Shrewsbury, New Jersey

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Shrewsbury, New Jersey
Borough of Shrewsbury
Map of Shrewsbury in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Shrewsbury in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Shrewsbury, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Shrewsbury, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°19′30″N 74°3′36″W / 40.32500°N 74.06000°W / 40.32500; -74.06000Coordinates: 40°19′30″N 74°3′36″W / 40.32500°N 74.06000°W / 40.32500; -74.06000[1]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMonmouth
IncorporatedMay 11, 1926
Named forShrewsbury, England
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorErik Anderson (R, term ends December 31, 2022)[2][3]
 • AdministratorChristopher Cherbini[4]
 • Municipal clerkKerry Quinn [5]
Area
 • Total2.19 sq mi (5.67 km2)
 • Land2.16 sq mi (5.60 km2)
 • Water0.03 sq mi (0.07 km2)  1.32%
Area rank395th of 565 in state
27th of 53 in county[7]
Elevation46 ft (14 m)
Population
 • Total3,809
 • Estimate 
(2019)[11]
4,053
 • Rank423rd of 566 in state
38th of 53 in county[12]
 • Density1,757.2/sq mi (678.5/km2)
 • Density rank307th of 566 in state
38th of 53 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)732[15]
FIPS code3402567350[7][16][17]
GNIS feature ID885395[1][7]
Websitewww.shrewsburyboro.com

Shrewsbury is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 3,809,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 219 (+6.1%) from the 3,590 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 494 (+16.0%) from the 3,096 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Shrewsbury was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 22, 1926, from portions of Shrewsbury Township, based on the results of a referendum held on May 11, 1926.[19] The borough's name comes from Shrewsbury, England.[20]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.19 square miles (5.67 km2), including 2.16 square miles (5.60 km2) of land and 0.03 square miles (0.07 km2) of water (1.32%).[7]

The borough borders the Monmouth County municipalities of Eatontown, Little Silver, Oceanport, Red Bank, Shrewsbury Township and Tinton Falls.[21][22][23]

Shrewsbury Borough prior to 1926 was a part of Shrewsbury Township, which had originally encompassed most of Monmouth and Ocean County, New Jersey counties, including several of the other municipalities nearby, until finally shrinking down to under one square mile.[19][24]

Demographics[edit]

Route 35 is a main commercial thoroughfare for the borough.
Historical population
Census Pop.
1930857
19401,05823.5%
19501,61352.5%
19603,22299.8%
19703,3152.9%
19802,962−10.6%
19903,0964.5%
20003,59016.0%
20103,8096.1%
2019 (est.)4,053[11][25]6.4%
Population sources: 1930[26]
1930–1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 3,809 people, 1,261 households, and 1,026 families in the borough. The population density was 1,757.2 per square mile (678.5/km2). There were 1,310 housing units at an average density of 604.4 per square mile (233.4/km2). The racial makeup was 95.62% (3,642) White, 0.66% (25) Black or African American, 0.11% (4) Native American, 2.13% (81) Asian, 0.03% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.58% (22) from other races, and 0.89% (34) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.49% (95) of the population.[8]

Of the 1,261 households, 40.7% had children under the age of 18; 71.5% were married couples living together; 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present and 18.6% were non-families. Of all households, 16.5% were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.24.[8]

27.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 19.2% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.3 years. For every 100 females, the population had 87.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 84.7 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $111,648 (with a margin of error of +/- $15,595) and the median family income was $124,091 (+/- $10,340). Males had a median income of $111,645 (+/- $13,085) versus $54,313 (+/- $9,453) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $47,698 (+/- $5,936). About none of families and 1.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Census 2000[edit]

Restaurant in mall along Route 35.

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 3,590 people, 1,207 households, and 1,016 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,627.1 people per square mile (627.2/km2). There were 1,223 housing units at an average density of 554.3 per square mile (213.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.60% White, 0.53% African American, 1.67% Asian, 0.36% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.92% of the population.[28][29]

There were 1,207 households, out of which 46.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.6% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 15.8% were non-families. 12.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.27.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 30.8% under the age of 18, 4.0% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.2 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $86,911, and the median income for a family was $92,719. Males had a median income of $85,875 versus $37,554 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,218. None of the families and 1.0% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under 18 and 3.0% of those over 64.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Municipal building.
Public park near the borough hall.

Local government[edit]

Shrewsbury is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 565) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[31] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Shrewsbury is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[32][33]

As of 2020, the mayor of Shrewsbury Borough is Republican Erik Anderson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2022. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Kimberly Doran Eulner (R, 2023), Deidre M. DerAsadourian (R, 2022), Donald J. Eddy (R, 2021), Jason Sena (R, 2022), Jeff DeSalvo (R, 2021) and Brendan Gilmartin (R, 2023).[2][34][35][36][37][38]

In February 2016, the Borough Council selected Erik Anderson to fill the seat expiring in December 2017 that had been held by William E. Dodge until his resignation earlier that month.[39][40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Shrewsbury Borough is located in the 4th Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 11th state legislative district.[9][42][43] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Shrewsbury Borough had been in the 12th state legislative district.[44] Prior to the 2010 Census, Shrewsbury Borough had been part of the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[44]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Chris Smith (R, Hamilton Township).[45][46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[47] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[48][49]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 11th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the New Jersey Senate by Vin Gopal (D, Long Branch) and in in the General Assembly by Kimberly Eulner (R, Shrewsbury) and Marilyn Piperno (R, Colts Neck Township).[50]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[51] As of 2020, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2022; term as freeholder director ends 2021),[52] Freeholder Deputy Director Susan M. Kiley (R, Hazlet Township, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2021; term as deputy freeholder director ends 2021),[53] Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township, 2020),[54] Nick DiRocco (R, Wall Township, 2022),[55] and Patrick G. Impreveduto (R, Holmdel Township, 2020)[56].

Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon (R, 2020; Ocean Township),[57][58] Sheriff Shaun Golden (R, 2022; Howell Township),[59][60] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (R, 2021; Middletown Township).[61][62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,844 registered voters in Shrewsbury, of which 650 (22.9%) were registered as Democrats, 863 (30.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,330 (46.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There as one voter registered to another party.[63]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 57.2% of the vote (1,205 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 41.6% (876 votes), and other candidates with 1.3% (27 votes), among the 2,120 ballots cast by the borough's 2,935 registered voters (12 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 72.2%.[64][65] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 54.5% of the vote (1,248 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 42.8% (980 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (30 votes), among the 2,291 ballots cast by the borough's 2,944 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.8%.[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 58.9% of the vote (1,305 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 40.2% (891 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (18 votes), among the 2,217 ballots cast by the township's 2,834 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 78.2.[67]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 72.5% of the vote (955 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 26.4% (348 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (14 votes), among the 1,330 ballots cast by the borough's 3,000 registered voters (13 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 44.3%.[68][69] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 65.3% of the vote (1,063 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 24.8% (404 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.3% (135 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (14 votes), among the 1,628 ballots cast by the borough's 2,885 registered voters, yielding a 56.4% turnout.[70]

Historic district[edit]

Shrewsbury Historic District
Episcopalian church in Shrewsbury New Jersey on Route 35.jpg
Christ Church along Route 35
LocationBroad and Sycamore Streets
Area85 acres (34 ha)
Architectural styleQueen Anne, Dutch Colonial
NRHP reference No.78001779[71]
NJRHP No.2055[72]
Significant dates
Added to NRHPJuly 17, 1978
Designated NJRHPMay 7, 1976

The Shrewsbury Historic District is a historic district located along Broad and Sycamore Streets. The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 17, 1978, for its significance in architecture and religion. Three churches, the Allen House, and the Wardell House are among its 47 contributing buildings.[73]

Education[edit]

The Monmouth County Library is in Shrewsbury.

The Shrewsbury Borough School District serves public school students ranging from pre-kindergarten through eighth grade at the Shrewsbury Borough School.[74][75] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of one school, had an enrollment of 479 students and 50.3 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.5:1.[76] The school features three homerooms per grade, with special classes that include physical education, art, music, computers, and for language, Spanish.

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Red Bank Regional High School, which serves students from the boroughs of Little Silver, Red Bank and Shrewsbury, along with students in the district's academy programs from other communities who are eligible to attend on a tuition basis.[77][78] Students from other Monmouth County municipalities are eligible to attend the high school for its performing arts program, with admission on a competitive basis.[79] The borough has two elected representatives on the nine-member Board of Education.[80] As of the 2018–19 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,208 students and 119.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.1:1.[81]

Private school options include Christian Brothers Academy or Red Bank Catholic High School, the local Catholic schools, operated by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton.[82]

Transportation[edit]

Route 35 in Shrewsbury

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 21.50 miles (34.60 km) of roadways, of which 16.88 miles (27.17 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.75 miles (4.43 km) by Monmouth County and 1.87 miles (3.01 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[83]

Route 35 is the main north–south road in Shrewsbury, while CR 520 is oriented east–west along the northern border.[84][85]

The Garden State Parkway is accessible in neighboring Tinton Falls or via CR 520 in Middletown.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit offers train service on the North Jersey Coast Line at the Little Silver station. NJ Transit local bus service is available on the 831 and 832 routes.[86]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Shrewsbury include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Borough of Shrewsbury". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  2. ^ a b Mayor & Council, Borough of Shrewsbury. Accessed March 5, 2020.
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  4. ^ Administration, Borough of Shrewsbury. Accessed January 19, 2021.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk, Borough of Shrewsbury. Accessed March 16, 2021.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 63.
  7. ^ a b c d e 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
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  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 – Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed August 1, 2012.
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  74. ^ Shrewsbury Board of Education District Policy 0110 - Identification, Shrewsbury Borough School District. Accessed June 14, 2020. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Pre-Kindergarten through eight in the Shrewsbury Borough School District. Composition: The Shrewsbury Borough School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of the Borough of Shrewsbury."
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  77. ^ Red Bank Regional High School 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 30, 2017. "Red Bank Regional High School is a comprehensive and diverse secondary school that offers a multitude of rigorous academic and extra-curricular programs for the student body which numbers 1,236. The constituent sending districts include Little Silver, Red Bank Borough and Shrewsbury. The district also accepts students on a tuition basis who may be interested in one of our specialized academies of study."
  78. ^ Martin, Patti. "A Day in the Life of Red Bank Regional High School", Asbury Park Press, March 30, 2007. Accessed September 1, 2014. "Located in Little Silver, RBR, as the school is commonly referred to, is the home school to students from Little Silver, Red Bank and Shrewsbury."
  79. ^ Academy of Visual and Performing Arts Frequently Asked Questions Archived October 19, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, Red Bank Regional High School. Accessed September 1, 2014.
  80. ^ About the Board of Education, Red Bank Regional High School District. Accessed January 21, 2017. "The Board of Education is composed of nine citizens elected from our constituent districts. Representatives are elected on the basis of constituent population - two from Little Silver, five from Red Bank, and two from Shrewsbury."
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