Shi Zhengli

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Shi Zhengli
Born (1964-05-26) 26 May 1964 (age 55)
EducationWuhan University
Wuhan Institute of Virology
Montpellier 2 University
Scientific career
FieldsVirology
InstitutionsWuhan Institute of Virology
Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese

Shi Zhengli (Chinese: 石正丽; born 26 May 1964) is a Chinese virologist and writer. She is a researcher at the Wuhan Institute of Virology (WIV), which is part of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). Shi and her colleague Cui Jie found that the SARS virus originated in bats.[1][2] Shi is a member of the Virology Committee of the Chinese Society for Microbiology. She is an editor of the Board of Virologica Sinica, Chinese Journal of Virology, and Journal of Fishery Sciences of China.

Early life[edit]

Shi was born in May 1964 in Xixia County, Henan, China.[3] She graduated from Wuhan University in 1987. She received her master's degree from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in 1990 and her Ph.D. from Montpellier 2 University in France in 2000.

Research[edit]

In 2005, a team led by Shi Zhengli and Cui Jie found that the SARS virus originated in bats.[4] The results were published in Science in 2005 and Journal of General Virology in 2006.[5]

From 2014, Shi Zhengli was the recipient of a number of US Government grants as well as grants from the National Basic Research program of China, the Chinese Academy of Science, the National Natural Science Foundation of China, and from the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences, to assist in funding research into coronaviruses.[6]

During the 2019–20 coronavirus outbreak, Shi and twelve other Institute scientists formed an expert group on the research of Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).[7][8] In February 2020, researchers led by Shi Zhengli published an article in Nature titled "A pneumonia outbreak associated with a new coronavirus of probable bat origin",[9] and in a post on bioRxiv, said that the SARS-CoV 2 is in the same family as SARS and closest to one found in bats.[10][11] In February 2020, her team published a paper in Cell Research showing that remdesivir, an experimental drug owned by Gilead Sciences, had a positive effect in inhibiting the virus in vitro, and applied for a patent for the drug in China on behalf of the WIV.[12][13][14]

In February 2020, the South China Morning Post reported that Shi's decade-long work to build up one of the world's largest databases of bat-related viruses gave the scientific community a "head start" in understanding the virus.[15] The SCMP also reported that Shi was the focus of personal attacks in Chinese social media who claimed the WIV was the sources of the virus, leading Shi to post: "I swear with my life, [the virus] has nothing to do with the lab", and when asked by the SCMP to comment on the attacks, Shi responded: "My time must be spent on more important matters".[15] Caixin reported Shi made further public statements against "perceived tinfoil-hat theories about the new virus's source", quoting her as saying: "The novel 2019 coronavirus is nature punishing the human race for keeping uncivilized living habits. I, Shi Zhengli, swear on my life that it has nothing to do with our laboratory".[16]

Honours[edit]

See Also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yang Wanli (7 December 2017). "Scientists close in on origin of SARS". Chinadaily. Archived from the original on 7 February 2019. Retrieved 6 February 2019.
  2. ^ "Archived copy" 一位女科学家的风采——武汉病毒研究所石正丽博士. 163.com (in Chinese). 2007-05-25. Archived from the original on 2019-02-07. Retrieved 2019-02-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Archived copy" 石正丽:与病毒相伴的女科学家. sciencenet.cn (in Chinese). 2009-03-10. Archived from the original on 2019-02-07. Retrieved 2019-02-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ David Cyranoski (1 October 2017). "Bat cave solves mystery of deadly SARS virus — and suggests new outbreak could occur". nature.com. Archived from the original on 17 January 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  5. ^ Lu Wei (鲁伟); Liu Zheng (刘铮) (10 March 2009). "Archived copy" 石正丽:与病毒相伴的女科学家. sciencenet.cn (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 7 February 2019. Retrieved 26 January 2020.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ Adrian Bond (27 January 2020). "Coronavirus Exposed, Part 1 Communist Coverup, or Pandemic Bioweapon of Mass Destruction?". medium.com. Archived from the original on 29 January 2020. Retrieved 29 January 2020.
  7. ^ Zhang Juan (张隽); Guan Xiyan (关喜艳) (24 January 2020). 石正丽等13位专家组队 攻关新型肺炎研究. people.com.cn (in Chinese). Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  8. ^ Jon Cohen (1 February 2020). "Mining coronavirus genomes for clues to the outbreak's origins". Science. Retrieved 4 February 2020. team led by Shi Zheng-Li, a coronavirus specialist at the Wuhan Institute of Virology, reported on 23 January on bioRxiv that 2019-nCoV’s sequence was 96.2% similar to a bat virus and had 79.5% similarity to the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a disease whose initial outbreak was also in China more than 15 years ago.
  9. ^ Shi Zhengli; Team of 29 researchers at the WIV (3 February 2020). "A pneumonia outbreak associated with a new coronavirus of probable bat origin". Nature.
  10. ^ "Discovery of a novel coronavirus associated with the recent pneumonia outbreak in humans and its potential bat origin". biorxiv.org. 23 January 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  11. ^ Antonio Regalado (23 January 2020). "Virus in Chinese outbreak is closest to one from bats, not snakes". technologyreview. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  12. ^ Shi Zhengli; Team of 10 researchers at the WIV (4 February 2020). "Remdesivir and chloroquine effectively inhibit the recently emerged novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in vitro". Cell Research.
  13. ^ "China Wants to Patent Gilead's Experimental Coronavirus Drug". Bloomberg News. Retrieved 2020-02-05.
  14. ^ Denise Grady (6 February 2020). "China Begins Testing an Antiviral Drug in Coronavirus Patients". New York Times. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  15. ^ a b Stephen Chen (6 February 2020). "Coronavirus: bat scientist's cave exploits offer hope to beat virus 'sneakier than Sars'". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  16. ^ Yang Rui; Feng Yuding; Zhao Jinchao; Matthew Walsh (7 February 2020). "Wuhan Virology Lab Deputy Director Again Slams Coronavirus Conspiracies". Caixin. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  17. ^ 法国驻华大使亲临武汉病毒所为袁志明、石正丽研究员授勋 (in Chinese). Wuhan Institute of Virology. 2016-06-20.
  18. ^ Huang Haihua (黄海华) (24 January 2020). 新型冠状病毒可能来源于蝙蝠!“蝙蝠女侠”石正丽发现其与蝙蝠冠状病毒同源性为96%. sina (in Chinese). Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  19. ^ "Archived copy" 学界大牛!12位华人学者当选2019年美国微生物科学院院士. xincailiao.com (in Chinese). 2019-02-03. Archived from the original on 2019-02-07. Retrieved 2019-02-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External links[edit]