Shunsuke Kikuchi

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In this Japanese name, the family name is Kikuchi.
Shunsuke Kikuchi
Native name 菊池 俊輔
Born (1931-11-01) November 1, 1931 (age 84)
Hirosaki, Aomori, Japan
Alma mater Nihon University College of Art
Occupation Composer and arranger
Years active 1961-

Shunsuke Kikuchi (菊池 俊輔 Kikuchi Shunsuke?, born November 1, 1931) is a prolific Japanese composer. He specializes in incidental music for media such as television and film. Active since the early 1960s, he has been one of Japan's most highly demanded film and TV composers, working principally on tokusatsu and anime productions for children, as well as violent action films, jidaigeki and television dramas. His works are comparatively more common in Toei-related productions.

Up-tempo works like those in Kamen Rider and Abarenbō Shōgun form the majority of his works, whilehis slow background music from long-running series have become some of his best-known works. As anime and tokusatsu like Doraemon Kamen Rider Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, jidaigeki such as Abarenbō Shōgun and Chōshichirō Edo Nikki, and TBS Saturday-night productions ranging from Key Hunter to G-Men '75 became long-running hit series, people began to say that "if Kikuchi Shunsuke is in charge of the music, the show will be a hit." He retired after Dragon Ball Z ended in 1996 is replaced by Akihito Tokunaga as the new composer for Dragon Ball GT.

The song "Urami Bushi" (怨み節?) which he composed for the Female Convict Scorpion series was included in the American film Kill Bill and on its soundtrack.

Awards[edit]

Kikuchi was nominated for the Japan Academy Prize for Music in 1983 for his work on The Gate of Youth and To Trap a Kidnapper.

He received an Award of Merit at the 2013 Tokyo Anime Awards.[1]

Kikuchi has won several annual awards from the Japanese Society for Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers based on the royalties he earned from his works. He won the International Award, which is based on foreign income, in 2007 (Dragon Ball Z), 2009 (Doraemon), 2011(Doraemon), and 2015 (Dragon Ball Z). He came in second in overall royalties in 2004 (Dragon Ball Z).[2]

In 2015, he received a lifetime achievement award at the 57th Japan Record Awards.[3]

Selected works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wolf Children, Late Director Noboru Ishiguro Win Tokyo Anime Awards". Anime News Network. 2013-02-21. Retrieved 2015-12-15. 
  2. ^ "Evangelion is #4 in Japanese Music Royalties in Last 30 Years". Anime News Network. 2012-11-05. Retrieved 2015-12-15. 
  3. ^ "『レコ大』司会、2年連続で安住アナ&仲間由紀恵 クマムシに特別賞" (in Japanese). Oricon. 2015-11-20. Retrieved 2015-11-20. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Patten, Fred (2004). Watching anime, reading manga: 25 years of essays and reviews. Stone Bridge Press. ISBN 978-1-880656-92-1. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  5. ^ Thomas, Brian (2003). VideoHound's dragon: Asian action & cult flicks. Visible Ink Press. p. 155. ISBN 978-1-57859-141-1. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  6. ^ Thomas, Brian (2003). VideoHound's dragon: Asian action & cult flicks. Visible Ink Press. p. 200. ISBN 978-1-57859-141-1. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  7. ^ a b Spencer, Kristopher (2008). Film and television scores, 1950-1979: a critical survey by genre. McFarland. p. 212. ISBN 978-0-7864-3682-8. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  8. ^ Harris, Steve (1988). Film, television, and stage music on phonograph records: a discography. McFarland. p. 83. ISBN 978-0-89950-251-9. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  9. ^ Young, R. G. (1 April 2000). The encyclopedia of fantastic film: Ali Baba to Zombies. Hal Leonard Corporation. p. 238. ISBN 978-1-55783-269-6. Retrieved 25 September 2010. 
  10. ^ Thomas, Brian (2003). VideoHound's dragon: Asian action & cult flicks. Visible Ink Press. p. 245. ISBN 978-1-57859-141-1. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  11. ^ Thomas, Brian (2003). VideoHound's dragon: Asian action & cult flicks. Visible Ink Press. p. 59. ISBN 978-1-57859-141-1. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  12. ^ Thomas, Brian (2003). VideoHound's dragon: Asian action & cult flicks. Visible Ink Press. p. 419. ISBN 978-1-57859-141-1. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  13. ^ Thomas, Brian (2003). VideoHound's dragon: Asian action & cult flicks. Visible Ink Press. p. 575. ISBN 978-1-57859-141-1. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  14. ^ Thomas, Brian (2003). VideoHound's dragon: Asian action & cult flicks. Visible Ink Press. p. 609. ISBN 978-1-57859-141-1. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 

External links[edit]