Sibley, Iowa

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Sibley, Iowa
City
Location of Sibley, Iowa
Location of Sibley, Iowa
Coordinates: 43°24′11″N 95°44′47″W / 43.40306°N 95.74639°W / 43.40306; -95.74639Coordinates: 43°24′11″N 95°44′47″W / 43.40306°N 95.74639°W / 43.40306; -95.74639
Country  United States
State  Iowa
County Osceola
Area[1]
 • Total 1.68 sq mi (4.35 km2)
 • Land 1.68 sq mi (4.35 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,516 ft (462 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 2,798
 • Estimate (2016)[3] 2,622
 • Density 1,666/sq mi (643.1/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code 51249
Area code(s) 712
FIPS code 19-72975
GNIS feature ID 0461598

Sibley is a city in Osceola County, Iowa, United States. The population was 2,798 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Osceola County.[4] Hawkeye Point, the highest point in the State of Iowa, is also nearby.

History[edit]

Sibley had its start in the year 1872 by the building of the Sioux City & St. Paul Railroad through that territory.[5] It is the oldest town in Osceola County.[6]

Sibley is named after Henry Hastings Sibley, a prominent General during the Dakota War of 1862, who eventually became the first governor of Minnesota.[7][8] William L. Harding, governor of Iowa from 1917 to 1921, was born in Sibley in 1877.

In March 2018, the city of Sibley lost a lawsuit brought against it by the American Civil Liberties Union. Local resident Josh Harms had criticized local officials for failing to stop the "rancid dog food" smell coming from a local pork blood processing plant, which he believed would dissuade people from moving to the town. The city of Sibley threatened to sue him and instructed him not to speak to the media about the issue. The ACLU successfully argued that this violated Harms' First Amendment rights to free speech.[9] An injunction was granted, preventing Sibley's officials from "directing Harms not to speak with reporters, threatening to bring a lawsuit, or actually bringing a lawsuit against" Harms.[10]

In September 2018, the city of Sibley was featured in an Esquire article by Ryan Lizza on dairy farms in the region that employ undocumented immigrants.[11] Dairy farmers and their workers expressed concern that they might be raided by ICE. Indeed, the fear of such a raid was so acute that "[o]ne dairy farmer said . . . that [Western Iowa Dairy Alliance] members have discussed forming a NATO-like pact that would treat a raid on one dairy as a raid on all of them."[12] Lizza's reporting received national attention and has been discussed in regional and national news outlets such as Mother Jones,[13] The Des Moines Register,[14] The Washington Post,[15] The Daily Beast,[16] Bloomberg,[17] and Salon.[18]

Geography[edit]

Sibley is located at 43°24′11″N 95°44′47″W / 43.40306°N 95.74639°W / 43.40306; -95.74639 (43.403046, -95.746471).[19]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.68 square miles (4.35 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880301
18901,090262.1%
19001,28918.3%
19101,3303.2%
19201,80335.6%
19301,8703.7%
19402,35626.0%
19502,5598.6%
19602,85211.4%
19702,749−3.6%
19803,05111.0%
19902,815−7.7%
20002,796−0.7%
20102,7980.1%
Est. 20162,622[3]−6.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[20]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,798 people, 1,153 households, and 724 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,665.5 inhabitants per square mile (643.1/km2). There were 1,269 housing units at an average density of 755.4 per square mile (291.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 99.1% White, 0.3% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.1% Asian, .2% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were .4% of the population.

There were 1,153 households of which 3.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.3% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.2% were non-families. 33.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 95.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 23.33 and the average family size was 21.98.

The median age in the city was 82.8 years. 3.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 1.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 4.6% were from 25 to 44; 25.4% were from 45 to 64; and 97.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 94.6% male and 5.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

At the 2000 census,[21] there were 2,796 people, 1,161 households and 743 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,734.7 per square mile (670.5/km2). There were 1,244 housing units at an average density of 771.8 per square mile (298.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.68% White, 0.21% African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.89% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.22% of the population.

There were 1,161 households of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.8% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.0% were non-families. 33.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.95.

23.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 25.0% from 25 to 44, 20.4% from 45 to 64, and 23.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 83.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.5 males.

The median household income was $33,173 and the median family income was $43,882. Males had a median income of $31,403 compared $21,633 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,845. About 3.6% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.3% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-05-11.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  5. ^ History of Western Iowa, Its Settlement and Growth. Western Publishing Company. 1882. p. 378.
  6. ^ Past and Present of O'Brien and Osceola Counties, Iowa, Volume 1. B. F. Bowen. 1914. p. 593.
  7. ^ Chicago and North Western Railway Company (1908). A History of the Origin of the Place Names Connected with the Chicago & North Western and Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railways. p. 191.
  8. ^ Perkins, D. A. W. (1892). History of Osceola County, Iowa, from Its Organization to the Present Time. Brown & Saenger. p. 214.
  9. ^ Eller, Donnelle (29 March 2018). "Iowa man says his town stinks. Court says city cannot sue". The Des Moines Register. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  10. ^ "US man wins right to say hometown stinks". BBC News. 30 March 2018. Retrieved 23 June 2018.
  11. ^ "Devin Nunes's Family Farm Is Hiding a Politically Explosive Secret". Esquire. 2018-09-30. Retrieved 2018-10-01.
  12. ^ "Devin Nunes's Family Farm Is Hiding a Politically Explosive Secret". Esquire. 2018-09-30. Retrieved 2018-10-01.
  13. ^ "What an explosive story about Devin Nunes' family farm means for his high-profile house race". Mother Jones. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  14. ^ "Report: Devin Nunes' family's farm is in northwest Iowa, not California". Des Moines Register. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  15. ^ https://www.facebook.com/amber.j.phillips. "Analysis | Just how 'politically explosive' is the Devin Nunes secret that Esquire uncovered?". Washington Post. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  16. ^ "Report: Devin Nunes' Family Farm Was Secretly Moved to Iowa From California". The Daily Beast. 2018-10-01. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  17. ^ "Bloomberg - Are you a robot?". www.bloomberg.com. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  18. ^ "Devin Nunes' family farm likely using undocumented labor". Salon. 2018-10-01. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  19. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  20. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on 2015-05-12. Retrieved 2015-06-04.
  21. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  22. ^ "Find A Grave". William Lloyd Harding. Retrieved 2010-12-11.
  23. ^ "Whitehead to enter Iowa Golf Hall of Fame | Golf | siouxcityjournal.com". siouxcityjournal.com. Retrieved 2017-01-03.

External links[edit]