Shishugou Formation

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Shishugou Formation
Stratigraphic range: Middle-Late Jurassic
Type Geological formation
Sub-units Wucaiwan Member
Underlies Tugulu Group
Overlies Xishanyao Formation[1]
Location
Country  China

The Shishugou Formation (simplified Chinese: 石树沟组; traditional Chinese: 石樹溝組; pinyin: Shíshùgōu Zǔ) is a geological formation in Xinjiang, China, whose strata date back to the Late Jurassic period. Dinosaur remains are among the fossils that have been recovered from the formation.[2] (see Junggar Basin dinosaur trap). The Shishugou Formation is considered one of the most phylogenetically and trophically diverse middle to late Jurassic theropod fauna.[3]

The Wucaiwan Formation, once considered a separate, underlying formation,[4] is now considered the lowest unit of the Shishugou Formation.

Fauna[edit]

Ornithischians[edit]

Undescribed stegosaur is present in the Wucaiwan member.[4] Undescribed ornithopod is present in the Wucaiwan member.[4] Undescribed ankylosaurs present in both upper Shishugou and Wucaiwan members.[2]

Genus Species Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes Images
Eugongbusaurus

Eugongbusaurus wucaiwanensis

Undescribed ornithopod, previously classified as Gongbusaurus wucaiwanensis[2]

Jiangjunosaurus

Jiangjunosaurus junggarensis

A stegosaur.[5]

Yinlong

Yinlong downsi

A ceratopsian.[6]

Pterosaurs[edit]

Genus Species Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes Images

Sericipterus

Sericipterus wucaiwanensis

A rhamphorhynchid[7]

Kryptodrakon

Kryptodrakon progenitor

A pterodactyloid

Sauropods[edit]

Sauropods reported from the Shishugou Formation
Genus Species Stratigraphic position Material Notes Images

Bellusaurus

Bellusaurus sui

Wucaiwan member

A sauropod, geographically located in Xinjiang Uygur Zizhiqu, China.[4]

Klamelisaurus

Klamelisaurus gobiensis

Wucaiwan member

A sauropod, geographically located in Xinjiang Uygur Zizhiqu, China.[4]

Mamenchisaurus

Mamenchisaurus sinocanadorum

"Partial skull and skeleton."[8]

A sauropod.[2]

Tienshanosaurus

Tienshanosaurus chitaiensis

"Partial postcranial skeleton."[9]

A sauropod.[2]

Theropods[edit]

Undescribed ornithomimosaur.[2] Indeterminate tetanuran remains.[2]

Genus Species Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes Images

Aorun

A. zhaoi

Wucaiwan member

A Coelurosaur.[3]

Guanlong

Guanlong wucaii

A tyrannosauroid.[10]

Haplocheirus

Haplocheirus sollers

An alvarezsauroid[11]

Limusaurus

Limusaurus inextricabilis

An herbivorous ceratosaur.[12]

Monolophosaurus

Monolophosaurus jiangi

Wucaiwan member

A tetanuran, geographically located in Xinjiang Uygur Zizhiqu, China.[4]

Sinraptor

Sinraptor dongi

An allosauroid.[2]

Zuolong

Zuolong salleei

A basal Coelurosaur.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vincent SJ, Allen MB (2001). "Sedimentary record of Mesozoic intracontinental deformation in the eastern Juggar Basin, northwest China: response to orogeny at the Asian margin". In Hendrix MS, Davis GA. Paleozoic and Mesozoic Tectonic Evolution of Central and Eastern Asia. Colorado, US: The Geological Society of America, Inc. pp. 354–356. ISBN 0813711940. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Weishampel, David B; et al. (2004). "Dinosaur distribution (Late Jurassic, Asia)." In: Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. Pp. 550–552. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.
  3. ^ a b Choiniere JN, Clark JM, Forster CM, Norell MA, Eberth DA, Erickson GM, Chu H, Xu X (2013). "A juvenile specimen of a new coelurosaur (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Middle–Late Jurassic Shishugou Formation of Xinjiang, People's Republic of China". Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. online (2): 177. doi:10.1080/14772019.2013.781067. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Weishampel, David B; et al. (2004). "Dinosaur distribution (Middle Jurassic, Asia)." In: Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. Pp. 541–542. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.
  5. ^ Chengkai, Jia; Forster, Catherine A; Xing, Xu; Clark, James M. (2007). "The first stegosaur (Dinosauria, Ornithischia) from the Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation of Xinjiang, China". Acta Geologica Sinica (English edition) 81 (3): 351–356. doi:10.1111/j.1755-6724.2007.tb00959.x. 
  6. ^ Xu, X.; Forster, C.A.; Clark, J.M.; Mo, J. (2006). "A basal ceratopsian with transitional features from the Late Jurassic of northwestern China". Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 273 (1598): 2135–2140. doi:10.1098/rspb.2006.3566. PMC 1635516. PMID 16901832. 
  7. ^ Andres, B.; Clark, J. M.; Xing, X. (2010). "A new rhamphorhynchid pterosaur from the Upper Jurassic of Xinjiang, China, and the phylogenetic relationships of basal pterosaurs". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 30 (1): 163–187. doi:10.1080/02724630903409220. 
  8. ^ "Table 13.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 262.
  9. ^ "Table 13.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 271.
  10. ^ Xu X., Clark, J.M., Forster, C. A., Norell, M.A., Erickson, G.M., Eberth, D.A., Jia, C., and Zhao, Q. (2006). "A basal tyrannosauroid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of China". Nature 439 (7077): 715–718. Bibcode:2006Natur.439..715X. doi:10.1038/nature04511. PMID 16467836. 
  11. ^ Choiniere, J. N.; Xu, X.; Clark, J. M.; Forster, C. A.; Guo, Y.; Han, F. (2010). "A basal alvarezsauroid theropod from the Early Late Jurassic of Xinjiang, China". Science 327 (5965): 571–574. Bibcode:2010Sci...327..571C. doi:10.1126/science.1182143. PMID 20110503. 
  12. ^ Xu, X.; Clark, JM; Mo, J; Choiniere, J; Forster, CA; Erickson, GM; Hone, DW; Sullivan, C et al. (2009). "A Jurassic ceratosaur from China helps clarify avian digital homologies". Nature 459 (7249): 940–944. Bibcode:2009Natur.459..940X. doi:10.1038/nature08124. PMID 19536256. 
  13. ^ Jonah N. Choiniere, James M. Clark, Catherine A. Forster and Xing Xu (2010). "A basal coelurosaur (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Late Jurassic (Oxfordian) of the Shishugou Formation in Wucaiwan, People’s Republic of China". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 30 (6): 1773–1796. doi:10.1080/02724634.2010.520779.