Shooting at the 2020 Summer Olympics

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Shooting
at the Games of the XXXII Olympiad
VenueAsaka Shooting Range
Dates24 July – 2 August 2021
No. of events15
Competitors360 (180 men and 180 women)
← 2016
2024 →

Shooting competitions at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo were originally scheduled from 25 July to 3 August 2020, due to the postponement of the Summer Olympics to 2021, the rescheduled dates will be on 24 July to 2 August 2021 at the Asaka Shooting Range.[1] Unlike in 2016, the number of shooters competing across fifteen different events at these Games has been reduced from 390 to 360, with an equal distribution between men and women. Furthermore, several significant changes were instituted in the Olympic shooting program, including the substitution of three male-only events (rifle prone, free pistol, and double trap), with the mixed team competitions.[2] All dates referenced will be rescheduled due to postponement of Olympics until 2021.[3]

Competition format[edit]

On 9 June 2017, the International Shooting Sport Federation welcomed the decision of the International Olympic Committee to approve the changes of the Olympic shooting program to achieve gender equality and to enhance the sport's popularity and worldwide appeal.[2] One of the significant changes in the program was to replace the three men-only events, namely 50 m rifle prone, 50 m pistol, and double trap, with the mixed team competitions (rifle, pistol, and trap), which were highly encouraged as a means of ensuring gender equality. Other ratified changes included the same number of shots for both men and women, and the progressive elimination finals for both the women's sport pistol and the shotgun events.[4]

Similar to 2016 format, all shooters advanced to the Olympic finals of their individual events must start from scratch and compete against each other in a series of elimination rounds. The stage continues until the competition leaves with only two shooters battling out in a duel to decide the gold and silver medals.[5]

Qualification[edit]

In February 2018, the International Shooting Sport Federation has agreed to change the rules on the allocation of the Olympic quota places, as it aims to attain gender equality. As a result, a total of 360 quota places, an equal distribution between men and women, will be awarded at the top-level global and continental championships.

As per the guidelines from the International Shooting Sport Federation, qualification period commences with the 2018 ISSF World Shooting Championships in Changwon, South Korea, which concludes on 15 September 2018, less than two years before the Olympics. There, forty-eight individual and twelve mixed team quota places will be assigned.[6][7] Throughout the process, quota places will be generally awarded when a shooter earns a gold medal in an ISSF World Cup series or posts a top finish at the ISSF World Championships or the continental championships (Africa, Europe, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas).

After the qualification period concludes and all NOCs receive the official list of quota places, the ISSF will check the World Ranking list in each of the individual shooting events. The highest-ranked shooter, who has not qualified in any event and whose NOC does not have a berth in a specific event, will obtain a direct Olympic quota place.[8]

Unlike the previous Games, host nation Japan is guaranteed twelve quota places, with one in each of the individual shooting events.[9]

Schedule[edit]

Legend
Q Qualification F Final

[10][11]

Event↓/Date → Sat 24 Sun 25 Mon 26 Tue 27 Wed 28 Thu 29 Fri 30 Sat 31 Sun 1 Mon 2
Rifle
Men's 10 m air rifle Q F
Men's 50 m rifle 3 positions Q F
Women's 10 m air rifle Q F
Women's 50 m rifle 3 positions Q F
Mixed 10 m air rifle team Q F
Pistol
Men's 10 m air pistol Q F
Men's 25 m rapid fire pistol Q F
Women's 10 m air pistol Q F
Women's 25 m pistol Q F
Mixed 10 m air pistol team Q F
Shotgun
Men's trap Q F
Men's skeet Q F
Women's trap Q F
Women's skeet Q F
Mixed trap team Q F

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Men's events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
10 metre air pistol
details
25 metre rapid fire pistol
details
10 metre air rifle
details
50 metre rifle three positions
details
Skeet
details
Trap
details

Women's events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
10 metre air pistol
details
25 metre pistol
details
10 metre air rifle
details
50 metre rifle three positions
details
Skeet
details
Trap
details

Mixed team events[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Mixed air pistol team
details
Mixed air rifle team
details
Mixed trap team
details

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Shooting". Tokyo 2020. Retrieved 25 March 2018.
  2. ^ a b "ISSF Welcomes IOC Decisions Regarding Tokyo 2020 Sports Program". International Shooting Sport Federation. 9 June 2017. Retrieved 25 March 2018.
  3. ^ https://www.espn.com/olympics/story/_/id/28946033/tokyo-olympics-officially-postponed-2021
  4. ^ "ISSF Rules Changes for 2018-2020 approved". International Shooting Sport Federation. 18 December 2017. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  5. ^ "New ISSF 2013-2016 Rules: competitions will start from zero, and end in a duel". International Shooting Sport Federation. 23 November 2012. Retrieved 13 August 2015.
  6. ^ "Tokyo 2020: Quota Rules approved, 60 quotas in Changwon". International Shooting Sport Federation. 20 March 2018. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  7. ^ Morgan, Liam (21 March 2018). "ISSF confirm IOC approval of quota qualification rules for Tokyo 2020". Inside the Games. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  8. ^ "Qualification System – Games of the XXXII Olympiad – Shooting" (PDF). International Shooting Sport Federation. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  9. ^ "Olympic Quota Places". International Shooting Sport Federation. Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  10. ^ "Schedule - Shooting Tokyo 2020 Olympics". Olympian Database. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  11. ^ "Shooting Competition Schedule". Tokyo 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2020.