Shibli–Umm al-Ghanam

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Shibli–Umm al-Ghanam
  • שִׁבְּלִי-אֻם אל-עַ'נַם
  • الشبلي - أم الغنم
Hebrew transcription(s)
 • ISO 259 Šibbli - ʔumm ˀel-Ránem (Israeli pronunciation)
View of Shibli
View of Shibli
Shibli–Umm al-Ghanam is located in Israel
Shibli–Umm al-Ghanam
Shibli–Umm al-Ghanam
Coordinates: 32°41′03″N 35°23′49″E / 32.68417°N 35.39694°E / 32.68417; 35.39694Coordinates: 32°41′03″N 35°23′49″E / 32.68417°N 35.39694°E / 32.68417; 35.39694
Grid position 186/231 PAL
District Northern
Founded 1992
Government
 • Type Local council (from 1992)
Area
 • Total 2,879 dunams (2.879 km2 or 1.112 sq mi)
Population (2005)
 • Total 4,800
Name meaning Khirbet Umm el Ghanem=The ruin with the sheep[1]

Shibli–Umm al-Ghanam (Arabic: الشبلي - أم الغنم‎, Hebrew: שִׁבְּלִי-אֻם אל-עַ'נַם) is an Arab town at the foot of Mount Tabor in Israel's North District. According to the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, Shibli–Umm al-Ghanam had a population of 4,800 inhabitants in 2005.[2]

History[edit]

Archaeological excavations have revealed flint from the Mousterian culture, several knapped using the Levallois technique.[3]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1517, the village was included in the Ottoman empire with the rest of Palestine, and in the 1596 tax-records it appeared as Um al-Ganam, located in the Nahiya of Tabariyya of the Liwa of Safad. The population was 8 households, all Muslim. They paid a fixed tax- rate of 25% on agricultural products, including wheat, barley and summer crops, in addition to occasional revenues, and goats and beehives; a total of 1910 Akçe.[4][5]

In 1875, Victor Guérin found here "several ancient cisterns, still unbroken, and ancient caves cut in rock, which now serve as refuge for shepherds."[6] In 1881 the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine found at Kh. Umm el Ghanem: "Heaps of stones, a few of which are hewn, all of small size, one small cave and one cistern."[7]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Umm al Ghanam had a population of 52, all Muslims.[8] In the 1931 census the population of Umm al-Ghanam was counted with that of Reineh, together they had 1015 inhabitants in a total of 243 houses.[9]

In 1945 the population of Umm al-Ghanam was counted with that of Mount Tabor, and their the total land area was 8,409 dunams, according to an official land and population survey.[10] Of this, 232 dunams were allocated for plantations and irrigable land, 6,215 for cereals,[11] while a total of 1,962 dunams were classified as non-cultivable land.[12]

1948, aftermath[edit]

The town was formed in 1992 as a result of a municipal merger of the villages of Shibli and Umm al-Ghanam.

Shibli High School is attended by 270 Arab students, many from underprivileged backgrounds. Special educational programs introduced at the school have boosted the Bagrut matriculation pass rate and percentage of graduates attending university.[13]

Hassan Saida of Shibli–Umm Al-Ghanam owns a collection of small cast lead books featuring what is believed to be the first-ever portrait of Jesus. The books are thought to have been created by followers of Jesus in the first decades after his crucifixion. The books, containing cryptic messages in Hebrew and ancient Greek, have been in Saida's family since they were found by his great-grandfather.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 130
  2. ^ Localities with populations of 1,000 or above Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics
  3. ^ Tepper, 2015, ‘Ein Umm el-Ghanam
  4. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 189
  5. ^ Note that Rhode, 1979, p. 6 writes that the register that Hütteroth and Abdulfattah studied was not from 1595/6, but from 1548/9
  6. ^ Guérin, 1880, p. 140; as given in Conder and Kitchener, SWP I, p. 409
  7. ^ Conder and Kitchener, SWP I, p. 409
  8. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Nazareth, p. 38
  9. ^ Mills, 1932, p.73
  10. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 62
  11. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 110
  12. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 160
  13. ^ World ORT, Shibli High School
  14. ^ Lost for 2,000 years... Could this be the first portrait of Jesus?

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]