Shooting at the 1992 Summer Olympics – Men's 25 metre rapid fire pistol

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Men's 25 metre rapid fire pistol
at the Games of the XXV Olympiad
Romanian stamp commemorating 1992 Olympic shooting
VenueMollet del Vallès
Dates29 July
30 July
Competitors30 from 23 nations
Winning score885 OR
Medalists
1st place, gold medalist(s) Ralf Schumann
 Germany
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Afanasijs Kuzmins
 Latvia
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Vladimir Vokhmyanin
 Unified Team
← 1988
1996 →

The men's ISSF 25 meter rapid fire pistol was one of the thirteen shooting events at the 1992 Summer Olympics. It was the first Olympic rapid fire competition on the new, circular targets, and also the only one in history to feature both a semifinal, consisting of four four-second series for the top eight shooters, and a final, consisting of two additional four-second series for the top four. Afanasijs Kuzmins (for the first time competing for independent Latvia) and Ralf Schumann, who had battled for the gold medal four years earlier, once again clinched the top two spots, although in reversed order. The two were the eighth and ninth men to win multiple medals in the event. Schumann's win was the first victory (and first medal) for unified Germany since 1936, though East Germany (including Schumann himself) had won medals since. Kuzmins earned Latvia's first independent medal (the country had competed in 1936 before being occupied by the Soviet Union). Vladimir Vokhmyanin of the Unified Team finished on the same score as Kuzmins, but a lower final score demoted him to bronze.[1] There were 30 competitors from 23 nations.[2] Nations had been limited to two shooters each since the 1952 Games.

Background

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This was the 19th appearance of what had been standardised in 1948 as the men's ISSF 25 meter rapid fire pistol event, the only event on the 2020 programme that traces back to 1896.[2] The event has been held at every Summer Olympics except 1904 and 1928 (when no shooting events were held) and 1908; it was nominally open to women from 1968 to 1980, although very few women participated these years.[3] The first five events were quite different, with some level of consistency finally beginning with the 1932 event—which, though it had differences from the 1924 competition, was roughly similar. The 1936 competition followed the 1932 one quite closely.[4] The post-World War II event substantially altered the competition once again.[5] The 1984 Games introduced women's-only shooting events, including the ISSF 25 meter pistol (though this is more similar to the non-Olympic men's ISSF 25 meter center-fire pistol than the rapid fire pistol).

Five of the eight finalists from 1988 returned: gold medalist (and 1980 top-10 finisher) Afanasijs Kuzmins of the Soviet Union (now competing for Latvia), silver medalist Ralf Schumann of East Germany (now competing for unified Germany), fifth-place finisher Adam Kaczmarek of Poland, sixth-place finisher Bernardo Tobar of Colombia, and seventh-place finisher John McNally of the United States. Schumann was the reigning (1990) world champion; Miroslav Ignatiuk of the Unified Team had finished second and Petri Eteläniemi of Finland third.

Albania made its debut in the event; twelve former Soviet republics competed together as the Unified Team. The United States made its 16th appearance, most of any nation.

Competition format

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The competition format used a three-round tournament for the only time, using a qualifying round, semifinal, and a final.

The qualifying round from 1988 onward was essentially the same as the full competition format from 1948–1984. Each shooter fired 60 shots. These were done in two courses of 30; each course consisted of two stages of 15; each stage consisted of three series of 5. In each stage, the time limit for each series was 8 seconds for the first, 6 seconds for the second, and 4 seconds for the third.

The 1988 tournament had added a two-series final for the top eight shooters; the 1992 competition broke that down to a four-series semifinal for the top eight and two-series final for the top four.

Eight shooters advanced to the semifinal. There, they shot four series of 5 shots each, all at 4 seconds. The semifinal score was added to the qualifying round score to give the semifinal total. The top four shooters by semifinal total advanced again to the final. There, they shot two more series of 5 shots each, again at 4 seconds, adding that score to their qualifying and semifinal rounds to give a final total. The finalists fired a total of 90 shots across the three rounds, with a maximum score of 900.

The 1992 competition introduced round targets rather than the silhouettes used from 1948 to 1988 as well as many pre-World War II versions of the event. Score, rather than hits, had been used as the primary ranking method since 1960.[2][6]

Records

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The Official Report lists Schumann's 594 in the qualifying round as a new Olympic record, suggesting that the 598 shot by Kuzmins in 1988 was considered a different format (after the change in targets from silhouettes to round targets).[6] The 70-shot qualifying plus final used in 1988 was not used in 1992; the 80-shot qualifying plus final and 90-shot three-round score used in 1992 were not used again.

