Shirley Majors

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Shirley Majors
Shirley Majors.jpg
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1913-05-07)May 7, 1913
Moore County, Tennessee
Died April 5, 1981(1981-04-05) (aged 67)
Westmoreland, Tennessee
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1949–1956 Huntland HS (TN)
1957–1977 Sewanee
Head coaching record
Overall 93–74–5 (college)
108–24–2 (high school)

Shirley Majors (May 7, 1913 – April 5, 1981) was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Huntland High School in Franklin County, Tennessee from 1949 to 1956 and at Sewanee: The University of the South from 1957 to 1977. At Sewanee, he compiled a record of 93–74–5. 93 wins is the most of any Sewanee coach.

Majors was the patriarch of a football family. His sons included two All-Americans in football at the University of Tennessee, Bobby and Johnny, Bill, who was an assistant at Tennessee until his death in an auto accident in 1965, Larry, who played for Tennessee, and Joe, who played at Florida State University and with the Houston Oilers of the National Football League.[1][2][3] The Majors athletes were inducted into the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame as a family in 1966.[4]

Head coaching record[edit]

College[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Sewanee Tigers (Independent) (1957–1961)
1957 Sewanee 5–2–1
1958 Sewanee 8–0
1959 Sewanee 4–3–1
1960 Sewanee 4–3–1
1961 Sewanee 5–2–1
Sewanee Tigers (Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference) (1962–1977)
1962 Sewanee 4–3–1
1963 Sewanee 8–0
1964 Sewanee 8–1
1965 Sewanee 7–1
1966 Sewanee 2–6
1967 Sewanee 5–3
1968 Sewanee 4–4
1969 Sewanee 2–6
1970 Sewanee 2–6
1971 Sewanee 2–6
1972 Sewanee 3–5
1973 Sewanee 5–3
1974 Sewanee 2–6
1975 Sewanee 6–3
1976 Sewanee 5–4
1977 Sewanee 2–6
Sewanee: 93–74–5
Total: 93–74–5

References[edit]

  1. ^ UPI (April 7, 1981). "Shirley Majors of Football Family In Tennessee, a Longtime Coach". The New York Times. Retrieved June 7, 2010. 
  2. ^ Rhoden, William C. (September 27, 1992). "COLLEGE FOOTBALL; Nice Homecoming for Majors". The New York Times. Retrieved June 7, 2010. 
  3. ^ Whitehouse, Ken (January 4, 2007). "Prominent lobbyist dies in his sleep". NashvillePost.com. Retrieved June 7, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Inductees". Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved June 7, 2010. 

External links[edit]