Sheridan County Airport

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Sheridan County Airport
Sheridan County Airport Logo.png
Summary
Airport typePublic
OwnerSheridan County
ServesSheridan, Wyoming
Elevation AMSL4,021 ft / 1,226 m
Coordinates44°46′09″N 106°58′49″W / 44.76917°N 106.98028°W / 44.76917; -106.98028Coordinates: 44°46′09″N 106°58′49″W / 44.76917°N 106.98028°W / 44.76917; -106.98028
WebsiteSheridanCountyAirport.com
Map
SHR is located in Wyoming
SHR
SHR
SHR is located in the United States
SHR
SHR
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
15/33 8,301 2,530 Asphalt
6/24 5,039 1,536 Asphalt
Statistics (2017)
Aircraft operations30,008
Based aircraft100

Sheridan County Airport (IATA: SHR, ICAO: KSHR, FAA LID: SHR) is in Sheridan County, Wyoming, two miles southwest of Sheridan, Wyoming.[1]

Sheridan once again has scheduled passenger service with nonstop flights to Denver (DEN) on Key Lime Air (Denver Air Connection) 30 seat Fairchild Dornier 328JETs.[2] Recent air service was subsidized by the federal Essential Air Service program until February 2007, when Big Sky Airlines began providing subsidy free service[3] The Big Sky service was suspended in January 2008 when this air carrier went out of business.[4] Great Lakes Airlines was the only other carrier at Sheridan but this carrier abruptly ceased all flights on March 31, 2015. Many Sheridan residents were confused regarding the lack of replacement service, believing that service to Sheridan was still subsidized under Essential Air Service. Federal law had been changed in 2012 so that once Sheridan County had left the EAS program, it could not re-enter it and commercial air service to Sheridan is not funded by EAS anymore.[5]

Federal Aviation Administration records say the airport had 17,710 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008,[6] 14,181 in 2009 and 14,146 in 2010.[7] The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a primary commercial service airport (more than 10,000 enplanements per year).[8]

Facilities

Sheridan County Airport covers 1,550 acres (627 ha) at an elevation of 4,021 feet (1,226 m). It has two asphalt runways: 15/33 is 8,301 by 100 feet (2,530 x 30 m) and 6/24 is 5,039 by 75 feet (1,536 x 23 m).[1]

In 2017 the airport had 30,008 aircraft operations, average 82 per day: 95% general aviation, 5% air taxi, and <1% military. 100 aircraft were then based at this airport: 77% single-engine, 18% multi-engine, 1% jet, 2% helicopter, and 2% glider.[1]

Bighorn Airways offers airplane and helicopter charter service and an aircraft repair and installation center.

Airline and destination

AirlinesDestinations
United Express Denver, Riverton[9]

SkyWest Airlines, operating as United Express, replaced Key Lime Air service to Denver on January 12, 2020 when the company took over the Essential Air Service contract for both Riverton and Sheridan.[10]

Past airline service

Sheridan first received airline service in 1931 when Wyoming Air Service began a route from Denver to Billings, Montana via Cheyenne, Casper, and Sheridan. The carrier changed its name to Inland Airlines in 1938 and was bought by Western Airlines in 1944. Aircraft operated by Western to the airport included Douglas DC-3s and DC-6Bs followed by Lockheed L-188 Electras and Boeing 737-200s, an example being Denver-Cheyenne-Casper-Sheridan-Billings-Great Falls with some Electras continuing to Calgary.[11][12] In 1966 Western Electras flew Los Angeles-San Diego-Phoenix-Denver-Cheyenne-Casper-Sheridan-Billings.[13] Western was the only airline to operate mainline jets to Sheridan; it dropped Sheridan in 1980.[14] Aspen Airways (United Express) flew BAe 146-100s Sheridan to United Airlines hub in Denver at times in the late 1980s.

Commuter and regional airlines served Sheridan after Western, with flights primarily to Denver, many via Gillette, Wyoming.[15]

References

  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for SHR (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective April 5, 2012.
  2. ^ http://www.denveriarconnection.com
  3. ^ "Order 2006-10-19". U.S. Department of Transportation. October 31, 2006.
  4. ^ "Order 2007-12-27". U.S. Department of Transportation. December 27, 2007.
  5. ^ Blair, Pat. Airport Manager Clarifies What Happened to EAS, Sheridan Media, May 4, 2015, Retrieved 2015-05-07
  6. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2008" (PDF, 1.0 MB). CY 2008 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. December 18, 2009. External link in |work= (help)
  7. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2010" (PDF, 189 KB). CY 2010 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2011. External link in |work= (help)
  8. ^ "2011–2015 NPIAS Report, Appendix A" (PDF, 2.03 MB). National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2010. External link in |work= (help)
  9. ^ Liu, Jim. "United 1Q20 Domestic network additions". Routesonline. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  10. ^ Exchange, Wyoming News. "SkyWest service to Riverton to begin in January". Gillette News Record. Retrieved 2019-08-24.
  11. ^ http://www.timetableimages.com, August 1, 1968 Western timetable
  12. ^ http://www.departedflights.com, Sept. 6, 1973 Western timetable
  13. ^ http://www.timetableimages.com, Aug. 1, 1966 Western timetable
  14. ^ http://www.departedflights.com, July 1, 1978 Western timetable
  15. ^ Timetables and the American Express SkyGuide
  16. ^ http://www.denverairconnection.com

Other sources

  • Essential Air Service documents (Docket OST-1998-3506) from the U.S. Department of Transportation:
    • Order 2005-1-7 (January 10, 2005): selecting Big Sky Transportation Co., d/b/a/ Big Sky Airlines (Big Sky) to provide essential air service with 19-passenger Fairchild Metro III/23 aircraft at Sheridan, Wyoming, for two years. And also directing Great Lakes Aviation, Ltd., to show cause regarding the subsidy rate on an annual basis, for its provision of service from November 1, 2004, until Big Sky Airlines inaugurates essential air service at Sheridan.
    • Order 2006-10-19 (October 31, 2006): vacating Order 2006-10-11, which requested proposals from carriers interested in providing essential air service (EAS) at Sheridan, Wyoming, for a new two-year period, beginning February 1, 2007, with or without subsidy. Beginning February 1, 2007, the Department will rely on Big Sky Transportation Co., d/b/a Big Sky Airlines to provide subsidy-free EAS at Sheridan.
    • Notice (December 19, 2007): of Big Sky Transportation Co. d/b/a Big Sky Airlines of the termination of its unsubsidized scheduled service at Sheridan, Wyoming, effective on January 7, 2008.
    • Order 2007-12-27 (December 27, 2007): allowing Big Sky Transportation Co., d/b/a Big Sky Airlines, to suspend its unsubsidized scheduled air services at Sheridan, Wyoming, and Trenton, New Jersey, as of January 7, 2008.

External links