Shulamith School for Girls

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Shulamith School for Girls
Address
305 Cedarhurst Ave., Cedarhurst
New York
USA
Information
Type Private, Jewish day school
Religious affiliation(s) Judaism
Denomination Modern Orthodox
Established 1930
Executive Director Rabbi Perry Tirschwell, [MA]
Principals Estee Scher (Early Childhood)
Joyce Yarmak (Lower Division)
Rookie Billet & Associate Principal Dr. Evelyn Gross (Middle Division)
Rina Zerykier (High School)
Grades PK12
Gender Girls
Athletics conference MYHSAL
Mascot Mustangs
Accreditation MSA[1]
Website

Shulamith School for Girls is a centrist Orthodox Jewish school. It was the first Orthodox Jewish elementary school for girls in North America.[2] The name Shulamith (Hebrew: שולמית‎‎) is a feminine form of the Hebrew name Solomon, which loosely translates to "peace".

History[edit]

The school was founded in 1930 by Bertha Blazer, together with Rabbi M.G. Volk at 4910 14th Avenue in Borough Park, Brooklyn.[3] From 1941, Dr. Judith Lieberman served as Hebrew principal and later as dean of Hebrew studies. Shulamith moved to 1277 East 14th Street in Midwood which originally housed Vitagraph Studios.[4]

In July 2010, Shulamith was divided into two schools: the Shulamith School for Girls (on Long Island), and the Shulamith School of Brooklyn. Each has its own board, administration, and finances.

The four divisions of Shulamith service 575 students- Early Childhood in Woodmere (Principal Estee Scher), Lower Division Grades 1-4 (Principal Joyce Yarmak), Middle Division (principal Rookie Billet, Associate Principal Dr. Evelyn Gross) and High School (principal Rina Zerkykier).

Shulamith of Brooklyn serves students from preschool through twelfth grade. The high school was founded in 1980 with Dr. Susan Katz serving as principal. She retired in 2007. Over the years the high school has received numerous outstanding academic achievements. Shulamith High School was recognized with the Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence by the United States Department of Education.[5] The high school is Middle States Accredited.

Under the leadership of the new Board of Directors and Menahel (Chairman) Rabbi Shmuel Klammer, the Shulamith School of Brooklyn began to flourish once again, with near-record enrollment in the Pre-School program.[citation needed]

Post graduation, students have pursued professional careers in law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, business, and others. Graduates pursued their advanced education at some of the most recognized universities across the nation including Harvard, Columbia, Cornell, Princeton, Yale, New York University, Yeshiva University, SUNY colleges, CUNY colleges, etc. Most graduates spend a year studying in Israel.

Facilities[edit]

The Long Island school has taken over the #5 School from the Lawrence Cedarhurst School District. This school is centrally located in the 5 Towns and boasts a 400-seat fixed seating auditorium, gym, 30 oversized classrooms, and ample outdoor playgrounds.

Shulamith of Brooklyn at 1277 East 14th Street in Midwood for decades, is currently located on two full floors of The Manhattan Beach Jewish Center at 60 West End Avenue. The pre-school is housed in three ultra-modern fully equipped classroom modules adjacent to the main building. There is a full gym for physical education and team sports, and the synagogue sanctuary is used for plays and assemblies.

Educational philosophy[edit]

Classes at Shulamith of Brooklyn are conducted Ivrit b'Ivrit. Shulamith schools focus intensely on textual learning and skill development in Judaic studies such as Navi, Halacha, Mishnah, Ketuvim, and Chumash. It's important for the girls to be able to open a Tanach and learn independently. In addition, Shulamith is unabashedly Zionist in its orientation. Girls are provided with the educational, social, and emotional tools needed to succeed on any path.

The general studies program covers all the basics of the NY State curriculum plus advanced computer skills, STEM programs including robotics, and many other opportunities for the girls to excel in a competitive environment.

Graduates attend prestigious universities and at the same time walk out with the proper morals and ethics of Judaism.

Extracurricular activities[edit]

Shulamith participates in the Salute to Israel Parade and the International Bible Contest (Chidon HaTanach). They also have a school bowl team called the "Torah Bowl" and compete with other (Yeshivot) schools in the NY area. Shulamith School for Girls also stages annual music, dance, and drama productions.

The student newspaper, the Kaleidoscope, won the Columbia Scholastic Press Association Silver Crown in 1995.[6] The student literary magazine Serendipity won the National Scholastic Press Association Gold Circle Award for Humor in 1997.[7] Students may attend the Bais Yaakov Convention. Shulamith also competes in an all-Yeshiva league in basketball, volleyball and softball. The Shulamith mock trial team, which has victoriously won countless competitions, was first instituted in 1999 by Michelle Hagler (now a NYS admitted attorney) and Yocheved Kleinbart. The high school division offer other extracurricular activities including the Math Team, the Math Magazine, the National Honor Society, the Student Body President Committee, Model Congress, yearbook, the Debate Team, and a weekly foreign language newspaper called Sidra. Students participating in the extracurricular activities have won countless awards, championships, medals, and trophies.

Athletics[edit]

The Shulamith Cyclones and Dynamites compete in the Metropolitan Yeshiva High School Athletic League (MYHSAL) "B" Division. In 2016, the Brooklyn school;'s high school volleyball team won the MYHSDAL championship.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Middle States Accreditation listing
  2. ^ Jewish Women's Archive on Nacha Rivkin
  3. ^ Shulamith Institute for Girls of Borough Park Graduation Number, 1936
  4. ^ The Vitaphone Project
  5. ^ Blue Ribbon Schools Program - Schools Recognized 1982-1983 Through 1999-2002
  6. ^ Columbia Scholastic Press Association 1995
  7. ^ Columbia Scholastic Press Association 1997

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°37′6.4″N 73°57′39.5″W / 40.618444°N 73.960972°W / 40.618444; -73.960972