Siberian Turkic languages

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Not to be confused with Siberian Tatar language.
Siberian Turkic
Northeastern Turkic
Geographic
distribution
Siberia
Linguistic classification Turkic
Early form
Subdivisions
  • North
  • South
Glottolog nort2688  (North)[1]
sout2693  (South)[2]

The Siberian Turkic or Northeastern Common Turkic languages are one of six major branches of the Turkic language family. The following table is based upon the classification scheme presented by Lars Johanson. (1998)[3]

Proto-Turkic Common Turkic Northeastern Common Turkic (Siberian) North Siberian
South Siberian Sayan Turkic
Yenisei Turkic
Chulym Turkic
Altai Turkic[9]
  • Altay Oirot and dialects such as Tuba, Qumanda, Qu, Teleut, Telengit

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "North Siberian Turkic". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "South Siberian Turkic". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  3. ^ Lars Johanson (1998) "The History of Turkic". In Lars Johanson & Éva Ágnes Csató (eds) The Turkic Languages. London, New York: Routledge, 81-125. Classification of Turkic languages at Turkiclanguages.com
  4. ^ Deviating. Probably of South Siberian origin (Johanson 1998)
  5. ^ Coene 2009, p. 75
  6. ^ Coene 2009, p. 75
  7. ^ Concise Encyclopedia of Languages of the World. Contributors Keith Brown, Sarah Ogilvie (revised ed.). Elsevier. 2010. p. 1109. ISBN 0080877753. Retrieved 24 April 2014.  horizontal tab character in |others= at position 13 (help)
  8. ^ Johanson, Lars, ed. (1998). The Mainz Meeting: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Turkish Linguistics, August 3-6, 1994. Turcologica Series. Contributor Éva Ágnes Csató. Otto Harrassowitz Verlag. p. 28. ISBN 3447038640. Retrieved 24 April 2014.  horizontal tab character in |others= at position 12 (help)
  9. ^ Some dialects are close to Kirghiz (Johanson 1998)