Shock Wave (Six Flags Over Texas)

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Shock Wave
Shock Wave SFOT.jpg
Shockwave coaster sfot.jpg
Six Flags Over Texas
Park sectionTower
Coordinates32°45′32″N 97°04′14″W / 32.75889°N 97.07056°W / 32.75889; -97.07056Coordinates: 32°45′32″N 97°04′14″W / 32.75889°N 97.07056°W / 32.75889; -97.07056
StatusOperating
Opening dateApril 22, 1978
General statistics
TypeSteel
ManufacturerAnton Schwarzkopf
DesignerWerner Stengel
Modelcustom looping
Lift/launch systemChain lift hill
Height116 ft (35 m)
Drop105 ft (32 m)
Length3,600 ft (1,100 m)
Speed60 mph (97 km/h)
Inversions2
Duration2:00
Max vertical angle46°
Capacity1100 riders per hour
G-force5.9
Height restriction42 in (107 cm)
Trains7 cars. Riders are arranged 2 across in 2 rows for a total of 28 riders per train.
Shock Wave at RCDB
Pictures of Shock Wave at RCDB

Shock Wave is a steel roller coaster located at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas. Built right at the edge of the park, the Shock Wave is easily seen by passers-by on Interstate Highway 30. Its unique four-sided tube truss track system is similar to the Mind Bender roller coaster at Six Flags Over Georgia which was constructed at the same time.

History[edit]

When it opened in 1978, Shock Wave was the tallest roller coaster in the world. It lost this title within weeks upon the opening of The Loch Ness Monster at Busch Gardens: The Old Country.

The ride is built on Johnson Creek real estate and had to temporarily close in the 2004 season because of a flood. Shock Wave was temporarily closed again in early 2008 for an extensive remodeling.[1]

Six Flags announced on March 3, 2016, that Shock Wave would be among several rides at various parks that would receive a virtual reality (VR) upgrade. Riders had the option to wear Samsung Gear VR headsets, powered by Oculus, to create a 360-degree, 3D experience while riding. The virtual reality experience was called, The New Revolution, themed to a fighter jet, has riders flying through a futuristic city as co-pilots battling alien invaders. The feature debuted with the coaster when it reopened in spring of 2016.[2] For the park's annual Fright Fest, the virtual reality ride became Rage of the Gargoyles.[3]

In 2017, Six Flags discontinued the VR experience on Shockwave. References to the VR experience have since been removed from the ride's information page on Six Flags' official website.

Ride experience[edit]

The final drop on the Shock Wave (2010)

The ride starts by passing through the transfer table and up the lift-hill 116 feet (35 m). A slight dip into a right-hand U-turn leads into the first drop. The ride then negotiates two back-to-back vertical loops, with g-forces reaching up to 5.9 G.[4] The ride then travels up a hill into a small mid-course brake run. At this point, the ride turns right into a second U-Turn and dives down the second drop. Then quickly up a hill leading into a third U-turn to the left, over and around the ride's station. Then quickly travels down the third and final large drop. This is followed by a climb into a hill leading into a small left turn. Which leads into a long bunny hop over the creek. The ride then transitions into a 200° right turn leading into the brake run before returning to the station. The ride passes over Johnson Creek a total of four times.

Colors[edit]

Throughout the years, Shock Wave has undergone several re-paintings with different color schemes. When it first opened, the attraction's track and supports were all-white. The solid white color lasted only two years as it quickly became dirty. The second color scheme, introduced in 1980, featured dark blue track and supports. Since then, the ride has been repainted light blue, then silver with navy blue supports.[5] During Time-Warner's ownership of the park the ride was painted with white track, yellow supports and pink loops. The operators jokingly referred to the ride as "fruit loops." The seventh color scheme of blue track with red supports came about in 1996. 2001 marked the 40th anniversary of the park and Shock Wave once again was given a new coat of paint — this time royal blue supports with a bright green track.[5] That paint job remained on the coaster until 2012, when Shock Wave was finally given a much-needed new coat of paint. Similar to the previous color scheme, the present colors are royal blue supports, with a slightly brighter shade of green track.

Awards[edit]

Golden Ticket Awards: Top steel Roller Coasters
Year 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Ranking 17[6] 12[7] 21[8] 27[9] 36 (tie)[10] 34[11] 26[12] 37[13] 36[14] 35[15] 31[16] 34[17] 37[18] 42[19] 26 (tie)[20] 29[21] 40[22] 41[23] -[24] 46[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ www.screamscape.com page on Six Flags over Texas
  2. ^ Steele, Billy (August 5, 2016). "Six Flags adds a gaming twist to its VR roller coasters". AOL Tech. Retrieved August 23, 2016.
  3. ^ Shock Wave Article on schwarzkopf.coaster.net, a fan page by Michael Pantenburg (German/English)
  4. ^ a b Baldwin, Tim (2001). "A Wave of Color". RollerCoaster! Magazine. Vol. 22 no. 4. Mission, Kansas: American Coaster Enthusiasts. pp. 7–11. ISSN 0896-7261.
  5. ^ "Top 25 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. August 1998. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  6. ^ "Top 25 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. August 1999. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  7. ^ "Top 25 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. August 2000. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  8. ^ "Top 25 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. August 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  9. ^ "Top 25 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. September 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  10. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 14–15B. September 2003. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  11. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 18–19B. September 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 3, 2007. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  12. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2005. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  13. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  14. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 11 (6.2): 36–37. September 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  15. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 12 (6.2): 36–37. September 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  16. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 13 (6.2): 32–33. September 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  17. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 14 (6.2): 34–35. September 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  18. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 15 (6.2): 38–39. September 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  19. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 16 (6.2): 36–37. September 2012. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  20. ^ "2013 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 17 (6.2): 34–35. September 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  21. ^ "2014 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 18 (6.2): 46–47. September 2014. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  22. ^ "2015 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 19 (6.2): 49–50. September 2015. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  23. ^ "2016 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 20 (6.2): 50. September 2016. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
  24. ^ "2017 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 21 (6.2): 46. September 2017. Retrieved September 14, 2015.
Preceded by
Revolution
World's Tallest Complete Circuit Roller Coaster
April 1978 – June 1978
Succeeded by
Loch Ness Monster