Shulamite

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Gustave Moreau, Song of Songs: The Shulammite Maiden (white washed painting)

A Shulamite is a person from Shulem. It is the ascription given to the female protagonist in the Song of Songs in the Hebrew Bible. In the King James Version and other Bibles, it is the Song of Solomon or Canticle of Canticles.

Background[edit]

She is most likely called the Shulammite because she came from an unidentified place called Shulem. Many scholars consider Shulammite to be synonymous with Shunammite (“person from Shunem”). Shunem was a village in the territory of Issachar, north of Jezreel and south of Mount Gilboa. Other scholars link Shulem with Salem, believing Solomon’s bride was from Jerusalem. Still others believe that the title Shulammite (“peaceful”) is simply the bride’s married name, being the feminine form of Solomon (“peaceful”) and only used after her marriage to the king.

Solomon uses passionate language to describe his bride and their love (Song 4:1–15). Solomon clearly loved the Shulammite—and he admired her character as well as her beauty (Song 6:9). Everything about the Song of Solomon portrays the fact that this bride and groom were passionately in love and that there was mutual respect and friendship, as well (Song 8:6–7).

Shulamite in culture[edit]

Art[edit]

Fictional entities[edit]

Shunammite is a fictional character in Gilead, in Margaret Atwood's sequel to The Handmaid's Tale, titled The Testaments (2019).

See also[edit]

References[edit]