Short Change

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Short Change
Genre Consumer affairs
Presented by Zoë Ball (1994–1995)
Andi Peters (1996)
Tim Vincent (1997–1999)
Ortis Deley (1999–2005)
Rhodri Owen (2000–2005)
Angellica Bell (2001–2004)
Thalia Pellegrini (2005)
Country of origin United Kingdom
No. of series 13
No. of episodes 139
Release
Original network BBC One
CBBC
Original release 20 February 1994 (1994-02-20) – 9 July 2005 (2005-07-09)

Short Change was a consumer affairs programme for children, broadcast on BBC One and later also the CBBC Channel. It was essentially a version of the prime-time show Watchdog except that it was aimed at children. The show was first aired on 20 February 1994. It had 13 series; the last episode was broadcast on 9 July 2005.

Transmission guide[edit]

Series Episodes Duration Presenter(s)
1 6 20 February 1994 – 27 March 1994 Zoë Ball
2 19 February 1995 – 26 March 1995
3 7 18 February 1996 – 31 March 1996 Andi Peters
4 8 9 February 1997 – 30 March 1997 Tim Vincent
5 6 11 January 1998 – 15 February 1998
6 12 7 January 1999 – 25 March 1999 Tim Vincent & Ortis Deley
7 6 January 2000 – 23 March 2000 Ortis Deley & Rhodri Owen
8 4 January 2001 – 22 March 2001 Ortis Deley, Rhodri Owen & Angellica Bell
9 14 29 March 2001 – 28 June 2001
10 13 18 April 2002 – 11 July 2002
11 24 April 2003 – 17 July 2003
12 15 8 April 2004 – 15 July 2004
13 2 April 2005 – 9 July 2005 Ortis Deley, Rhodri Owen and Thalia Pellegrini

Specials

  • Series 3 compilation: 5 January 1997
  • Fan Clubs Special: 9 November 1997
  • The Fat Nation Challenge: 18 editions from 9 September 2004 – 7 November 2004

PriceBusters Competition[edit]

On each programme, viewers were challenged to find the cheapest and most expensive prices for a given product, across the country. Two winners each week (one finding each extreme price) would win a boom-box stereo. Bill Bennett won the competition two weeks running, by finding the most expensive prices for the given products, and including Tesco.com's grocery delivery charge of £5. This made the cost of a Mullerice around £5.40, much more expensive than prices found by any other entrant. After his two consecutive wins, the rules were changed to specifically exclude delivery charges.

References[edit]

  • Source: BFI/BBC Motion Gallery

See also[edit]