Nintendo Entertainment Planning & Development

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Nintendo Entertainment Planning & Development
Native name
任天堂企画制作本部
Nintendō Kikaku Seisaku Honbu
Division
IndustryVideo game industry
Predecessors
FoundedSeptember 16, 2015; 3 years ago (2015-09-16)
FounderTatsumi Kimishima
Headquarters,
Japan
Key people
ParentNintendo

Nintendo Entertainment Planning & Development Division[a], commonly abbreviated as Nintendo EPD, is the largest division within the Japanese video game company Nintendo. The division focuses on developing and producing video games, mobile apps, and other related entertainment software for the company. EPD was created after a merger of the company's former Entertainment Analysis & Development (EAD) and Software Planning & Development (SPD) divisions in September 2015.

History[edit]

The division was created on September 16, 2015 after the consolidation of two of Nintendo's former software divisions, Entertainment Analysis & Development (EAD) and Software Planning & Development (SPD), as part of a company-wide organizational restructure that took place under Nintendo's then newly appointed president, Tatsumi Kimishima.[1][2][3]

The division assumed both of its predecessors' roles, focusing on the development of games and software for Nintendo platforms and mobile devices; it also manages and licenses the company's various intellectual properties, alongside producing and supervising development for contracted studios. Shinya Takahashi serves as the general manager of the division, with Katsuya Eguchi and Yoshiaki Koizumi serving below as deputy general managers and Yoshio Sakamoto and Takashi Tezuka acting as executive officer.[3]

Gameography[edit]

