by one commercial airline. Service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program.

The airport, situated in Weyers Cave, Virginia, is operated by the Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport Commission, which consists of members from the cities of Staunton, Waynesboro and Harrisonburg, and the counties of Augusta and Rockingham.

As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 7,746 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008,[3] 8,364 enplanements in 2009, and 10,408 in 2010.[4] It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport based on enplanements in 2008/2009 (between 2,500 and 10,000 per year).[5]

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport covers an area of 433 acres (175 ha) at an elevation of 1,201 feet (366 m) above mean sea level. It has one runway designated 5/23 with an asphalt surface measuring 6,002 by 150 feet (1,829 x 46 m).[2]

For the 12-month period ending December 31, 2010, the airport had 18,223 aircraft operations, an average of 49 per day: 85% general aviation, 14% air taxi, and 2% military. At that time there were 67 aircraft based at this airport: 60% single-engine, 25% multi-engine, 8% jet, 5% helicopter, and 3% ultralight.[2]

History[edit]

Early history[edit]

Rockingham County, Augusta County, the City of Harrisonburg, the City of Waynesboro, and the City of Staunton formed an airport commission to build a regional airport in the 1950s.[1] Construction of the airport was completed in 1958, and Piedmont Airlines began service using war-surplus DC-3s in 1960.[1]

Additions and renovations[edit]

In 1991, a $900,000 renovation project was completed.[6] The commuter terminal was enlarged by 4,000 square feet (370 m2) and lounge space, secure areas, and concession areas were added.[6]

In 1993, Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport Commission closed its 25-year-old aircraft maintenance shop because it was barely breaking even in costs.[7] The Commission decided that a private company, Classic Aviation Services Inc., would provide aircraft maintenance services at the airport.[7]

In 1996, Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport completed a $2 million project to enlarge public-use areas of the terminal, add an observation area, expand the apron, and add new hangars.[8]

A regional visitor information center was added to the airport in 1996.[9]

Transportation Security Administration took over security screening at the airport in August 2002.[10]

In September 2003, Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport was awarded a $100,000 federal grant to add on-demand ground transportation within Rockingham County and Augusta County.[11]

Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport began free bus service between the airport and Harrisonburg, Staunton, and Waynesboro in March 2004.[12] Bus stops included James Madison University, Eastern Mennonite University, and a Courtyard by Marriott in Harrisonburg.[12]

The airport was awarded a $4.6 million federal grant to repair its runways in May 2004.[13] A $2.9 million federal grant to repair the airport's taxiway was awarded in July 2005.[14]

The airport repaired its transient aircraft aprons with a $1.2 million federal grant in 2009.[15]

The airport completed a $2 million project to add seating and lobby space for passengers, add space for security inspectors, add modern restrooms compliant with the Americans With Disabilities Act, replace its 50-year-old new mechanical and utility systems.[16]

The airport received a $1.6 million federal grant to buy two aircraft-rescue and fire-fighting vehicles in August 2016.[17]

Commercial airline service[edit]

Chatauqua Airlines ran US Airways Express' connector service between Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport and Pittsburgh International Airport from July 1996 to June 2000.[18]

United Express began service between Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport in April 2000.[19] United Express service at the airport ended in December 2001.[20]

Air Midwest offered US Airways Express' connector service between Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport and Pittsburgh International Airport in June 2000.[21] Its service ended in April 2003.[22] Colgan Air began offering US Airways Express' connector service between Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport and Pittsburgh International Airport in April 2003,[22] when the airport became eligible for federal subsidies under the Essential Air Service program.[23] The service to Pittsburgh ended in July 2004 when US Airways downgraded Pittsburgh's status from a hub to a focus city.[24]

US Airways Express restarted service between Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport in April 2005.[24][25] Colgan Air started offering service between Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport in February 2008.[26]

In 2011, Roanoke's representative to Congress Bob Goodlatte advocated ending a federal subsidy program called Essential Air Service that made it financially viable for private airlines to offer service to small airports such as Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport.[27]

In 2012, Colgan Air ended service to Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport after the carrier's parent company declared bankruptcy in 2012.[28] The service was replaced by Silver Airways in July 2012.[29] Silver Airways' service to the airport ended in November 2016.[30]

Frontier Airlines began service between Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport and Orlando International Airport in November 2012.[31] The service was canceled in April 2013 due to low demand.[32]

ViaAir began flights between Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport and Charlotte-Douglas International Airport in September 2016.[30] ViaAir also began flights from Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport to Orlando Sanford International Airport.[30]

Incidents[edit]

In June 2013, an inmate of the Virginia Department of Corrections escaped from a landscaping work program based at Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport.[33] United States Marshals Service recaptured the inmate in Washington, D.C., nine hours later.[34]

Airlines and destinations[edit]

The following airlines offer scheduled passenger service at this airport:

