Shui Hua

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Shui Hua
Chinese name 水華 (traditional)
Chinese name 水华 (simplified)
Pinyin Shǔi Huà (Mandarin)
Birth name Zhang Yufan
Born (1916-11-23)November 23, 1916
Nanjing, China
Died December 16, 1995(1995-12-16) (aged 79)
Occupation Film director, Screenwriter
Years active 1950s-1960s; 1980s

Shui Hua (simplified Chinese: 水华; traditional Chinese: 水華) (November 23, 1916 – December 16, 1995), born Zhang Yufan,[1] was a Chinese film director who gained prominence in the 1950s in the early years of the People's Republic of China.

Career[edit]

Born in Nanjing in 1916, Shui Hua studied to be an attorney at Fudan University in Shanghai.[1] During the Second Sino-Japanese War, Shui made his way to the Yan'an where he became a member of the Communist Party of China.[1] After the war, Shui became involved in theater while teaching eventually moving into filmmaking with his 1950 debut film, The White Haired Girl.[1] Later in the decade, he directed the critically acclaimed The Lin Family Shop, based on a short story by the author Mao Dun.[1]

With the turmoil of the 1960s and 1970s, Shui's filmmaking days seemed behind him. However, upon China's re-emergence from the Cultural Revolution, Shui again began to direct films, including Regret for the Past (1981), based on a story by Lu Xun, Blue Flowers (1984).

Filmography[edit]

Year English Title Chinese Title Notes
1950 The White Haired Girl 白毛女 Co-directed with Wang Bin
1959 The Lin Family Shop 林家铺子 Based on the short story by Mao Dun
1960 A Revolutionary Family 革命家庭 Best Screenplay at the Hundred Flowers Awards
Entered into the 2nd Moscow International Film Festival.[2]
1965 Living Forever in Burning Flames 烈火中永生
1981 Regret for the Past 伤逝 Based on the short story by Lu Xun
1984 Blue Flowers 蓝色的花

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Zhang, Yingjin & Xiao, Zhiwei (1998). "Shui Hua" in Encyclopedia of Chinese Film. Taylor & Francis, p. 305. ISBN 0-415-15168-6.
  2. ^ "2nd Moscow International Film Festival (1961)". MIFF. Retrieved 2012-11-15. 

External links[edit]