Shooting Stars S.C.

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Shooting Stars SC
Shooting Stars SC
Full name Shooting Stars Sports Club (3SC)
Nickname(s) Oluyole Warriors
Founded 1950s (As WNDC Ibadan)
Ground Lekan Salami Stadium
Ground Capacity 18,000
Chairman Senator Abiola Ajimobi
Manager NigeriaKadiri Ikhana
League Nigeria Premier League
2015 9th

Shooting Stars Sports Club (often nicknamed 3SC or Oluyole Warriors) is a Nigerian football club based in Ibadan.

History[edit]

Logo of the society

The club was one of the founders of the Nigerian Premier League in 1972, when they were called WNDC Ibadan (Western Nigeria Development Company), and were later called IICC (Industrial Investment and Credit Corporation) Shooting Stars of Ibadan.[1]

The nickname "Shooting Stars" was added with the suggestion of team foundation members the late Jide Johnson and Niyi Omowon the "Aare Odan Liberty" (Generalissimo of Liberty Stadium) who believed that the players were "stars" in their own right.

Shooting Stars is one of the most followed football clubs in Nigeria and play their home matches at the Lekan Salami Stadium. The stadium was named after one of the prominent supporters of the club who is now deceased. Before, "Sooting" as it is called by its supporters used to play at the famous Liberty Stadium, one of the venues for the world youth soccer championship in 1999.

Shooting stars is the first club to win the FA cup on club basis in Nigeria in 1971, players like Aderoju Omowon, Niyi Akande, Jossy Lad, Amusa Adisa were prominent in the squad. Shooting Stars is one of the most decorated clubsides in Nigeria alongside Enugu Rangers and the defunct Stationery Stores of Lagos. In fact, Shooting Stars and Enugu Rangers are known as the traditional football clubs in the country, both dominating the football scene in the country during 1970s and 1980s.

Shooting Stars have played and won many matches against top club sides in Africa. 3SC won the first edition of CAF Cup, defeating the Nakivubo Villa of Uganda 3–0 in the finals at the Lekan Salami stadium after the first leg ended goalless. They won the African Cup Winners' Cup in 1976, becoming the first Nigerian clubside to win an international trophy.[2]

Many well-known international stars have played for Shooting Stars in the past, including former African footballer of the year Rashidi Yekini, "the mathematical" Segun Odegbami and so on.[3]

They ended their 2004–05 season in fifth place in the Premier League. After the introduction of a strange double-league format by the Nigerian Football Association, Shooting Stars got relegated to the lower division in 2006, but won promotion in 2009 after finishing second in the Division 1B.

Crest[edit]

Achievements[edit]

1976, 1980, 1983, 1995, 1998
1971 (as WNDC)
1977, 1979, 1995
1984, 1996
1992
1976
1998

Performance in CAF competitions[edit]

1999 – Group Stage
1972 – Second Round
1981 – Second Round
1984 – Runners-up
1996 – Runners-up
1992 – Champion
1993 – First Round
1995 – Second Round
1976 – Champion
1977 – Semi-finals
1978 – First Round
1980 – Quarter-finals

Current team[edit]

As of Feb. 20, 2017

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 Nigeria GK Michael Uweru
2 Nigeria Isiaka Rafiu
3 Nigeria Omololu Waheed
5 Nigeria Semiu Abatan
6 Nigeria DF Wasiu Jimoh
7 Nigeria Sunday Faleye
8 Nigeria FW Adebayo Abayomi
9 Nigeria FW Adewale Adigun
10 Nigeria FW Daniel Bode
11 Nigeria MF Tolu Olaifa
12 Nigeria Junior Merenini
13 Nigeria MF Jide Apena
No. Position Player
14 Nigeria FW Kunle Olukokun
15 Nigeria GK Abubakar Adamu
16 Nigeria Ebitimi Agogu
17 Nigeria DF Alaba Osawe
18 Nigeria DF Samuel Olabisi
19 Nigeria DF Sodiq Suraj
20 Nigeria MF Bola Lekan
22 Nigeria James Moses
24 Nigeria DF Junior Abayomi
26 Nigeria DF Promise Obiaku
27 Nigeria Seun Akinyemi
30 Nigeria GK Charles Tampe
33 Nigeria MF Ibrahim Babalola

Notable Coaches[edit]

  • England Alan Hawkes
  • Franklin Howard
  • Akintola Idowu
  • Yusuf Lati
  • Festus Onigbinde
  • Tayo Oloniyo
  • Siegfried Bahner
  • Jossy Ladipo
  • Fatai Amoo

References[edit]

External links[edit]