Airlines Destinations
ViaAir Charlotte,[35] Orlando/Sanford

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Wright, Dan. "Five Decades After First Flight, Airport Came to Valley". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). December 17, 2003.
  2. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for SHD (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective April 5, 2012.
  3. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2008" (PDF, 1.0 MB). CY 2008 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. December 18, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2010" (PDF, 189 KB). CY 2010 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2011. 
  5. ^ "2011–2015 NPIAS Report, Appendix A" (PDF, 2.03 MB). National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2010. 
  6. ^ a b Churn, Virginia. "Rising Demand: Terminals' Designer Busy Regional Airports Are a Specialty: One Opens Today". Richmond Times-Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia). November 15, 1992.
  7. ^ a b "Airport Gives Up Repairs Aviation Company to Operate Shop". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). May 20, 1993.
  8. ^ Kushner, Cathy. "Expansion of general aviation terminal at Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport is nearing completion". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). February 12, 1996.
  9. ^ Valley Airport Adds Regional Visitor Information Center". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). December 2, 1996.
  10. ^ "Feds Take Charge Of SVRA Security". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). August 28, 2002.
  11. ^ Wright, Dan. "SVRA Lands $100K Federal Grant". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). September 23, 2003.
  12. ^ a b "SVRA Kicks Off Free Airport Shuttle Service". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). March 3, 2004.
  13. ^ Wright, Dan. "SVRA Gets $4.6 Million Grant For Runway Repairs". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). May 4, 2004.
  14. ^ Wright, Dan. "Airport - Gets Grant To Repair Taxiway - Pavement May Be Renovated By Winter". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). July 30, 2005.
  15. ^ Mitchell, Tom. "Paving The Way: Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport Getting A $1.2 Million Face-Lift". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). October 12, 2009.
  16. ^ "Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport finishing $2 million upgrade". The News Virginian. December 20, 2011.
  17. ^ "Valley airport gets $1.6 million in federal funds". The News Virginian. (Waynesboro, Virginia). August 23, 2016.
  18. ^ "Valley Airport Still Trying To Replace USAirways Flights". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). April 3, 2000.
  19. ^ New Air Carrier Takes Flight In Valley". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). April 3, 2000.
  20. ^ "United Bids Farewell To SVRA". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). December 12, 2001.
  21. ^ "New US Airways Carrier Signs On". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). April 24, 2000.
  22. ^ a b Bradshaw, Vic. "Colgan Air Lands In The Valley". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). March 5, 2003.
  23. ^ Chebium, Raju. "Shenandoah Regional likely to lose subsidies". USA Today. August 12, 2011.
  24. ^ a b Wright, Dan. "Valley Airport To Add Service To Dulles". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). February 12, 2005.
  25. ^ Roundy, Elisabeth. "James Madison U. students now can fly to capital from local airport". The Breeze. James Madison University. February 27, 2005.
  26. ^ LaRoue, Jimmy. "United Express makes return to Weyers Cave". The News Virginian (Waynesboro, Virginia). December 7, 2007.
  27. ^ "Up In The Air: Weyers Cave Airport's Fate Hinges On Future Of Endangered Subsidy Program]". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). August 6, 2011.
  28. ^ Manners, Doug. "Unhappy Landing For SVRA Carrier". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). April 4, 2012.
  29. ^ "Silver Airways replaces Colgan Air at Va. airport". Associated Press. July 25, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c Brown, Tony. "Now Boarding: Service To Florida". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). December 11, 2016.
  31. ^ "Airline To Offer Flights From SVRA To Orlando". Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia). August 16, 2012.
  32. ^ "Frontier to drop Orlando-Shenandoah Valley service". Associated Press. February 3, 2013.
  33. ^ "Va. inmate escapes while on work-release job". Associated Press. June 19, 2013.
  34. ^ "Va. inmate who escaped work release captured in DC". Associated Press. June 20, 2013.
  35. ^ https://www.regulations.gov/contentStreamer?documentId=DOT-OST-2002-11378-0098&attachmentNumber=1&disposition=attachment&contentType=pdf

Bibliography[edit]

  • Essential Air Service documents (Docket OST-2002-11378) from the U.S. Department of Transportation:
    • Order 2003-1-14 (January 17, 2003): selecting Colgan Air, Inc., d/b/a US Airways Express, to provide essential air service at Staunton, Virginia at a subsidy rates of $623,667 for the first year, with an extension for a second year subject to the mutual agreement of the carrier and the Department, and (b) establishing a subsidy rate of $514,211 annually for the hold-in service being operated ay Staunton by Air Midwest, Inc., d/b/a US Airways Express, from April 23, 2002, until Colgan begins service.
    • Order 2004-2-8 (February 9, 2004): selects Colgan Air, Inc., d/b/a US Airways Express, to provide essential air service at Staunton, Virginia, for an additional one-year period beginning May 1, 2004, at a subsidy rate of $615,578.
    • Order 2005-1-2 (January 7, 2005): selecting Colgan Air, Inc., d/b/a/ US Airways Express, to provide essential air service at Staunton, Virginia, for the two-year period beginning May 1, 2005 and establishing final subsidy rate.
    • Order 2007-1-17 (January 26, 2007): selecting Colgan Air, Inc., d/b/a US Airways Express, to provide essential air service at Staunton, Virginia, for the two-year period beginning May 1, 2007, at an annual subsidy rate of $1,389,727.
    • Order 2008-12-29 (December 30, 2008): re-selecting Colgan Air, Inc., d/b/a United Express, to provide subsidized essential air service (EAS) at Staunton, Virginia, for the two-year period beginning May 1, 2009, at the annual subsidy rate of $1,911,466.
    • Order 2011-3-2 (March 1, 2011): selecting Colgan Air, Inc. to provide essential air service (EAS) at Staunton, Virginia, for an annual subsidy of $2,180,461, for the two-year period from May 1, 2011, through April 30, 2013.
    • Ninety-Day Notice (March 8, 2012): from Colgan Airlines, Inc. of termination of Essential Air Service at Staunton, Virginia.
    • Order 2012-3-14 (March 23, 2012): prohibits Colgan Airlines, Inc. d/b/a United Airlines Express, from terminating service at Altoona and Johnstown, PA; Victoria, TX; Staunton, VA; and Beckley, Clarksburg/Fairmont, and Morgantown, WV, for 30 days beyond the end of the 90-day notice period, i.e. July 8, 2012. Also requesting proposals by April 25, 2012, from air carriers interested in providing replacement Essential Air Service (EAS) at Victoria, TX; and Staunton, VA, for a new term, with or without subsidy.

External links[edit]