Qualifying
World record
Olympic record New format

Schedule

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Date Time Round
Wednesday, 29 July 1992 9:00 Qualifying: Course 1
Thursday, 30 July 1992 9:00 Qualifying: Course 2
Semifinal
Final

Results

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Qualifying

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Rank Shooter Nation Course 1 Course 2 Total Notes
1 Ralf Schumann  Germany 299 295 594 Q, OR
2 Adam Kaczmarek  Poland 295 296 591 Q
3 Krzysztof Kucharczyk  Poland 293 297 590 Q
4 Vladimir Vokhmyanin  Unified Team 295 295 590 Q
5 Afanasijs Kuzmins  Latvia 297 293 590 Q
6 John McNally  United States 293 294 587 Q
7 Bernardo Tobar  Colombia 294 293 587 Q
8 Miroslav Ignatiuk  Unified Team 292 294 586 Q
9 Roger Mar  United States 293 293 586
10 Petri Eteläniemi  Finland 292 293 585
11 Meng Gang  China 292 293 585
Pierluigi Ussorio  Italy 291 294 585
13 Iulian Raicea  Romania 290 294 584
Jindřich Skupa  Czechoslovakia 293 291 584
15 René Osthold  Germany 289 294 583
16 Christian Kezel  France 291 291 582
Anton Küchler  Switzerland 293 289 582
Hans-Rudolf Schneider  Switzerland 290 292 582
Juan Segui Picornell  Spain 289 293 582
20 Kim Bong-chol  North Korea 292 289 581
Emil Milev  Bulgaria 291 290 581
22 Katsumasa Onishi  Japan 291 288 579
Lajos Pálinkás  Hungary 284 295 579
24 Ivan Dimitrov  Bulgaria 290 287 577
25 Dimitrios Baltas  Greece 286 289 575
26 Patrick Murray  Australia 290 284 574
27 Nguyễn Quốc Cường  Vietnam 288 285 573
28 Adrian Breton  Great Britain 290 281 571
Sándor Kacskó  Hungary 290 281 571
30 Kristo Robo  Albania 279 286 565

Semifinal

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Rank Shooter Nation Qualifying Semifinal Total Notes
Series 1 Series 2 Series 3 Series 4 Total
1 Ralf Schumann  Germany 594 49 49 49 48 195 789 Q
2 Vladimir Vokhmyanin  Unified Team 590 49 49 49 49 196 786 Q
3 Afanasijs Kuzmins  Latvia 590 48 49 50 48 195 785 Q
4 Krzysztof Kucharczyk  Poland 590 47 47 49 50 193 783 Q
5 John McNally  United States 587 50 48 49 47 194 781
6 Miroslav Ignatiuk  Unified Team 586 48 50 47 48 193 779
7 Adam Kaczmarek  Poland 591 48 45 48 46 187 778
8 Bernardo Tobar  Colombia 587 47 48 46 48 189 776

Final

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Kuzmins prevailed over Vokhmyanin due to the final scores tie-breaker (97 to 96).

Rank Shooter Nation Qualifying Semifinal Subtotal Final Total
1st place, gold medalist(s) Ralf Schumann  Germany 594 195 789 96 885
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Afanasijs Kuzmins  Latvia 590 195 785 97 882
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Vladimir Vokhmyanin  Unified Team 590 196 786 96 882
4 Krzysztof Kucharczyk  Poland 590 193 783 97 880

References

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  1. ^ "Shooting at the 1992 Barcelona Summer Games: Men's Rapid-Fire Pistol, 25 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 18 April 2020. Retrieved 24 February 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "Rapid-Fire Pistol, 25 metres, Men's". Olympedia. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  3. ^ "Muzzle-Loading Pistol, 25 metres, Men (1896)". Olympedia. Retrieved 11 December 2020.
  4. ^ "Rapid-Fire Pistol, 25 metres, Men (1936)". Olympedia. Retrieved 11 December 2020.
  5. ^ "Rapid-Fire Pistol, 25 metres, Men (1948)". Olympedia. Retrieved 11 December 2020.
  6. ^ a b Official Report, vol. 5, p. 338.

Sources

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