List of video games developed and produced by Nintendo Entertainment Planning & Development
Year Title Genre(s) Platform(s) Ref.
2015 The Legend of Zelda: Tri Force Heroes[co 1] Action-adventure Nintendo 3DS [4]
Animal Crossing: Amiibo Festival[co 2] Party Wii U [5]
Mario Tennis: Ultra Smash[co 3] Sports Wii U [6]
Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam[co 4] Role-playing Nintendo 3DS [7]
2016 The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD[co 5] Action-adventure Wii U [8]
Miitomo Social networking service Android [9]
iOS
Star Fox Zero[co 6] Scrolling shooter Wii U [10]
Star Fox Guard[co 6] Tower defense Wii U [10]
Animal Crossing: New Leaf - Welcome Amiibo Social simulation Nintendo 3DS [11]
Miitopia Role-playing game Nintendo 3DS [12]
Super Mario Run Platformer iOS [13]
Android
Tank Troopers[co 7] Action Nintendo 3DS [14]
2017 Fire Emblem Heroes[co 8] Tactical role-playing Android [15]
iOS
1-2-Switch Party Nintendo Switch [16]
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Action-adventure Nintendo Switch [17]
Wii U
Mario Kart 8 Deluxe Kart racing Nintendo Switch [18][19]
Arms Fighting Nintendo Switch [20]
Splatoon 2 Third-person shooter Nintendo Switch [21]
Metroid: Samus Returns[co 9] Action, platformer Nintendo 3DS [22]
Super Mario Odyssey Platformer Nintendo Switch [23]
Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp[co 2] Social simulation Android [24]
iOS
2018 Nintendo Labo: Toy-Con 01 - Variety Kit and Toy-Con 02 - Robot Kit[b] Construction set Nintendo Switch [25]
Sushi Striker: The Way of Sushido[co 10] Puzzle Nintendo 3DS [26]
Nintendo Switch
Nintendo Labo: Toy-Con 03 - Vehicle Kit[c] Construction set Nintendo Switch [25]
WarioWare Gold[co 8] Action Nintendo 3DS [27]
Dragalia Lost[co 11] Action role-playing Android [28]
iOS
2019 Nintendo Labo: Toy-Con 04 - VR Kit[d] Construction set Nintendo Switch [25]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Japanese: 任天堂企画制作本部 Hepburn: Nintendō Kikaku Seisaku Honbu?
  2. ^ Nintendo Labo is a brand of cardboard-based DIY construction sets that use the Nintendo Switch, with included software, and its Joy-Con controllers in a variety of different ways
  3. ^ Nintendo Labo is a brand of cardboard-based DIY construction sets that use the Nintendo Switch, with included software, and its Joy-Con controllers in a variety of different ways
  4. ^ Nintendo Labo is a brand of cardboard-based DIY construction sets that use the Nintendo Switch, with included software, and its Joy-Con controllers in a variety of different ways
  1. ^ Codeveloped with Grezzo.
  2. ^ a b Codeveloped with Nd Cube.
  3. ^ Codeveloped with Camelot Software Planning.
  4. ^ Codeveloped with AlphaDream.
  5. ^ Codeveloped with Tantalus Media.
  6. ^ a b Codeveloped with PlatinumGames.
  7. ^ Codeveloped with Vitei.
  8. ^ a b Co-developed with Intelligent Systems.
  9. ^ Co-developed with MercurySteam.
  10. ^ Co-developed with indieszero.
  11. ^ Co-developed with Cygames.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yoshimura, Takuya (September 14, 2015). "Notice Regarding Personnel Change of a Representative Director and Role Changes of Directors" (PDF). www.nintendo.co.jp. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  2. ^ Kohler, Chris (September 14, 2015). "Nintendo Consolidates Its Game Development Teams". Wired. Condé Nast. Archived from the original on September 15, 2015. Retrieved September 15, 2015.
  3. ^ a b Rad, Chloi; Otero, Jose (September 14, 2015). "Nintendo Reveals Restructuring Plans". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on September 15, 2015. Retrieved September 15, 2015.
  4. ^ Otero, Jose (June 16, 2015). "E3 2015: The Legend of Zelda: Triforce Heroes Revealed for 3DS". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on June 16, 2015. Retrieved April 28, 2016.
  5. ^ Sarkar, Samit (June 16, 2015). "Animal Crossing: amiibo Festival coming to Wii U, plus four new Animal Crossing amiibo". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on June 16, 2015. Retrieved April 28, 2016.
  6. ^ Nintendo, Camelot Software Planning (November 20, 2015). Mario Tennis: Ultra Smash. Wii U. Nintendo. Scene: Staff Credits.
  7. ^ AlphaDream; Nintendo (December 3, 2015). Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Staff Credits.
  8. ^ Otero, Jose (November 12, 2015). "The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD Announced for Wii U". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on November 15, 2015. Retrieved April 28, 2016.
  9. ^ Otero, Jose (March 31, 2016). "5 Things We Learned About Miitomo and Nintendo's Digital Future". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on March 31, 2016. Retrieved April 28, 2016.
  10. ^ a b Goldfarb, Andrew (March 3, 2016). "Star Fox Guard Announced, Star Fox Zero Amiibo Functionality Revealed". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved April 28, 2016.
  11. ^ Frank, Allegra. "Animal Crossing: New Leaf's big amiibo update is available now". Polygon. Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  12. ^ "Miitopia Interview With Nintendo Kawamoto now". Famitsu (in Japanese). Retrieved November 2, 2016.
  13. ^ Peckham, Matt. "5: Time Interview with Shigeru Miyamoto on Super Mario Run". Time. Retrieved September 8, 2016.
  14. ^ "Tank Troopers – developed by Vitei, how the game came to be, voice acting from Nintendo staff". nintendoeverything.com. Retrieved January 2, 2017.
  15. ^ Pereira, Chris. "Here's How the Fire Emblem Mobile Game Works". GameSpot. Retrieved January 18, 2017.
  16. ^ Sanchez, Miranda. "1-2 Switch Announced for Nintendo Switch". IGN. Retrieved January 13, 2017.
  17. ^ McIlroy, Shaun (April 27, 2016). "The Legend of Zelda will release in 2017 for NX, Wii U". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on April 28, 2016. Retrieved April 28, 2016.
  18. ^ Sanchez, Miranda. "Mario Kart 8 Deluxe Announced for Nintendo Switch". IGN. Retrieved January 13, 2017.
  19. ^ Schwartz, Terri. "Famitsu Interview with Kosuke Yabuki". Famitsu (in Japanese). Retrieved February 6, 2017.
  20. ^ Schwartz, Terri. "Arms Announced for Nintendo Switch". IGN. Retrieved January 13, 2017.
  21. ^ Dornbush, Jonathon. "Splatoon 2 Announced for Nintendo Switch". IGN. Retrieved January 13, 2017.
  22. ^ Knezevic, Kevin (June 15, 2017). "Metroid Producer Talks MercurySteam's Contributions To Samus Returns". GameSpot.
  23. ^ Sanchez, Miranda. "Super Mario Odyssey Announced for Nintendo Switch". IGN. Retrieved January 13, 2017.
  24. ^ Frank, Allegra. "Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp for mobile out next month". Polygon. Retrieved October 25, 2017.
  25. ^ a b c Webster, Andrew. "Nintendo is making a bunch of weird DIY cardboard toys for the Switch and they're awesome". The Verge. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  26. ^ Frank, Allegra. "Sushi Striker: The Way of Sushido heading to the Switch in June". Polygon. Retrieved March 8, 2018.
  27. ^ Frank, Allegra. "WarioWare Gold brings back the microgames — to 3DS this time". Polygon. Retrieved March 8, 2018.
  28. ^ Wong, Alistair. "Dragalia Lost Takes Place In A World Where Royalty Can Transform Into Dragons". Siliconera. Retrieved 27 June 2018.