Shooting at the 2016 Summer Olympics

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Shooting
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Shooting, Rio 2016.png
VenueNational Shooting Center
Dates6–14 August
No. of events15
Competitors390
← 2012
2020 →

Shooting competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro took place from 6 to 14 August at the National Shooting Center in Deodoro.[1] A maximum of 390 athletes were able to compete in the fifteen events across these Games. The event format was similar to 2012, although there were significant changes to the rules and guidelines of the competition.

Format changes[edit]

On 23 November 2012, the International Shooting Sport Federation instituted new rules to the competition format designed to enhance the sport's appeal to youth, to make it more spectator and media friendly, and to keep the competitions fair and transparent. The most significant change to the rules was the new final format for all Olympic events, where all finalists must start from scratch. Furthermore, all finals featured an elimination stage, until the competition ended up with duels between the two shooters to decide the gold and silver medals. Other ratified changes included decimal scoring for both air rifle and rifle prone, separate sighting and match firing periods, limited use of performance-enhancing rifle clothing and equipment, target throwing distance in skeet shooting, and adjustment of targets in the double trap.[2]

Qualification[edit]

The qualification system was similar to that used for previous Games, with a fixed number of quota places divided among the nations whose shooters place well at top-level global and continental championships. As per the guidelines from the International Shooting Sport Federation, qualification commenced with the 2014 ISSF World Shooting Championships in Granada, Spain, which concluded on 19 September 2014, two years before the Olympics.[3][4] Throughout the process, quota places were generally awarded when a shooter earns a gold medal in an ISSF World Cup series or posts a top finish at the ISSF World Championships or the continental championships (Africa, Europe, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas).

Brazil did not qualify through the World Championships, rather its nine places were guaranteed due to it being the host nation.[5]

Competition schedule[edit]

Q Qualification F Final
Event↓/Date → Sat 6 Sun 7 Mon 8 Tue 9 Wed 10 Thu 11 Fri 12 Sat 13 Sun 14
Rifle
Men's 10 m air rifle Q F
Men's 50 m rifle prone Q F
Men's 50 m rifle 3 positions Q F
Women's 10 m air rifle Q F
Women's 50 m rifle 3 positions Q F
Pistol
Men's 10 m air pistol Q F
Men's 25 m rapid fire pistol Q F
Men's 50 m pistol Q F
Women's 10 m air pistol Q F
Women's 25 m pistol Q F
Shotgun
Men's trap Q F
Men's double trap Q F
Men's skeet Q F
Women's trap Q F
Women's skeet Q F


Participation[edit]

Participating nations[edit]

Competitors[edit]

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Key

  *   Host nation (Brazil)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Italy4307
2 Germany3104
3 China1247
4 South Korea1102
 Vietnam1102
6 United States1023
7 Greece1012
 Independent Olympic Athletes1012
9 Australia1001
 Croatia1001
11 Russia0224
12 France0112
13 Brazil*0101
 New Zealand0101
 Sweden0101
 Ukraine0101
17 Great Britain0022
18 North Korea0011
 Switzerland0011
Totals (19 nations)15151545

Men's events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
10 meter air pistol
details
Hoàng Xuân Vinh
 Vietnam OR
Felipe Almeida Wu
 Brazil
Pang Wei
 China
25 meter rapid fire pistol
details
Christian Reitz
 Germany
Jean Quiquampoix
 France
Li Yuehong
 China
50 meter pistol
details
Jin Jong-oh
 South Korea OR
Hoàng Xuân Vinh
 Vietnam
Kim Song-guk
 North Korea
10 meter air rifle
details
Niccolò Campriani
 Italy OR
Serhiy Kulish
 Ukraine
Vladimir Maslennikov
 Russia
50 meter rifle prone
details
Henri Junghänel
 Germany OR
Kim Jong-hyun
 South Korea
Kirill Grigoryan
 Russia
50 meter rifle three positions
details
Niccolò Campriani
 Italy OR
Sergey Kamenskiy
 Russia
Alexis Raynaud
 France
Skeet
details
Gabriele Rossetti
 Italy
Marcus Svensson
 Sweden
Abdullah Al-Rashidi
 Independent Olympic Athletes
Trap
details
Josip Glasnović
 Croatia
Giovanni Pellielo
 Italy
Edward Ling
 Great Britain
Double trap
details
Fehaid Al-Deehani
 Independent Olympic Athletes
Marco Innocenti
 Italy
Steven Scott
 Great Britain

Women's events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
10 meter air pistol
details
Zhang Mengxue
 China OR
Vitalina Batsarashkina
 Russia
Anna Korakaki
 Greece
25 meter pistol
details
Anna Korakaki
 Greece
Monika Karsch
 Germany
Heidi Diethelm Gerber
 Switzerland
10 meter air rifle
details
Virginia Thrasher
 United States OR
Du Li
 China
Yi Siling
 China
50 meter rifle three positions
details
Barbara Engleder
 Germany
Zhang Binbin
 China
Du Li
 China
Skeet
details
Diana Bacosi
 Italy
Chiara Cainero
 Italy
Kim Rhode
 United States
Trap
details
Catherine Skinner
 Australia
Natalie Rooney
 New Zealand
Corey Cogdell
 United States

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Shooting". Rio 2016. 2014. Archived from the original on 10 September 2014. Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  2. ^ "New ISSF 2013-2016 Rules: competitions will start from zero, and end in a duel". International Shooting Sport Federation. 23 November 2012. Retrieved 13 August 2015.
  3. ^ "The road to Rio 2016 starts from Spain: 51st ISSF World Championship presented in Granada". International Shooting Sport Federation. 3 June 2014. Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  4. ^ "Rio 2016 Quota Places: the distribution rules". International Shooting Sport Federation. 2 May 2014. Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  5. ^ "Olympic Quota Places". International Shooting Sport Federation. Retrieved 9 September 2014.

External links[edit]